Department of Kinesiology & Community Health

Amy Woods
Department Head
117 Huff Hall
1206 South Fourth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
PH: (217) 244-0823

department website: http://www.kch.illinois.edu/

department faculty: Kinesiology & Community Health Faculty


college catalog page: Applied Health Sciences

college website: http://www.ahs.illinois.edu/


The Kinesiology curriculum leads to a bachelor of science degree that will prepare students for careers in human movement-related fields and/or advanced professional or graduate study. The undergraduate program provides the student with a broad general education, a departmental core integral to the understanding of the diverse aspects of human movement, and a correlate area of courses specific to the student's area of concentration within Kinesiology.

The Community Health Program at the University of Illinois prepares students in the ever changing world of health care and health behavior as practitioners and offers three concentrations at the undergraduate level: Health Education and Promotion, Health Planning and Administration, and Rehabilitation Studies. All curricula are built on a foundation of general education courses which emphasize communication skills and critical thinking. The Professional Core courses are designed to help students develop skills in planning, implementation, and evaluation in the context of health services and programs. Students must complete an internship during their senior year in a setting related to the degree and their interests. Recent internship sites have included the American Heart Association, the American Red Cross, hospitals, nursing homes, fitness centers, work site health education programs, and substance abuse prevention centers.


director of undergraduate studies:

undergraduate office:

undergraduate email:


Undergraduate Programs:

major: Community Health, BS

major: Kinesiology, BS


The Kinesiology curriculum leads to a bachelor of science degree that will prepare students for careers in human movement-related fields and/or advanced professional or graduate study. The undergraduate program provides the student with a broad general education, a departmental core integral to the understanding of the diverse aspects of human movement, and a correlate area of courses specific to the student's area of concentration within Kinesiology.

The Community Health Program at the University of Illinois prepares students in the ever changing world of health care and health behavior as practitioners and offers three concentrations at the undergraduate level: Health Education and Promotion, Health Planning and Administration, and Rehabilitation Studies. All curricula are built on a foundation of general education courses which emphasize communication skills and critical thinking. The Professional Core courses are designed to help students develop skills in planning, implementation, and evaluation in the context of health services and programs. Students must complete an internship during their senior year in a setting related to the degree and their interests. Recent internship sites have included the American Heart Association, the American Red Cross, hospitals, nursing homes, fitness centers, work site health education programs, and substance abuse prevention centers.


department head: Amy Woods

director of graduate studies: Steven Petruzzello

graduate office: Julie Jenkins

906 South Goodwin Ave

112 Freer Hall     MC-052

Urbana, IL 61801

graduate phone: (217) 333-1083

graduate email: jjenkns@illinois.edu


Graduate Programs:

degree:  Kinesiology, MS

degree:  Doctor of Philosophy in Kinesiology

degree:  Master of Science in Community Health

degree:  Master of Science in Rehabilitation

degree:  Master of Public Health

joint degree: Community Health, BS and Master's of Public Health, MPH

joint degree: Kinesiology, BS and Master's of Public Health, MPH


Graduate Degree Programs

The Kinesiology Program in the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Major areas of specialization at both the master's and doctoral degree levels include:

  • Biobehavioral Kinesiology (the study of biomechanics, exercise and sport psychology, kinesmetrics, motor control and learning, and motor development)
  • Cultural Pedagogical & Interpretive Studies (the study of the interaction between physical activity and the individual from a variety of cultural, sociological and pedagogical perspectives)
  • Exercise Physiology (the study of exercise stress on body systems).

The Community Health Program in the Department of Kinesiology & Community Health offers programs of study leading to the Master of Science in Community Health, Master of Science in Rehabilitation, Master of Public Health (M.P.H.), and Doctor of Philosophy in Community Health degrees.

The Chronic Disease, Disability, and Society specialization prepares graduates for advanced research or as health specialists who are well versed in social determinants of health. Graduates from this specialization will have a strong foundation related to health disparities, chronic disease and disability. The specialization in Epidemiology prepares students for the analysis of disease occurrences and problems in populations and instruction in the various methodologies, statistical techniques and designs for obtaining such understanding. The Global Health specialization focuses on international health from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students in this concentration may take courses that provide a broad view of global health contexts from various departments across campus. Finally, the specialization in Health Policy and Administration prepares students for the examination of management principles related to health care institutions and in procedures and methods for the analysis of health policy development, implementation and evaluation.

The M.S. in Community Health has specializations in Chronic Disease, Disability, and Society; Epidemiology; Global Health; and Health Policy and Administration. The M.S.P.H. program is not currently accepting applications, and individuals interested in pursuing a Master’s degree in public health are encouraged to apply to the M.P.H. degree program. The M.P.H. degree is a professionally focused degree designed to prepare students for a career in public health practice.  The M.P.H. degree offers an area of concentration in health behavior and promotion. The Ph.D. program is designed to prepare graduates for positions of leadership in teaching, research, and service in universities, industries, and private and government agencies in the United States and in other countries.

Admission

Applications for all degrees except the Master of Public Health (MPH) are due on January 15 for fall admission.  Applications for spring semester are due October 1. Applications for the Master of Public Health (MPH) degree are only accepted for Fall admission until April 1.

Admission to the M.S. degree program requires a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher education, a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (A = 4.0) for the last two years of undergraduate study and any graduate work completed, Graduate Record Examination (GRE) test scores, a statement of interest, and three letters of recommendation.

Admission to the Ph.D. degree program requires a minimum of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher education with a minimum grade point average of 3.5 (A = 4.0) for the last two years of undergraduate study. Applicants who have a master’s degree should have a grade point average of 3.5 for previous graduate-level work. All applicants are required to submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) test scores, a statement of interest, and three letters of recommendation.

International students whose native language is not English, must also score a minimum of 580 on the paper-based TOEFL test, 237 on the computer-based test, or 92 on the internet-based test (iBT).  Applicants whose native language is not English and who are seeking a teaching assistantship must provide evidence of spoken English language proficiency by meeting minimum score requirements specified by the University (see www.grad.illinois.edu/admissions/taengprof.htm).

