Political Science

Robert Pahre, Head of Department
420 David Kinley Hall, MC - 713, 1407 West Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL
PH: (217) 333-3881
http://www.pol.illinois.edu

The Department of Political Science helps students acquire a broad understanding of political science and to pursue selected subfields of the discipline in depth. To accomplish these objectives, the department provides courses of study that introduce students to the discipline and to its principal fields. These include American government and politics, comparative government and politics, international relations, and political philosophy. Supporting courses are an integral part of the program and should be selected with a view toward building a coherent selection adapted to the student's particular interests. 

The Department of Political Science, along with the European Union Center, offers a 5 year BALAS/MA in Political Science and European Union Studies.

The Civic Leadership Program

Students are admitted to the Civic Leadership Program through a competitive process administered by the Department of Political Science. The Civic Leadership Program offers a plan of study to enable students with the capacity, skills, and knowledge to provide informed, principled, and effective civic leadership. Students can participate either as Political Science Majors with a concentration in Civic Leadership or as majors in other fields with a Minor in Political and Civic Leadership. All students in the Civic Leadership Program must complete 17 hours of courses related to and distributed within the Civic Leadership Program. See the Civic Leadership concentration and Political and Civic Leadership minor for full information.

For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences

Major in Sciences and Letters Curriculum

Students must complete the Political Science Core Requirements and select one concentration in consultation with an academic adviser.

Political Science Core Requirements
PS 101Intro to US Gov & Pol3
Select three of the following:9
Intro to Political Science 1
Foundations of Pol Sci
Intro to Public Policy
Intro to Pol Research
Strategic Models
Intro to Comp Politics
Intro to Political Theory
Intro to Intl Relations
Concentration Requirements (Students must choose one concentration)38-40
Total Hours50-52
1

Credit is not given for PS 100 and PS 200.

Departmental distinction

To be eligible for distinction, a student majoring in Political Science must complete one of the following two tracks:

  1. Individual Study Track. On this track, a student must:
    1. Complete a senior thesis,
    2. Earn a political science major grade point average on this campus of at least 3.25 or higher, and
    3. Earn a grade point average in PS 496 of 3.67 or higher.
  2. Honors Program Track. On this track, a student must:
    1. Complete a senior thesis,
    2. Earn a political science major grade point average on this campus of at least 3.25 or higher,
    3. Be admitted to and maintain good standing within the departmental honors program, and
    4. Complete required coursework in the departmental honors program with a grade point average in PS 495 and PS 496 between 2.67 and 3.66.

Admission to the departmental honors program requires the following:

  1. Completion of PS 230 or PS 231 or an acceptable substitute,
  2. An on-campus political science major grade point average of 3.5,
  3. Completion of nine hours (including at least three advanced hours) of political science on this campus,
  4. Application and affirmative vote of a departmental committee.

High Distinction

To be eligible for high distinction, a student majoring in Political Science must:

  1. Complete a senior thesis,
  2. Earn a political science major grade point average on this campus of at least 3.25 or higher,
  3. Be admitted to and maintain good standing in the departmental honors program, and
  4. Complete required coursework in the departmental honors program with a grade point average in PS 495 and PS 496 of 3.67 or higher.

5 Year BALAS/MA in Political Science and European Union Studies

The Department of Political Science, in conjunction with the European Union Center, offers a 5-year BALAS /MA degree program in Political Science and the Master of Arts in European Union Studies (MAEUS). In order to be admitted to this degree program, students apply through a joint application process to their BALAS –granting program and the European Union Center during their third year of studies. Requirements for this degree program are identical to those for the stand-alone BALAS and for the stand-alone MAEUS. Students will receive both degrees when the requirements are met for the degrees; BALAS and MA degrees will be conferred separately and independently. More detailed information may be obtained from department and EUC offices.

PS Class Schedule

Courses

PS 100   Intro to Political Science   credit: 3 Hours.

Surveys the major concepts and approaches employed in the study of politics. Credit is not given for both PS 100 and PS 200.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

PS 101   Intro to US Gov & Pol   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the organization and development of national, state, and local governments in the U.S.; the federal system; the U.S. Constitutions; civil and political rights; the party system; and the nature, structure, powers, and procedures of national political institutions. This course may require limited participating as a subject in research.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

PS 125   Washington Experience   credit: 3 Hours.