Medical Scholars Program

Please note the Medical Scholars program is not accepting applications at this time.

The Medical Scholars Program permits highly qualified students to integrate the study of medicine with study for a graduate degree in a second discipline, including Kinesiology. Students may apply to the Medical Scholars Program prior to beginning graduate school or while in the graduate program. Applicants to the Medical Scholars Program must meet the admissions standards for and be accepted into both the doctoral graduate program and the College of Medicine. Students in the dual degree program must meet the specific requirements for both the medical and graduate degrees. On average, students take eight years to complete both degrees.  Further information on this program is available by contacting the Medical Scholars Program, 125 Medical Sciences Building, (217) 333-8146 or at https://www.med.illinois.edu/mdphd/.

Graduate Teaching Experience

Although teaching is not a general Graduate College requirement, experience in teaching is considered an important part of the graduate experience in this program.

Faculty Research Interests

Kinesiology faculty conduct research and supervise graduate research in the following areas:

  • Physical activity and aging
  • immune function
  • psychological, physical and cognitive function
  • fitness and health
  • psychophysiology
  • motor development
  • teacher education
  • teacher effectiveness
  • sport in society and culture
  • motor control

Community Health faculty research interests cover a wide range of subjects, including global health, health education, community health development, health behavior, health policy, health planning and management, rehabilitation and disability studies, chronic disease, epidemiology, biostatistical and epidemiologic research methodology, health economics, evaluation research, and aging studies.

Facilities and Resources

The department facilities include laboratories for research in biomechanics, bone and body composition, cardiovascular function, exercise immunology, exercise psychology, exercise neuroscience, neurocognitive kinesiology, motor control, gait and balance, kinesmetrics, motor behavior, muscle physiology and pedagogical technology.

Financial Aid

A number of teaching assistantships are available in the department's instructional programs. A limited number of research assistantships are available to support the departmental research activities. Assistantships usually provide a stipend for services performed as well as a tuition and partial fee waiver.

CHLH Class Schedule

Community Health Courses

CHLH 100   Contemporary Health   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines concepts of health and health promotion in contemporary society with emphasis on a healthy lifestyle for individuals and groups. Topics include self care, health insurance, exercise, nutrition and weight control, sexuality, contraception, tobacco, alcohol, cardiovascular health, infectious diseases, and cancer.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

CHLH 101   Introduction to Public Health   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to the nation's public health system; includes an overview of the basic concepts and core functions of public health practice, the scope of applications, and the variety of service organizations (both public and private) that shape public health.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

CHLH 110   Intro to the Health Sciences   credit: 3 Hours.

This elective course provides students with a general overview of the day to day job requirements and responsibilities of variety of allied healthcare professionals and how they interact with other members of the healthcare team. Students will also learn about the wide variety of practice settings available along the continuum of care. Through the course, students will learn basic medical terminology, concepts and skills in preparation for internships and graduate school. Same as KIN 110.

CHLH 125   Orientation KIN & Comm Health   credit: 1 Hour.

Serves as an introduction to the Kinesiology and Community Health Department and provides an overview of the Kinesiology and Community Health curricula, areas of study, and opportunities available for careers in the field. Enrollment required for Community Health freshmen and transfer students. Credit is not given for both CHLH 125 and KIN 125.

CHLH 199   Undergraduate Open Seminar   credit: 1 to 5 Hours.

Approved for letter and S/U grading. May be repeated up to a maximum of 10 hours.

CHLH 200   Mental Health   credit: 2 Hours.

Introduction to the science of mental health and illness including personality development, the genesis and manifestations of mental illness, and the maintenance of mental health; taught with an emphasis on the preventive and medical aspects of mental health.

CHLH 201   Public Health Research Methods   credit: 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the basic principles and concepts underlying research methods on public health. Topics include conceptualization, measurement, research design, sampling, evaluation, data sources and ethics. The students will be exposed to a wide range of quantitative, and mixed methods.

CHLH 206   Human Sexuality   credit: 2 Hours.

Emphasizes the behavioral aspects of human sexuality. Topics include: birth control; prenatal care, pregnancy and childbirth; sex roles; premarital sex; lifestyles; marriage and divorce.

CHLH 210   Community Health Organizations   credit: 2 Hours.

Overview of institutions and agencies which provide health information, education, services, and care. Includes historical foundations, constituencies, organizational goals and structure, funding and expenditures, modes of service delivery, political and ethical issues.

CHLH 243   Drug Use and Abuse   credit: 2 Hours.

Introduction to the biological, psychological, pharmacological, and legal aspects of drug use and abuse; surveys community and university resources concerned with drug use and abuse; emphasizes personal and social actions for responsible drug use.

CHLH 244   Health Statistics   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to biostatistics. Students learn concepts necessary to understand statistical inference as applied to health issues.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Quantitative Reasoning I

CHLH 250   Health Care Systems   credit: 3 Hours.

Overview of the major issues confronting health care systems from a macro perspective. Identification and analysis of the functions, major participants and trends in health care systems in the United States and abroad. Attention on current and emerging issues having implications for health care systems in industrialized nations.

CHLH 260   Introduction to Medical Ethics   credit: 3 Hours.

Course stresses normative bioethics: decisions about what is ethical behavior in a variety of real and practical issues. Analysis of medical ethical cases at the individual, community and wider national and international levels will be addressed. Approved for both letter and S/U grading.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Hist & Phil

CHLH 274   Introduction to Epidemiology   credit: 3 Hours.

Basic concepts and methods of epidemiology; patterns of disease occurrence; applications of epidemiology to health education, health services administration and planning, health policy, and environmental health.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Quantitative Reasoning I

CHLH 304   Foundations of Health Behavior   credit: 4 Hours.

Examination of the application of the social and behavioral sciences to health and health behavior. Psychological, social psychological, and sociological approaches to health behavior are analyzed. Topics covered include development of health attitudes and behaviors, perceptions of health and illness, methods of changing health behavior and patient-provider interaction. Prerequisite: CHLH 100, or consent of instructor; completion of the campus Composition I requirement.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Beh Sci
Advanced Composition

CHLH 314   Introduction to Aging   credit: 3 Hours.