An examination of political Washington and policymaking. Through visits to think tanks, nonprofit organizations and agencies we will examine the policymaking world in Washington and get to know different participants in this process, what they do, and how they interact and work to affect policy and express their ideas. This course is a required component of the Illinois in Washington Program. Prerequisite: Acceptance to and enrollment in the Illinois in Washington Program.

PS 152   The New Middle East   credit: 3 Hours.

Discussion of contemporary sociopolitical change and current events in the Middle East. We will explore the background to these events, the factors that are driving them, and the short-term and long-term implications for the region and the world. Course reflects diverse fields of study, including cultural studies, economics, education, history, law, linguistics, literature, media, religion, political science, and sociology. Same as SAME 152 and SOC 152.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Non-West
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

PS 180   IntroPolitics of Globalization   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to the politics of globalization; identification of the principal actors, properties, and patterns of the politics of globalization that distinguish global politics from other forms of politics between and within groups, communities, states, and international organizations. This course can be used to fulfill either Western or non-Western general education categories, but not both.

PS 191   Topics in Civic Leadership   credit: 1 or 2 Hours.

Examines public and political life from the perspective of public and political leaders. Topics include professional development, career narratives, and/or development or selection of opportunities for civic or public service. May be repeated in separate terms if topics to vary to a maximum of 3 hours.

PS 200   Foundations of Pol Sci   credit: 3 Hours.

Surveys the social scientific approach to the study of politics. Credit is not given for both PS 200 and PS 100.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

PS 201   US Racial & Ethnic Politics   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines efforts by racial and ethnic communities to organize politically and by society to allocate resources based on race or ethnicity. Topical focus includes African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, Native Americans, and white ethnics. The primary goal of the course is to develop a more comprehensive understanding of racial and ethnic politics by identifying commonalities and differences among these groups and their relationship to the state. Same as AAS 201, AFRO 201, and LLS 201.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci
Cultural Studies - US Minority

PS 202   Religion & Politics in the US   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines how religion and politics influence each other in the United States, both historically and in contemporary society.

PS 220   Intro to Public Policy   credit: 3 Hours.

Surveys the policy process including adoption, implementation, and evaluation. Topics may include reviews of substantive policy issues such as crime, energy, environment, poverty, foreign policy, civil liberties, or economic regulation. Prerequisite: PS 100 or PS 101, or consent of instructor.

PS 222   Ethics and Public Policy   credit: 3 Hours.

Examination of the moral issues in public policy that arise in a in a democratic setting, utilizing conceptual tools from political and moral theory to evaluate policy decisions involving means and ends between conflicting goals. Prerequisite: PS 100, PS 101, or consent of instructor.

PS 224   Politics of the National Parks   credit: 2 or 3 Hours.

Examines the politics of national parks in the United States, including creation of parks, local support or opposition to parks, and park policy as well as policy questions such as the value of wilderness ecosystem management, endangered species protection, and role of parks in national identity and remembrance of events such as the Civil War, the Indian wars, or the civil rights movement. Same as RST 224. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 10 hours.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

PS 225   Environmental Politics & Policy   credit: 3 Hours.

Examinations of the political, economic, ecological, and cultural trade-offs between the use and the preservation of the environment, with particular emphasis on the preservation of land and water resources in national parks, forests, and other reserved lands. Same as RST 225.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

PS 230   Intro to Pol Research   credit: 3 Hours.

Surveys the principles that guide empirical research in political science; emphasizes definition of research problems, principles and practices of measurement, use of data as evidence, and data analysis. Prerequisite: PS 100 or PS 101, or consent of instructor.

PS 231   Strategic Models   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduces strategic models of political behavior and their implications for our understanding of politics. Uses simple models, inspired by game theory, to examine fundamental political questions.

PS 240   Intro to Comp Politics   credit: 3 Hours.

Surveys the basic concepts and principles of political analysis from a comparative perspective.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

PS 241   Comp Politics in Dev Nations   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides comparative and historical insights into the problems affecting the developing world by examining social, economic and political changes in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Non-West
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

PS 242   Introduction to Modern Africa   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as AFST 222, ANTH 222, and SOC 222. See AFST 222.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Non-West

PS 243   Pan Africanism   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides an introduction to Pan African political movements and ideologies from the Americas to continental Africa. Examines the political, social, economic, and ideological relationships and connections between Africans and their descendants in the diaspora from an historical and comparative perspective. Same as AFRO 243, AFST 243, and SOC 267.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Non-West
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

PS 270   Intro to Political Theory   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduces the nature, structure, and purposes of political theory; examines major works on the problems of political order, obedience, justice, liberty, and representation to distinguish and clarify different theoretical approaches.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities ? Hist & Phil

PS 272   Women and Politics   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the political status and roles of women. Topics include women's political behavior; feminist and anti-feminist politics; and contemporary legislative and public policy issues, such as educational equity, equal rights legislation, and health care delivery for women. Same as GWS 272.

PS 273   Environment and Society   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as ESE 287, GEOG 287, NRES 287, and SOC 287. See NRES 287.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci
Cultural Studies - Western

PS 280   Intro to Intl Relations   credit: 3 Hours.

Structure and processes of international relations, trends in international politics, and the future of the international system. Credit is not given for both PS 280 and PS 281.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

PS 281   Intro to Intl Relations-ACP   credit: 3 Hours.

This course is identical to PS 280 except for the additional writing component that fulfills the campus' advanced composition requirement. Credit is not given for both PS 280 and PS 281. Prerequisite: Completion of campus Composition I general education requirement.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Advanced Composition
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

PS 282   Governing Globalization   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the historical, socio-economic, political, and moral dimensions associated with the rise of a global society and its governance. Prerequisite: Completion of campus Composition I general education requirement; completion of one course in a social science or consent of instructor.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Advanced Composition
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

PS 283   Intro to Intl Security   credit: 3 Hours.

Surveys the major issues associated with arms control, disarmament and international security. Also examines the military, socio-economic, and political dimensions of weapons systems, military strategy, the ethics of modern warfare, nuclear proliferation, and regional security issues. Same as GLBL 283.

PS 289   Politics of the Vietnam War   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines questions about the war in Vietnam and the era during which it was fought. Focuses on official policy questions, such as the decision making process, the legality of the war, the question of war crimes, and lessons for international relations. Domestic issues, such as the rise and effect of the antiwar movement, are also discussed. Prerequisite: Allen Hall residency or consent of Unit One director.

PS 299   Study Abroad   credit: 0 to 18 Hours.

Lectures, seminars, and practical work in an approved study-abroad program in Political Science, appropriate to the student's course of study. Approved for letter and S/U grading. May be repeated to a maximum of 34 hours per academic year. Prerequisite: Overall GPA 2.75, 3.00 grade point average in Political Science, admission to approved program.

PS 300   Special Topics   credit: 3 Hours.

Selected readings and research in political science. See Class Schedule for current topics. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours if topics vary. Prerequisite: Six hours of political science, or consent of instructor.

PS 301   The US Constitution I   credit: 3 Hours.

Analyzes issues related to judicial interpretation of the constitution; the separation of governmental powers; federalism; checks and balances among the three branches of the national government; and the jurisdiction of federal courts. Prerequisite: PS 101, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 302   The US Constitution II   credit: 3 Hours.

Analyzes issues involved in free speech, freedom of religion, rights of the criminally accused, and government's responsibility to protect persons from discrimination based on race or sexual preference. Pays special attention to the role of law and judges. Prerequisite: PS 101, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 303   The US Congress   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the legislative function in government; the structure and organization of Congress; legislative procedures; pressure groups and lobbying; the relation of legislature to other branches of government; and problems of legislative reorganization. Prerequisite: PS 101, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 304   The US Presidency   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the multiple roles of the president; the determinants and growth of presidential influence; presidential decision making; the president's role in the formulation and implementation of public policy; and the president's multiple constituencies. Prerequisite: PS 101, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 305   The US Supreme Court   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines how the modern Supreme Court resolves major issues in American constitutional politics. Prerequisite: PS 101, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor; PS 301 or PS 302.