A multidisciplinary introduction to the study of aging; the social, psychological and physiological context of changing roles in later life; public and private policies that affect older people and their familis. Same as HDFS 314, RST 314, PSYC 314, and REHB 314.

CHLH 330   Disability in American Society   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as REHB 330. See REHB 330.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

CHLH 340   Health Promotion Practicum   credit: 3 Hours.

Preparation and presentation of lifestyle workshops to campus community groups. Practica selected from one or more of the following topics: chemical education, sexuality, stress management or campus acquaintance rape education (CARE). Same as SOCW 350. Approved for both letter and S/U grading. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

CHLH 380   Orientation to Internship   credit: 1 Hour.

Provides students with information concerning placement in internship. Topics include internship requirements; student responsibilities; preparation of resumes and cover letters; selecting an organization or site; interviewing; issues of professional development. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

CHLH 393   Special Projects   credit: 2 or 3 Hours.

Special projects in research and independent investigation in any phase of health, kinesiology, recreation, and related areas selected by the students. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours.

CHLH 402   Cancer Epidemiology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Class on cancer epidemiology will address the investigation of the descriptive and analytic epidemiology of cancer. It will include information on the development of malignancy and characteristics of tumor cells. The investigation of the relationship between various risk and protective factors and the development of different types of cancer will be discussed in an epidemiologic context. The role of primary prevention and secondary prevention (screening) will also be covered. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent class in epidemiology or consent of instructor. Junior standing or above.

CHLH 404   Gerontology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Interdisciplinary approach to the study of aging and the aged from physiological, psychological, and social perspectives. Same as HDFS 404. 3 or 4 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours.

CHLH 405   Aging with Disability   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Due to improvements in medical management, persons with disabilities are living longer lives. They, however, face new problems and impairments. This course will explore the psychological and physical changes persons with disabilities face as they age. In addition, the course examines the impact that aging with disability has on the US healthcare system, legislation and healthcare professionals. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

CHLH 407   Disability, Culture & Society   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examines the cultural and social contexts of disability, their consequences for the experience and management of disability, and implications for cultural competence in disability-related research and practice. Same as ANTH 404, KIN 407, and REHB 407. 3 or 4 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours.

CHLH 409   Women's Health   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the culture of women in relationship to their health. Study is devoted to selected health care issues, developmental and physiological changes in the life cycle, health problems that affect women, and the maintenance of health. Same as GWS 409. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: CHLH 100 or equivalent; or consent of instructor.

CHLH 410   Public Health Practice   credit: 4 Hours.

Theory and practice of public health promotion as they relate to educational approaches in solving community health problems. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: CHLH 210 or consent of instructor.

CHLH 415   International Health   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Explores the various factors that impact the health of populations around the world. Political, cultural, social, environmental and other domains will be examined in relation to how they affect the health of residents of various countries. 3 or 4 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours.

CHLH 421   Health Data Analysis   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Introduces health data analysis, sources and uses of health data, collection techniques and classification procedures, commonly used health indices, techniques of rate adjustment, graphic presentation of data as they relate to the planning, conducting, and evaluating of community health programs. 3 or 4 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Quantitative Reasoning I course or equivalent.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Quantitative Reasoning II

CHLH 429   Research Techniques   credit: 4 Hours.

Study of the ethics of research, research literature, research designs, and health measurement techniques utilized in the public health sciences. Emphasizes developing skills in analyzing research and assessment of health behaviors, and problem identification and research design for individual student research projects. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: CHLH 590, or SOC 485, or EPSY 480; or equivalent.

CHLH 455   Health Services Financing   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines major topics and emerging trends in health financing, including sources of revenue, public and private financing organizations, reimbursement and sources of revenue to health providers, and capital financing in the health care industry. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

CHLH 456   Organization of Health Care   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

Examines types and performance of health care organizations (e.g. , doctors' offices, clinics, hospitals, and nursing homes), networks of health services, evaluation of health care, and social policy issues relating to organizations in the U. S. health care system. 2 to 4 undergraduate hours. 2 to 4 graduate hours.

CHLH 457   Health Planning   credit: 3 Hours.

Survey of the history and objectives of health planning as related to medical care delivery in the United States; methods of health, institutional and community planning; planning and marketing concepts and methods; analysis of consumer behavior, public policies, and private competitive forces. Same as SOCW 457. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: CHLH 250 and junior standing.

CHLH 458   Health Administration   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines management principles relative to health care institutions emphasizing goal setting, decision making, system analysis, organizational structure, conflict resolution, and leadership theories. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing, or consent of instructor.

CHLH 469   Environmental Health   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Appreciation of the concepts and mechanisms used to prevent or control environmental conditions that may lead to infectious or other environmentally induced diseases. Presents topics from a public health perspective that include air pollution, water supply management, waste management, radiation protection, food hygiene, occupational health and disaster management. Same as ENVS 469. 3 or 4 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: CHLH 274 or equivalent.

CHLH 470   Technology, Health, and Aging   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

An undergrad/grad interdisciplinary course that is focused on technology, healthcare, and aging. It is a combination lecture/lab course wherein students learn design and evaluation tools, are part of a project development team, participate in transgenerational learning activities with older adults, and focus on technology design to support healthy aging. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Restricted to students with Junior or Senior class standing and Graduate students.

CHLH 474   Principles of Epidemiology   credit: 4 Hours.

Investigation of descriptive epidemiologic techniques (comparisons of disease rates in different populations) and analytic study designs (case-control and cohort studies and randomized trials). Applications to and examples from invectious and chronic diseases are presented. Group exercises involving the investigation of epidemiologic problems and application of analytic epidemiologic techniques are performed. Same as ENVS 474 and PATH 474. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: One statistics course.

CHLH 485   Community Health Internship   credit: 8 Hours.