PS 306   Judicial Politics   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to the study of courts and judges as political institutions and actors. Focuses primarily on federal courts in the United States, but also covers courts in the American states. Addresses topics such as how judges are selected; who or what determines which cases are heard; the influence of ideology and the law on judges' decisions; the relationships that exist between the courts in the judiciary; the role of the president and the Senate in judicial decisions; and judges' decisions that run contrary to the public's wishes. Prerequisite: PS 101.

PS 307   Separation of Powers   credit: 3 Hours.

Explores how the checks and balances built into the US Constitution affect the interactions between the Executive, Legislative, and Judicial branches. Addresses topics such as whether Congress is less productive during times of divided government; why some presidential nominees sail through confirmation, while others take years to be confirmed; and whether Supreme Court justices pay attention to the preferences of the President and Congress when deciding cases. Prerequisite: PS 101.

PS 308   Politics, Policy & Regulation   credit: 3 Hours.

Explores how federal agencies (e. g., the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Department of Defense) shape national policy. Provides students with a background in the concepts and ideas that political scientists use in the study of the federal bureaucracy, and motivates further study of political institutions. Students will use traditional political science and legal texts to analyze contemporary policy problems. Prerequisite: PS 101.

PS 309   State Gov in the US   credit: 3 Hours.

Surveys the origins and evolution of state government in the United States. Topics include history, structure and dynamics of state governments, laws and the judiciary, state legislatures, political parties, organized interests, bureaucracies, demographic change and electoral patterns, and political conflicts, and coalitions. Prerequisite: PS 101, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 310   Politics of Organizations   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to the study of public organizations with a focus on formal political organizations including parties, legislatures, and bureaucracies. In-depth analysis of two of the main problems confronted by organizations: collective action problems and delegation problems. Students will acquire an understanding of these problems as well as different ways in which they can be addressed. A strong emphasis is also placed on developing the analytical skills necessary for informed analysis of political interactions involving formal organizations. Prerequisite: PS 101, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 311   Political Parties in the US   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the organization and operation of the American party system; national, state, and local organizations and their interactions; the convention and primary systems; and campaign methods and finance. Prerequisite: PS 101, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 312   Politics and the Media   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the processes of mass-mediated political communication in democratic societies. Special emphasis will be given to the role of news media in democratic theory, factors shaping the construction of news such as journalism routines, media economics, and the strategic management of news by political elites. Same as CMN 325 and MACS 322.

PS 313   Congress and Foreign Policy   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines cases of foreign-policy making over 100 years with a focus on the struggle between the legislative and executive branches, constitutional questions, explanations for changes in behavior, and the impact on democratic process. Prerequisite: PS 101, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 314   Political Psychology   credit: 3 Hours.

Explores the psychological processes that underlie political attitudes and behaviors. Specifically, we will take theories from social, personality, cognitive, and evolutionary psychology and apply them to political phenomena. Topics will include how politics is affected by cognitive biases, emotions, persuasion, social influence, identity, prejudice and discrimination, personality, and evolution and genetics. We will also explore what we can learn about basic human psychology by studying politics carefully. Prerequisite: PS 101.

PS 315   African American Politics   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the role of race in stimulating change in American political life; types of strategies employed in the civil rights struggle; how race affects electoral participation and the broader political and economic conditions of African Americans. Same as AFRO 315. Prerequisite: PS 101, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 316   Latina/Latino Politics   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the role of Latino electorates in shaping state and national politics. Reviews the histories of Latino national origin groups, examines public policy issues of concern to Latinos, successes and failures of Latino empowerment strategies, and the electoral impact of Latino votes. Focus will be primarily on Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, and Cuban Americans and an assessment of the degree to which their political agendas are likely to merge over the coming years. Same as LLS 316. Prerequisite: PS 101, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 317   Asian American Politics   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of the role of Asian Americans in the American political system. Topics include: the international context of emigration, the history of different Asian groups in the U.S., demographic patterns, issues of identity, classification, and pan-ethnicity, voting behavior, minority representation, and public policy. Same as AAS 317. Prerequisite: PS 101, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 318   Interests Grps & Soc Movements   credit: 3 Hours.