Supervised field experience in official, voluntary and professional health agencies; designed to provide students with work experience in actual field situations. Students work in University approved health agencies for a minimum of 320 undergraduate hours. 8 undergraduate hours. 8 graduate hours. Approved for S/U grading. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Community Health.

CHLH 494   Special Topics   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Lecture course in topics of current interest; specific subject matter announced in the Class Schedule. 1 to 4 undergraduate hours. 1 to 4 graduate hours. May be repeated.

CHLH 501   Issues in Health Education   credit: 4 Hours.

Analyzes current developments, trends, and controversies in health education with emphasis on developing student competencies for intervention planning, implementation and analyses; and examines issues affecting the health educator in various work settings, including patient care, public health, school health, and higher.

CHLH 510   Public Health Dev   credit: 4 Hours.

Advanced study of the principles, practice and current issues of public health at the local, state, national and international levels, including the relationships between public health departments, voluntary health agencies, and other community organizations.

CHLH 527   Statistics in Epidemiology   credit: 4 Hours.

Description and application of quantitative issues and statistical techniques prominent in the analysis of classification data arising from epidemiologic cohort or case-control aetiologic studies; studies of preventive public health; and therapeutic clinical interventions. Practice using available computing software for implementation is stressed. Same as ENVS 527 and PATH 525. Prerequisite: CHLH 474 and minimum of two statistics courses covering multiple regression and correlation.

CHLH 540   Health Behavior: Theory   credit: 4 Hours.

Analysis of social science theories and perspectives that comprise the foundation of health education theory and practice. Includes development of a conceptual frame of reference for understanding, predicting, and facilitating change in health behaviors. Same as KIN 540. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHLH 541   Health Disparities Over the Life Course   credit: 4 Hours.

This course provides students with an understanding of how institutional, sociocultural, and individual factors contribute to racial/ethnic, socioeconomic, and sex health disparities over the life-course. A lifespan developmental approach is adopted to examine issues of health disparities in greater depth. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Prerequisite: Restricted to graduate students.

CHLH 545   Grant Writing for Health Professionals   credit: 4 Hours.

This is a course for students who are interested in learning about the grant writing process. Primary topic areas will include the components of a grant application, grant announcements (FOA/RFA), specific aims and objectives writing, proposal narrative (significance, innovation and approach), budget justifications and grant review process. Various grant mechanisms of major funding agencies will be reviewed, including both federal (NIH, Fulbright, NSF, CDC, and NIDILRR) and private (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, National Multiple Sclerosis Association, and Paralyzed Veterans of America Foundation). Students will complete two grant writing assignments (one NIH grant and one non-NIH grant) to gain hands-on experience with preparing successful grants. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Prerequisite: Restricted to Graduate Students.

CHLH 550   Health Policy: United States   credit: 4 Hours.

Comprehensive analysis of the policy process in health care in the United States; systematic and critical review of health policy development, implementation, and evaluation; impact of government at all levels and the role of providers, industry, labor, and consumer in health policy. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate program in community health or the MBA Administration Program; CHLH 429; or consent of instructor.

CHLH 569   Systematic Review and Meta-analysis   credit: 4 Hours.

The goals of this course are to: (1) Deepen understanding on the key concepts and essential methods in systematic review and meta-analysis though lectures and reading assignments; (2) Master basic skills on conducting systematic review and meta-analysis through hands-on exercises and projects; and (3) complete a publication-quality systematic review and/or meta-analysis of a student's own choice as the final project of this course. 4 graduate hours. 4 professional hours.

CHLH 570   Intro Public Hlth Practice   credit: 1 Hour.

An introduction to principles of public health practice, covering a range of topics including history of public health, determinants of health, structure and function of the public health system, ethics, and public health approaches to prevention and to improving population health. Approved for S/U grading only. Prerequisite: MPH student or consent of the instructor.

CHLH 572   Principles of Epidemiology   credit: 4 Hours.

Advanced course designed to provide an introduction to the fundamental concepts and principles of epidemiology and demonstrate their applicability in the field of public health. Emphasizes the use of epidemiologic data and research to a) describe the pattern of diseases in communities, and b) identify risk factors for diseases and for health disparities. Prerequisite: Completion or concurrent enrollment of basic statistics course is encouraged.

CHLH 573   Biostatistics in Public Health   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduction to fundamental topics in biostatistics in public health, covering univariate and bivariate statistics as well as basic topics in multivariate analysis. Including practice in analyzing health data through computer laboratory sessions.

CHLH 575   Chronic Disease Prevention   credit: 4 Hours.

Advanced course in population-based approaches to chronic disease prevention, with emphasis on policy and environmental strategies affecting lifestyle risk factors. Provides an understanding of common diseases, screen tests, community assessment, systematic evidence reviews, and evidence-based community interventions. Prerequisite: MPH students or consent of instructor.

CHLH 577   Health Program Evaluation   credit: 4 Hours.

Use of research methods and theory for evaluation of initiatives and programs in public health and medical care. Emphasis on acquiring skills in evaluation and conducting evaluations whose results have impact on public health practice. Covers different theories and perspectives on health evaluation. Review of published evaluations used to illustrate research methods and practical issues in program evaluation. Prerequisite: MPH student or consent of instructor.

CHLH 578   Applied Epidemiology   credit: 4 Hours.

Advanced epidemiologic analysis of disease problems. Covers research designs including cohort, case-control, and intervention trials; methods of analysis including multivariate adjustment for confounding and description of effect modification; and application of statistical computer software with emphasis on chronic diseases. Same as PATH 520. Prerequisite: CHLH 474, PATH 517, or equivalent and advanced course work in statistics through multivariate analysis.

CHLH 579   Cultural Competence in Public Health   credit: 4 Hours.

Cultural competence education increases public health professionals' cultural awareness, knowledge of self and others, communication skills, attitudes, and behaviors. This course will examine theoretical models in public health and explore community-based programs as they relate to cultural competence and health promotion. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Prerequisite: Restricted to MPH Graduate Students.