Focuses on two important forces in American politics that provide ways for citizens to affect public policy: interests groups and social movements. Examination of organized interest groups, including their organization, growth, activity, and impact in American politics. Examines the formation and role of social movements. Prerequisite: PS 101, or six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 319   Campaigns and Elections   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the dynamics of United States congressional and presidential campaigns, including electoral rules, campaign organization and finance, candidate strategy, role of parties, interest groups, and the media, campaign effects, and proposals for reform. Prerequisite: PS 101 or six hours of Political Sciences credit.

PS 320   Public Opinion   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the nature of public opinion in contemporary American politics. Considers the extent to which public opinion is organized by ideology, values, party identification and other group-related identities. Will analyze both the sources and consequences of public opinion and the nature of public support for democracy and democratic institutions. Will investigate the relationship between public opinion and policymaking. Prerequisite: PS 101.

PS 321   Principles of Public Policy   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines different approaches to evaluating the performance of public sector organizations, including private sector accountability principles. Focuses on how to improve the performance of governmental agencies, as well as corporate social responsibility. Same as ACCY 321, ACE 321, and BADM 303. Prerequisite: PS 101, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 322   Law and Public Policy   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the nature of law, law makers, and law appliers; the determinants of law-making; and the societal impact of law. Prerequisite: PS 101, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 323   Law and Representation   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines political and legal policies related to electoral representation including constitutional protections of voting rights and related topics such as a gerrymandering, vote counting, majority minority districts, and the Voting Rights Act. Prerequisite: PS 101 or six hours of Political Science or consent of instructor.

PS 328   Introduction to Biology and Politics   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the biological processes that underlie political attitudes and behaviors. Specifically, we will take theories from behavioral and molecular genetics, psychophysiology, neuroscience, and evolutionary psychology and apply them to political attitudes and behaviors. Topics will include how evolutionary adaptations shape political life, how genes affect political traits, the effects of physiological differences on how people experience the political world, and what political insights can be drawn from studying differences in brain structures and functioning. Prerequisite: PS 101.

PS 329   Immigration & Citizenship   credit: 3 Hours.

Examination of the conceptual issues associated with citizenship and immigration, considering current political debates from a variety of perspectives: empirical, historical, and normative. Focuses on the United States but will also examine the immigration and citizenship processes of other nations as well. Among topics considered: why people migrate; consequences of migration; efforts to integrate immigrants; public opinion, citizenship traditions and rationales; membership; belonging, and national identify; post national citizenship. Prerequisites: PS 101, 6 hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 330   Intro to Political Behavior   credit: 3 Hours.

Analyzes the relationship between political attitudes and public opinion formation. The course also discusses political participation, political tolerance, and attitudes toward political leaders. Prerequisite: POLS 101, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 331   Intro to Electoral Behavior   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the social, psychological and institutional determinants of individual voting decisions. Prerequisite: POLS 101, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 339   Political Violence   credit: 3 Hours.

Survey of various forms of political violence and examination of competing theories about why these types of political violence occur and their implications. The different "categories" of violence under examination constitute pressing topics in the study of conflict in both international relations and comparative politics. These categories, which may overlap conceptually or empirically, include phenomena such as mass collective action in protests, riots, repression and torture, coups, civil war and insurgency, genocide and massacres, sexual violence during war, self sacrifice, and terrorism. Prerequisite: PS 240 or PS 241 or PS 280, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 340   Politics in Intl Development   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the ways in which the wealthy countries of the world, international organizations and non-governmental organizations have tried to catalyze or facilitate economic and human development in the poorer countries of the world. Prerequisite: PS 240 or PS 241 or PS 281, or six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 341   Gov & Pol in Africa   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines contemporary economic, social, and political processes in Africa, focusing on three basic explanatory themes: historical patterns of development; emerging patterns of class and interest; and leadership strategies. Same as AFRO 341. Prerequisite: PS 240 or PS 241, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 343   Gov & Pol of China   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduces the government and politics of modern China. Same as EALC 343. Prerequisite: PS 240 or PS 241, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 345   Gov & Pol of SE Asia   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides a comparative analysis of the political development of the countries of Southeast Asia. Emphasis is placed on differing approaches to the governance and public policy formation, as well as economic, social, historical, and cultural influences on political development. Prerequisite: PS 240 or PS 241, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 346   Gov & Pol of South Asia   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides a comparative analysis of the political development of India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and other nations in South Asia. Emphasis is placed on the differing approaches to governance and public policy formation, as well as the economic, social, historical, geographical and cultural influences on political development. Same as ASST 346. Prerequisite: PS 240 or PS 241, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 347   Gov & Pol of Middle East   credit: 3 Hours.

Analyzes the transformation of Middle Eastern society from Morocco to Iran, as case studies in political modernization. The politics of the area are studied with special reference to causes and character of modernization, role of leadership, ideologies and institutions, methods and theories for analyzing political systems undergoing fundamental transformation, and implications for U. S. policy. Same as ASST 347. Prerequisite: PS 240 or PS 241, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 348   Gov & Pol in Western Europe   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the major governmental systems of continental Europe; the evolution, structure, and functioning of the political institutions of France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, and the Scandinavian countries. Prerequisite: PS 240 or PS 241, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 351   Gov & Pol Post-Soviet States   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the evolution, structure, and functioning of post-Soviet governments. Prerequisite: PS 240 or PS 241, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 352   Gov & Pol of East Europe   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the collapse of communism and efforts to develop capitalism and democracy. Special emphasis is given to national conflict and European integration. Prerequisite: PS 240 or PS 241, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 353   Gov & Pol of Latin America   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the origin and development of Latin American political institutions. Prerequisite: PS 240 or PS 241, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 355   Democratization   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the global process of democratization, with special attention to gains and failures in selected areas since 1974. Prerequisite: PS 240 or PS 241, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 356   Comparative Political Economy   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the effect of domestic political processes on economic performance, including monetary, fiscal, and trade policies. Topics include partisan influences on policy, interest group intermediation, political accountability for economic outcomes, and consequences of product and capital market internationalization. Same as GLBL 356. Prerequisite: PS 240 or PS 241, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 357   Ethnic Conflict   credit: 3 Hours.

Explores the bases of nationalist and ethnic identities across a variety of different national and cultural contexts, and how these are related to conflict at the intrastate and interstate levels. Consideration is given to the characteristics and patterns of ethnic conflict with special emphasis on how and when ethnic tensions become manifested in violent conflict. The course concludes with consideration and evaluations of various domestic and international approaches to conflict management and resolution. Same as GLBL 357. Prerequisite: PS 240 or PS 241, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Advanced Composition

PS 358   Comparative Political Behavior   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines themes of political behavior such as political participation, electoral politics, political culture, and contentious politics from a cross-national perspective. Prerequisite: PS 240, or PS 241, or six hours of Political Science credit.

PS 371   Classical Political Theory   credit: 3 Hours.

Considers the major works of Greek and Roman political theory, stressing their relevance to modern political analysis and action. Prerequisite: PS 270, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 372   Modern Political Theory   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides critical analysis of political theories from the fifteenth century to the present. The discussions focus on topics such as the development of conceptions of human nature, the role of the state, justice, legitimacy, obligation, individual rights, equality, and mechanisms of maintenance and change. Prerequisite: PS 270, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 373   Democratic Theory   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines theories of the nature and conditions of democracy; compares and analyzes contemporary democratic institutions. Prerequisite: PS 270, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 374   Future Politics   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines visions of the future drawn from science fiction literature as a way to engage with political and social theory and to cultivate the political imagination. Prerequisite: Six hours of political science credit or consent of instructor.

PS 376   American Political Theory   credit: 3 Hours.

Surveys American political thought from colonial times to the present. Prerequisite: PS 270, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 377   Topics Contemp Pol Theory   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines specific topics and writers of contemporary political theory. Recent themes have included conceptions of power, rights, justice, and radical political thought. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 hours. Prerequisite: PS 270, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 378   Topics Non-Western Pol Thought   credit: 3 Hours.

Considers political thought outside of the Greco-Roman, European, and North American tradition. May be repeated if topics vary. Prerequisite: PS 270, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 379   Intl Rel & Domestic Politics   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines conceptual linkages between international relations and domestic politics. Emphasizes theoretical explanations of and empirical evidence for these linkages. Prerequisite: PS 280 or PS 281, or six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 380   International Cooperation   credit: 3 Hours.