CHLH 585   Community Health Internship   credit: 4 Hours.

Observation, study, and practical work in student's area of specialization under supervision in professional field situations; student works for a minimum of 12 weeks in a University-approved agency or site. Prerequisite: CHLH 429, CHLH 474 and CHLH 510; or graduate standing in community health; or consent of the department.

CHLH 587   MPH Applied Practice Experience   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Provides MPH students with planned, supervised and evaluated field experience in a public health practice setting where students will synthesize knowledge and skills acquired through the course of MPH study. Approved for letter and S/U grading. May be repeated up to 4 hours in separate terms. Prerequisite: Completion of all Core MPH Courses.

CHLH 589   MPH Integrative Learning Experience   credit: 2 Hours.

Provides MPH students an opportunity to synthesize, integrate, and apply knowledge and skills acquired in MPH coursework, through work on a project relevant to public health practice. Generally offered for MPH students in their last semester of study in the MPH program. Prerequisite: MPH student.

CHLH 591   Seminar   credit: 1 Hour.

Lecture, discussions, and critiques on kinesiology and community health related subjects by faculty members and visiting professional leaders; presentation and criticism of student research. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated in subsequent terms as topics vary.

CHLH 593   Special Projects   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

Independent research on special projects. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours. Prerequisite: EPSY 480, KIN 501, and CHLH 540 or equivalent.

CHLH 594   Special Topics   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Lecture course in topics of current interest; specific subject matter announced in the Class Schedule. May be repeated.

CHLH 599   Thesis Research   credit: 0 to 16 Hours.

Preparation of theses in community health. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated to a maximum of 16 hours.

KIN Class Schedule

Kinesiology Courses

KIN 100   Development Activities   credit: 1 to 2 Hours.

Skills and knowledge essential for leisure-time activities which are classified as developmental activities. Prerequisites and descriptions for each developmental activity are provided in the Class Schedule. More than one activity (Sections A through Z) may be taken in the same term. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. May be repeated to a maximum of 2 hours.

KIN 101   Dance Activities   credit: 1 Hour.

Skills and knowledge essential for leisure-time activities which are classified as dance activities. May be repeated; more than one activity (Sections A through Z) may be taken in the same term. Prerequisite: See Class Schedule for prerequisites for each dance activity.

KIN 102   Individual and Dual Activities   credit: 1 Hour.

Skills and knowledge essential for leisure-time activities which are classified as individual and dual activities. Prerequisites for each individual or dual activity are provided in the Class Schedule. More than one activity (Sections A through Z) may be taken in the same term. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule.

KIN 103   Indoor Court Activities   credit: 1 Hour.

Skills and knowledge essential for leisure-time activities which are classified as indoor court activities. Prerequisites for each indoor court activity are provided in the Class Schedule. More than one activity (Sections A through Z) may be taken in the same term.

KIN 104   Skating Activities   credit: 1 Hour.

Skills and knowledge essential for leisure-time activities which are classified as skating activities. Prerequisites for each skating activity are provided in the Class Schedule. Additional Ice Skating Rink Facility charges are required and provided in the Class Schedule. More than one activity (Sections A through Z) may be taken in the same term. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule.

KIN 107   Aquatic Sport Activities   credit: 1 Hour.

Skills and knowledge essential for leisure-time activities which are classified as aquatic sport activities. Prerequisites for each aquatic sport activity are provided in the Class Schedule. More than one activity (Sections A through Z) may be taken in the same term. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule.

KIN 109   Team Sport Activities   credit: 1 Hour.

Skills and knowledge essential for leisure-time activities which are classified as team sport activities. Prerequisites for each team sport activity are provided in the Class Schedule. More than one activity (Sections A through Z) may be taken in the same term.

KIN 111   Prescribed Exercise   credit: 1 Hour.

Prescribed exercises adapted to individual needs, capacities, and interests; open to persons with paraplegia, permanently disabled, and individuals with significant temporary disabilities who will require long term rehabilitation. Students must be registered or eligible to register with DRES. May be repeated to a maximum of 4 hours. Prerequisite: Enrollment restricted to students with permanent disabilities or disabilities which are long-term in nature. Student should be registered or eligible to register with DRES.

KIN 120   Injuries in Sport   credit: 2 Hours.

Emphasizes injury mechanisms, means of injury prevention, and emergency care applied to various types of sport injuries; laboratory sessions emphasize preventive and therapeutic taping and emergency first aid. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule.

KIN 121   Survey of Sports Medicine   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to sports medicine for non-kinesiology majors; includes discussion of training, conditioning, preparation for sports, injury aspects of sports, and rehabilitation.

KIN 122   Physical Activity and Health   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides the scientific evidence of physical activity in preventing disease and optimizing quality of life. Teaches behavioral change strategies to achieve an active lifestyle.

KIN 125   Orientation KIN & Comm Health   credit: 1 Hour.

Serves as an introduction to the Kinesiology and Community Health Department and provides an overview of the Kinesiology and Community Health curricula, areas of study, and opportunities available for a career in the field. Enrollment required for Kinesiology freshmen and transfer students. Credit is not given for both KIN 125 and CHLH 125.

KIN 130   Analysis of Basic Movement   credit: 2 Hours.

Introduction to human movement through development of skills and knowledge relative to structure and function of the human body in selected physical activities including: basic postural and locomotion patterns and fundamental throwing patterns; also studies developmental aspects of typical and atypical movement skills. Emphasizes performance and qualitative analysis of movement skills.

KIN 140   Social Sci of Human Movement   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to the social scientific aspects of human movement including sport; particular emphasis on concepts derived from the social sciences (including psychology) that are appropriate to human movement. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

KIN 142   Contemporary Issues in Sport   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines current issues in sport relative to competition, economics, race, sex, youth, educational institutions, deviant behavior, religion, psychology, and the media.

KIN 150   Bioscience of Human Movement   credit: 3 Hours.

Integrates anatomical and physiological aspects of human movement; emphasizes how the body moves, physiological responses to exercise stress, physical conditioning and physical fitness. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Nat Sci & Tech - Life Sciences

KIN 160   Introduction to Kinesiology   credit: 3 Hours.

Kinesiology is the interdisciplinary study of physical activity that includes a number of sub-disciplines. This course will examine these areas of study within Kinesiology from scientific, applied, and experiential perspectives. Students will study fundamental/introductory concepts associated with each area of Kinesiology, explore those concepts within research and applied contexts, and complete activities in which they experience various dimensions of those concepts.

KIN 199   Undergraduate Open Seminar   credit: 0 to 5 Hours.

Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. Approved for letter and S/U grading. May be repeated.

KIN 201   Physical Activity Research Methods   credit: 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction of physical activity measurement and methods. The course will focus on (a) defining physical activity and associated terms and concepts; (b) providing detailed understanding of approaches and tools for measuring physical activity; and (c) facilitating understanding of scientific methods for physical activity research (e.g., experimental and non-experimental designs).

KIN 230   Diversity in Recreation, Sport, and Tourism   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as HDFS 263 and RST 230. See RST 230.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - US Minority

KIN 247   Intro to Sport Psychology   credit: 3 Hours.

Analysis of the competitive sport process, with study of how personality and situational variables affect motivation, anxiety, and aggression in sport. Attention is given to the psychological skills needed by coaches and athletes for successful and enjoyable sports participation.

KIN 249   Sport & Modern Society   credit: 3 Hours.

The sociological analysis of sport in modern societies with regard to social class, politics, community, education, and collective behavior.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

KIN 257   Coordination, Control & Skill   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to the concepts and principles of the coordination and control of movement and the development of skilled action. The course will focus on such topics as fundamental movement activities; movement control processes; acquisition, retention and transfer of skill; and the role of constraints to action. These topics have implications for understanding skilled performance, motor development and human performance in general. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. Prerequisite: KIN 140 and KIN 150 or consent of instructor.

KIN 259   Motor Development and Control   credit: 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an overview of motor development across the life span as well as an introduction to the discipline of motor behavior/control. Specifically, it focuses on the concepts and principles of coordination, the control of movement, and development of skilled action throughout the life span. The course focuses on such topics as the development of fundamental movement activities; movement control processes; acquisition, retention and transfer skill; and the role of constraints to action. Same as HDFS 259. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. Credit is not given for both KIN 259 and KIN 257.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Beh Sci

KIN 260   Teaching Activities I   credit: 3 Hours.

An activity-based course focusing on skills, knowledge, and teaching progressions related to territorial and net sports for school age students. Students will develop knowledge of the basic skills and teaching progressions related to the activities covered in the class. Prerequisite: KIN 130.

KIN 261   Teaching Activities II   credit: 2 Hours.

An activity-based course focusing on skills, knowledge, and teaching progressions related to target sports, rhythms, dance and fitness activities, and adventure education activities for school age students. Students will develop knowledge of the basic skills and teaching progressions related to the activities covered in the class. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: KIN 130.

KIN 262   Motor Develop, Growth & Form   credit: 3 Hours.

Examination of the concepts of motor development, physical growth, and body form throughout the lifespan. Major emphasis is on the period of birth through adolescence. Same as HDFS 262.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Beh Sci

KIN 268   Children's Movement   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction and overview of kinesiology principles and physical activity related to children. Laboratory portion of class focuses on the application of information to teaching physical activity to elementary school children. Prerequisite: For non-kinesiology majors.

KIN 340   Soc & Psych of Phys Activity   credit: 3 Hours.

Discusses how social and psychological processes and constraints affect human action in physical activity environments. Attention is given to socialization, personal dynamics, stratification, and ideological and economic constraints upon the manifestations of physical activity. Prerequisite: KIN 140 or PSYC 100 and completion of the Campus Composition I general education requirement.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Advanced Composition

KIN 346   Case Study: Endless Summer   credit: 3 Hours.

The 1966 classic film --The Endless Summer-- and related films and literature are used as lenses for the historical-cultural study of human movement in the form of riding waves of water. Surf culture and films are global phenomena and by using such as unique cases, students gain mastery in cultural-interpretive theories, themes, and vocabulary, and in articulating perspectives on social roles, knowledge, and power. Same as RST 346 and MACS 346.

KIN 352   Bioenergetics of Movement   credit: 3 Hours.

Study of the nature of energy transfer during physical activity; mechanisms of metabolic control, force production, cardiorespiratory support and adaptation relative to physical activity. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule.

KIN 355   Biomechanics of Human Movement   credit: 3 Hours.

Studies the biological and mechanical principles of human motor performance; analyzes selected movement skills in depth. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule.

KIN 360   Adapted Physical Education   credit: 3 Hours.

Organization, administration, and conduct of physical education programs for the most prevalent types of medical conditions found in school settings; emphasis on analyzing motoric needs and prescribing programs of motor activity for special populations, including individuals with mental retardation and learning disabilities Prerequisite: Junior standing or above and enrollment in the Teacher Certification program or consent of instructor.

KIN 361   Curriculum in Grades K-6   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the theoretical and philosophic curricular principles necessary to the development of a sound, professionally grounded, and research-based curriculum for children in grades K-6. Requires planning a variety of developmentally appropriate learning activities that are taught to children during micro-teaching experiences in the field. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above and enrollment in the Teacher Certification program or consent of the instructor.

KIN 362   Curriculum in Grades 7-12   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides students with theoretical knowledge and professional practice in secondary physical education curriculum and instruction. This research-based course emphasizes effective teaching, development of content, and analysis of curricular models in grades 7-12. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above and enrollment in the Teacher Certification program or consent of instructor.

KIN 363   Instructional Strategies in PE   credit: 3 Hours.

Analyzes the teaching-learning process, emphasizing the identification of instructional strategies specific to the development of skilled performance in movement activities. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above and enrollment in the Teacher Certification program.

KIN 364   Exper in the Common School   credit: 3 Hours.