A study of cooperation among states. Cooperation dilemmas and their solutions, with focus on institutional arrangements that are aimed to facilitate cooperation among states. Prerequisite: PS 280 or PS 281, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 382   Intl Political Economy   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the interaction between international politics and economics; locates ideologies and practices in the context of international economic relations. Considers such topics as international trade, the global monetary order, multi-national corporations, economic aid relationships, and food and energy politics. Prerequisite: PS 280 or PS 283, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 384   Politics of Globalization   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the basic concepts and politics associated with the emergence of the global society. This course evaluates divergent theoretical explanations for the emergence of global politics, as well as how and why the global society governs itself. It examines the strengths and shortcomings of the nation-state, markets, and democratization as responses to the imperatives of order, welfare, and legitimacy. Prerequisite: PS 280 or PS 283, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 385   Politics of the European Union   credit: 3 Hours.

Considers the history of the European Union and its current functions and operations. Focuses on the ongoing process of political and cultural integration. Consists of sections in Illinois and abroad, interacting extensively via the worldwide web. Same as EURO 385, FR 385, and GER 385. Prerequisite: PS 240 or PS 241, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor; cross-listings require language training appropriate for enrollment in the respective overseas programs.

PS 386   International Law   credit: 3 Hours.

Analyzes the concepts and bases of public international law. Topics include sources and subjects of international law, as well as issues of jurisdiction, territory, law of the sea, and use of military force. Prerequisite: PS 280 or PS 283, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 387   National Security Policy   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines principal theories of international security and evaluates their capacity to explain the security behavior of states and other key international actors. Prerequisite: PS 280 or PS 283, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 390   American Foreign Policy   credit: 3 Hours.

Considers the major foreign policy decisions currently confronting the United States government: analyzes their background, principal issues, and alternative actions, as well as the policy formulation process. Prerequisite: PS 280 or PS 283, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 391   Soviet & Post-Sov Foreign Pol   credit: 3 Hours.

Surveys Soviet and Post-Soviet foreign policy from 1917 to the present, with emphasis upon the forces shaping this policy; special attention to the interplay of ideology and national interest in policy formulation. Prerequisite: PS 280 or PS 283, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 392   Intl Organizations&Regionalism   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines regionalism and regional international organizations and their consequences for multilateralisim cooperation, and conflict. Prerequisite: PS 280.

PS 393   Diplomatic Studies Practicum   credit: 4 Hours.

Practical introduction to the study of international organizations, consisting of three parts: academic modules in Urbana-Champaign; guest lectures and site visits in Vienna, Austria, and field trips TBA; and a final research paper based on fieldwork in Vienna, extending into late June. Enrollment requires prior admission to the Vienna Diplomatic Program.

PS 394   Crisis Diplomacy   credit: 3 Hours.

A comparative study of foreign policy decision-making and diplomacy among the major states from 1816-1948 with a focus on crisis bargaining, management, and escalation. Foreign relations of Britain, France, Germany, Russia, Italy, Japan, and the United States are covered in light of international relations theories. Emphasis is placed on how domestic political struggles, like those between hard liners and accommodationists, and external factors, like alliances and international norms, affect decision-making. Comparisons are made between those crises that are peacefully settled and those that escalate to war and/or get out of control. Prerequisite: PS 280, PS 281, PS 283, or consent of instructor.

PS 395   International Organization   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the development of basic principles underlying world organization; also considers the principles, structure, methods, and operation of international governmental institutions. Gives special attention to the United Nations and related agencies and to their evolution from the League of Nations system. Credit is not given for both PS 383 and PS 395. Prerequisite: PS 280 or PS 281 or PS 283, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 396   International Conflict   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the conditions that promote war and peace between states. General topics covered are: historical patterns in warfare; causes of war, including arms races and power distributions; outcomes of war; and approaches to peace. Credit is not given for both PS 381 and PS 396. Prerequisite: PS 280 or PS 281 or PS 283, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor.

PS 397   Authoritarian Regimes   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the various aspects of the politics in authoritarian regimes: their emergence and breakdown, the policy choices and institutions typically adopted, leadership change, and the theories that explain them. Historical case studies and statistical data will be used to examine real-world cases. Prerequisite: PS 240 or PS 241; or six hours of Political Sciences credit; or consent of instructor.

PS 398   Strategic Interntl Relations   credit: 3 Hours.

Examination of basic concepts and tools for analyzing foreign policy and understanding international politics and economy. Simple game-theoretic models will be used to explore the logic and the mechanisms behind key policy issues in international economy, cooperation, security, and institutions. Prerequisite: PS 280 or PS 281; or six hours of Political Sciences credit; or consent of instructor.

PS 399   Politics of International Treaties   credit: 3 Hours.

Treaties are agreements between sovereign states governed by international law. This course examines why countries commit to treaties and why they comply with them. It will provide advanced undergraduate students with the opportunity to read a range of scholarly works on international agreements and to conduct their own research on related topics. Prerequisite: PS 280.

PS 410   Neighborhoods and Politics   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Introduction to the social and political impacts of neighborhood life through readings, discussion, and field work. The political theories of local social networks, social ecology, the social context, third places, the physical form, and public space are examined. Students do library research and field work examining theories of social capital, civic engagement, new urbanism, public space, social context and urban form. Same as HDES 410. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: PS 100 or PS 101 or consent of instructor.

PS 456   Democracy and Identity   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

A normative and empirical examination of the special issues surrounding the development and maintenance of democracy in plural societies. Analyzes the impact of racial, ethnic and religious diversity on citizenship, civil rights, political institutions and public policy, as well as on democratic stability more generally, in established and newly emergent democracies. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PS 457   Dem Gov in a Global Setting   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examination of the basic concepts and politics associated with the emergence of a global society. Students evaluate competing explanations for the emergence of this new politics and how and why the global society governs itself. It examines the strengths and weaknesses of the nation-state, markets, and democratization as responses, respectively, to the imperatives or order, welfare, and legitimacy in the governance of world's peoples and states. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PS 490   Individual Study   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Special topics not treated in regularly scheduled courses; designed primarily for juniors and seniors. 1 to 4 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Evidence of adequate preparation for such study; consent of faculty member supervising the work; and approval of the department head.

PS 491   Internship   credit: 0 to 6 Hours.

Students follow a program of study and research related to an approved internship under the direction of the internship director and/or a faculty sponsor. Consult departmental undergraduate advisor or internship director. 0 to 6 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Approved for Letter and S/U grading. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 undergraduate hours. Prerequisite: 45 credit hours completed, one year in residence at an institution of higher learning, minimum 2.5 grade point average, coursework related to the internship, and acceptance to the internship director or undergraduate director and by faculty sponsor. Students enrolled in internship courses may not register for more than 18 hours total for all courses during the semester of the internship course.

PS 492   UG Research Assistance   credit: 0 to 3 Hours.

Assist departmental faculty in on-going research. Topics and nature of assistance vary. Capstone paper required. 0 to 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 6 hours. Credit is not given for more than nine hours toward completion of the political science major from any combination of PS 490, PS 491, and/or PS 492. Prerequisite: Evidence of adequate preparation for such study; consent of faculty member supervising the work; and approval of the department head.

PS 494   Junior Honors Seminar   credit: 3 Hours.

Research, reading, and discussion in selected topics and works in literature of political science. A major research project is required in preparation for PS 495. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 6 hours if topics vary. Credit is not given for non-honors courses and honors seminar on the same topic. Prerequisite: Admission to Political Science Honors Program or consent of department.

PS 495   Senior Honors Seminar   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides an advanced overview of methodological issues in political science especially identification of research questions and design of research strategies in political science appropriate for a senior thesis. Requires completion of a substantial research proposal. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Credit is not given for more than six hours towards any combination of PS 495 and PS 496. Neither PS 495 nor PS 496 counts towards the 30 hours required for completion of the political science major. Prerequisite: Admissions to Political Science Honors Program or consent of instructor.

PS 496   Senior Honors Thesis   credit: 2 to 6 Hours.

2 to 6 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Written consent of instructor of department approval; open only to seniors whose major is political science and who have a general University grade point of 3.0.