Supervised practice in observing, assisting, and teaching children in elementary, junior high school, and senior high school. Emphasis is on understanding motor behavior, teacher-learner behavior, and interrelatedness with other aspects of the learning environment. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above and enrollment in the Teacher Certification program or consent of the instructor.

KIN 365   Civic Engagement in Wellness   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides scholarly knowledge and practical experience related to environmental, intellectual, physical, psychological, spiritual, and social wellness. Students acquire leadership and real-world skills while working in teams to develop and implement projects that facilitate health and well-being in the population of adults living in the community. Projects emphasize integrative learning and are showcased in both written and oral formats. Same as AHS 365, CHLH 365, RST 365, and SHS 370.

KIN 369   Coaching Strategies   credit: 3 Hours.

Examination of philosophy, ethics, strategies, motivational techniques, performance analysis, program organization, contest administration, and equipment and facility management related to coaching.

KIN 385   Exper in Kinesiology Research   credit: 3 Hours.

Supervised laboratory experiences in kinesiology research; individual work under the supervision of members of the faculty in their respective fields. The student assists with data collection, processing, and analysis for research in progress. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

KIN 386   Exercise Instruction & Elderly   credit: 3 Hours.

This course is designed to offer practical experience opportunities to undergraduate Kinesiology students aspiring to work in applied exercise fields with a diverse aged population. It will entail extensive "on the job" training through the Lifetime Fitness Program, an older adult service program of the Department of Kinesiology. Additionally, students will gain training in current program management practicies. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: KIN 352 or consent of instructor is required. A current CPR is required at the beginning of the term and certification must remain current.

KIN 387   Exper in the Agency Setting   credit: 3 Hours.

Supervised practical experience in leadership roles in nonschool agency settings; emphasis on observing, planning, and conducting physical activity programs for children and/or adults in preschool, recreation, or other social agencies. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

KIN 390   Honors   credit: 2 Hours.

Course is restricted to James Scholars pursuing the Civic Commitment and Leadership Tracks. Designed to support completion of the James Scholar honors project. Same as CHLH 390 and RST 390. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: James Scholar standing.

KIN 391   Special Project-Problems   credit: 2 or 3 Hours.

Special projects in research and independent investigation in any phase of health, kinesiology, physical education, and related areas selected by the students. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing; grade-point average of 2.5; consent of instructor.

KIN 393   Honors Thesis   credit: 3 Hours.

Planning, researching and writing of an honors thesis, under supervision of a faculty member, on a problem of appropriate scope and character. Paper will be presented at a suitable meeting and/or seminar. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing when enrolling; minimum grade point average (total, University and Kinesiology prefix courses) of 3.25; a minimum of one full year (2 semesters) remaining at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign campus; and submission of a written proposal.

KIN 401   Measure & Eval in Kinesiology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examines the concepts of observation, measurement, and evaluation of human motor performance and functioning in physical activity contexts. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: KIN 140 and KIN 150, or graduate standing, or consent of instructor.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Quantitative Reasoning II

KIN 442   Body, Culture & Society   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Analysis of the significant social aspects of the human body including anthropological, historical, psychological and sociological perspectives. Places emphasis on cross-culture and cross-national studies of bodily behavior with particular stress on exercise, health and sport practices. Same as GWS 442. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: KIN 249 or SOC 249, or graduate standing; or consent of instructor.

KIN 443   Psychophysiology in Ex & Sport   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Designed to give the student an understanding of the interaction between psychological processes and physiological parameters in exercise and sport. Examines psychophysiological exercise and sport research with particular attention to relevant models and theories. Same as PSYC 443. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, KIN 340, or graduate standing, or consent of instructor.

KIN 444   Physical Activity and Chronic Diseases   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Focuses on the scientific evidence regarding the health benefits of exercise, physical activity, and physical fitness in the prevention and management of chronic diseases. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

KIN 447   Psych of Sport Performance   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Outlines the social psychological parameters which influence behavior and performance in sport; emphasizes the impact of social influences upon the individual within the sport context, including such factors as achievement motivation, competition, anxiety, aggression, and personality. Same as PSYC 447. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: KIN 140, KIN 247, or PSYC 201, or graduate standing, or consent of instructor.

KIN 448   Exercise & Health Psychology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examines the psychological determinants and consequences of exercise and physical activity as a health promoting behavioral process. Same as CHLH 448. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above, or graduate standing, or consent of instructor.

KIN 449   Rehabilitation Biomechanics   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

This course is for students who are interested in occupational therapy, physical therapy, and prosthetics and orthotics. General principles for application in injury prevention and rehabilitation will be taught. Students will learn how to use biomechanical models to estimate joint compression forces and muscle forces, and use this information to design training and rehabilitation programs for people with musculoskeletal and neuromuscular injury. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

KIN 450   Biochemistry of Exercise   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Introduces the metabolic and biochemical adaptation of the body in response to acute and chronic physical activity. Primary focus is given to the subcellular and enzymatic regulation and integration during exercise. Substrate metabolism, bioenergetics, hormonal action and nutritional influences as related to exercise are emphasized. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: KIN 352 or MCB 450; or consent of instructor.

KIN 451   Skeletal Muscle Physiology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Offers basic information on skeletal muscle anatomy, physiology and function which will provide a basis for understanding changes in muscle structure and function during periods of increased or decreased us. Knowledge gained in this course can be used in areas such as design of training programs, physical therapy, or injury prevention. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: KIN 352 or prior consent of the instructor.

KIN 452   Clin & Applied Ex Physiology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Physical fitness appraisal and guidance in clinical and applied settings with emphasis on medical clearance, risk factor assessment, physical fitness assessment and exercise prescription. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: KIN 352, or graduate standing, or consent of instructor.

KIN 453   Nutrition for Performance   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Nutrition for performance is the fusion of two disciplines, nutrition and exercise physiology, which provides the knowledge-base to support and optimize training, performance, and recovery. This course will provide information regarding the use of nutrition to increase performance in athletes training for strength or endurance. Same as FSHN 453. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

KIN 457   Motor Learning & Control   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Discussion and analysis of scientific principles related to the learning and control of motor skills; review of related literature and research in motor learning and control. The focus of the course is on mechanisms for the control of movement and recent theories of how movements are acquired and performed. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: KIN 257 or graduate standing or consent of instructor.

KIN 459   Physical Activity & Aging   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examines aging and age-related changes in the cells, tissues, organs, and systems of the human body; emphasizes the role of physical activity and other lifestyle choices in modifying the aging process and in influencing the onset and progression of the chronic diseases which accompany aging. Same as HDFS 459. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Junior, Senior, or graduate standing or consent of instructor.

KIN 460   Technology & Pedagogical KINES   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Promotes mastery of technology skills and complex computer applications through the analysis of research and critical issues related to technology in Kinesiology. The completion of technology modules, requiring problem solving and the collection and analysis of assessment data, will culminate in an interactive, multimedia project. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

KIN 470   Exercise Endocrinology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

The objective of this course is to gain a better understanding of the endocrine system and its response to physical exercise. Therefore, this course will provide a basic review of 1) the major glands and tissues that secrete chemical messengers, 2) the ability of acute exercise and exercise training to regulate chemical messengers, and 3) the physiological consequences of endocrine adaptation to exercise. Clinical disorders associated with endocrine dysfunction will also be discussed when relevant. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: KIN 352.

KIN 473   Skill Acquisition Strategies   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examines theory and practice related to structuring practice conditions to maximize the acquisition and performance of motor skills. The nature of skill, activities, and strategies for enhancing skill are discussed with particular emphasis placed on strategies that instructors, teachers, and/or coaches can use to enhance skill acquisition and performance. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: KIN 257 or graduate standing or consent of instructor.

KIN 474   Tech-Driven Health Intervention   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Course will review and critique the state of the science of technology-driven health behavior interventions. A broad scope of technologies and health behaviors will be covered and students will acquire an understanding of current uses of technology for facilitating health behavior change and maintenance. Students will examine the efficacy and potential for large-scale adoption and dissemination; and develop skills necessary to apply technology-based solutions to address public health problems. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

KIN 485   Clin Exper in Sports Medicine   credit: 2 to 8 Hours.

Clinical experiences in medical supervision of sports programs, in the areas of therapeutic exercises, fitness programming, and cardiac rehabilitation. 2 to 8 undergraduate hours. 2 to 8 graduate hours. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

KIN 494   Special Topics   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Lecture course on topics of current interest; specific topics announced in the Class Schedule. 1 to 4 undergraduate hours. 1 to 4 graduate hours. May be repeated.

KIN 501   Kinesiology Research Methods   credit: 4 Hours.

Review and appraisal of common research procedures; application of statistical procedures, library methods, evaluation procedures, and experimental methods.

KIN 543   Physical Activity & Cognition   credit: 4 Hours.

Examines the relationship between physical activity and fitness on brain and cognition across the lifespan. The psychobiology of physical activity effects on cognition is emphasized. Other areas of study include aging, development, and psychosocial factors. Methodological issues as well as human and animal models of research will be studied.

KIN 551   Sci Basis of Phys Performance   credit: 4 Hours.

Contemporary trends in the study of human performance and exercise stress; analysis of the research literature, experimental strategies, and research instrumentation. Lecture-discussion and laboratory.

KIN 552   Adv Skeletal Muscle Physiology   credit: 4 Hours.

Course provides an in-depth understanding of skeletal muscle anatomy, cell biology, and physiology. Classroom discussions of primary literature and other activities will focus on muscle structure and function. Information will also be provided on the molecular and cellular basis for adaptations that occur with increased use, such as endurance or strength training, or periods of disuse, such as injury and disease.

KIN 553   Circulorespiratory Physiology   credit: 4 Hours.

Aerobic performance responses to short-term, intermittent, and prolonged physical activity; special consideration given to endurance training methods and assessment techniques, ergogenic aids, and problems associated with growth, environmental influences, and competitive sport. Prerequisite: KIN 551 or consent of instructor.

KIN 557   Stress Immunology   credit: 4 Hours.

This course will examine the role of stress in modulating immune function and the pathobiological mechanisms resulting in disease. An emphasis will be placed upon the reciprocal communication pathways that exist between the central nervous, endocrine and immune systems. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. It will be assumed that students will have introductory knowledge in biochemistry, endocrinology, and immunology.

KIN 560   Research on Teacher Education   credit: 4 Hours.

Critically examines advanced theories, trends, problems, and implications of research on teacher education in Kinesiology. Students will complete a series of written assignments that are grounded in theory, illustrate critical thinking skills, and demonstrate extensive knowledge of the literature. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

KIN 564   Qualitative Research Methods   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduces students to qualitative methodology in the educational and health-related professions settings. Students will learn to interpret qualitative research, understand its theoretical underpinnings, acquire interviewing and observation skills, design and evaluate a community-based group research project, learn to collaborate with others, and critically assess the contributions to the project of self and peers.

KIN 565   Teaching in the Professoriate   credit: 4 Hours.

Provides scholarly knowledge and practical experience necessary for effectively assuming the roles of teaching, mentoring, and presenting in the professoriate. Students will team teach an undergraduate course with an assigned faculty mentor, give a scholarly research presentation, and attend a series of theoretically grounded lectures focusing on instructional design, learner characteristics, and successfully conveying information to others. Same as CHLH 565, RST 560, and SHS 565. Prerequisite: Must be a PhD student in the College of Applied Health Sciences.

KIN 590   Independent Study   credit: 2 or 4 Hours.

Independent research on special projects. May be repeated.

KIN 591   Seminar   credit: 1 Hour.

Lectures, discussions, and critiques on kinesiology and community health related subjects by faculty members and visiting professional leaders; presentation and criticism of student research. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated in subsequent terms as topics vary.

KIN 594   Special Topics   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Lecture course in topics of current interest; specific subject matter announced in the Schedule. May be repeated.

KIN 599   Thesis Research   credit: 0 to 16 Hours.

Preparation of theses in kinesiology. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated.