Anthropology

Virginia Dominguez
109 Davenport Hall, 607 South Mathews, Urbana
PH: (217) 333-3616
http://www.anthro.illinois.edu/

The Department of Anthropology offers four major concentrations and a minor. In addition, students may pursue Anthropology as part of the LAS Major in Computer Science and Anthropology.

Anthropology combines scientific and humanistic interests in human biology and diverse cultures (both past and present) to provide in-depth knowledge and broad perspectives on the human condition.  The anthropology major develops research, writing and analytical skills that enable graduates to confront problems, issues and situations that require understanding of cultural differences and human biological variation.  College graduates with a background in anthropology thrive in a broad range of jobs and professions including global/international relations, social work, education, law, medicine and health professions, bioscience and technology, government, NGOs and business, as well as further graduate study in anthropology.  

Professional anthropologists work as research scientists and teachers in museums, universities, and archaeological surveys; as staff members in government agencies, social service programs, and business firms in which international understanding of human and social concerns is important; or as independent consultants to such agencies, programs, and firms.

The Archaeology Concentration offers students a program to explore the human past through its material remains to understand cultural and societal change through time, and the role of heritage in the present. We offer many opportunities for students to conduct research with faculty in our archaeology labs, field schools, and in our extensive research collections.

The General Anthropology Concentration includes all four fields of anthropology: 

  • biological anthropology (biological diversity and evolutionary history of human and nonhuman primates),
  • archaeology (human prehistory and the organization and growth of technology and society),
  • sociocultural anthropology (daily life at home and abroad; identity and power in social contexts),
  • linguistic anthropology (language and communication in cultural contexts). 

Although the student should strive for a topical and geographical balance, an undergraduate may specialize in one of these four branches and may also study a world cultural area intensively through an area studies program.

The Human Evolutionary Biology Concentration offers students a program to examine the interconnections between genetics, environment and culture to address issues from human origins and morphology to forensics and modern health.

The Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology Concentration offers students a program of more focused coursework in these closely related fields. Sociocultural anthropologists study the daily lives of people around the world, both at home and abroad. They conduct field research to get a hands-on feel for people’s lives and passions and examine everything from beauty pageants to political protest marches, from Disney films to the lab practices of nuclear scientists. Sociocultural anthropology distinguishes itself from other disciplines by its conviction that these local and personal details offer a crucial window on the largest processes and problems of our time, from globalization to race relations and violence.

Linguistic anthropology complements sociocultural anthropology with detailed attention to spoken and signed languages—their structure and use in the daily lives of people around the world, both at home and abroad. Linguistic anthropologists examine such things as the “English Only" movement in the United States, the persuasive language of advertising and politics, racism and hate speech, oral/gestural storytelling traditions around the world, communication in the classroom, on social media, or at the United Nations, as well as how the way we talk creates our sense of self and reality.

Because the field of anthropology presents a wide range of disciplinary perspectives on the human condition, students electing this major concentration are encouraged to select from among relevant course offerings in archaeology or biological anthropology to fulfill General Education requirements.

For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences

Major in Sciences and Letters Curriculum

Students must select one of the following concentrations in consultation with an advisor:

Minor in Anthropology

The minor in anthropology may be tailored to each student's individual needs, thus accommodating students with interests as diverse as premedicine, prelaw, geography, and art history.

E-mail: anthro@illinois.edu

Web address for department: http://www.anthro.illinois.edu

Select at least two of the following:6
Introduction to Archaeology
Sociocultural Anthropology
Biological Anthropology
Language in Culture
Minimum of six hours of 300- or 400-level courses. Only 3 hours of ANTH 499 may be used to fulfill this requirement.6
Anthropology courses at any level 6
Total Hours18

ANTH Class Schedule

Anthropology Courses

ANTH 101   Introduction to Anthropology   credit: 3 Hours.

Anthropology was first envisioned as a holistic discipline, combining insights from the study of human anatomy and evolution, research on material remains of human settlements, and the analysis of social interaction in language and other cultural practices. Following this tradition, this course explores the questions about where humans came from, how societies live and communicate, and why human cultural groups vary. This course can be used to fulfill either Western or non-Western general education categories, but not both.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Non-West
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci
Cultural Studies - Western

ANTH 102   Human Origins and Culture   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduction to human evolutionary biology focusing on the biological processes responsible for our evolution. Draws on a diverse range of disciplines- evolutionary biology, population genetics, comparative anatomy, primatology, archaeology, geology and paleoecology to provide context for interpreting the fossil and archaeological evidence for humans' biological origin and evolution and early cultural change.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

ANTH 103   Anthro in a Changing World   credit: 3 Hours.

Presents the fundamental areas of anthropological analysis through a series of comparative cases that emphasize social and cultural relations in global contexts. Directs attention to the anthropological history of global empires and colonial states, their cultural exchanges, and contemporary studies of culture, society, and globalization. This course can be used to fulfill either Western or non-Western general education categories, but not both.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Non-West
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci
Cultural Studies - Western

ANTH 104   Talking Culture   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to linguistic anthropology, focusing on the role of language in the creation and maintenance of society and culture and on a person's concept of self within that culture. Demonstrates how language use within a community can serve as the foundation for the analysis of cultural practices. Same as LING 104.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

ANTH 105   World Archaeology   credit: 3 Hours.

Using archaeological data, traces our prehistoric heritage and the processes which led to the evolution of agriculture, settled villages, and civilization in many areas of the world. Lectures range from the earliest Homo sapiens to Sumeria, Egypt, Mexico, Peru, and the United States.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Hist & Phil

ANTH 106   Hist Arch Americas   credit: 3 Hours.

Explores recent theoretical, methodological, and thematic developments in historical archaeology in North America and the Caribbean. The temporal coverage is 1500-1900 AD. Examines how historical archaeologists use artifactual, documentary and oral history evidence in interpreting the past, and how historical archaeology can contribute to our understanding of the ways by which material culture can be used to study race, class, gender, and ethnic identities. Same as AFRO 106.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Hist & Phil
Cultural Studies - US Minority

ANTH 108   Religion & Society in West I   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as JS 108, PHIL 108, REL 108, and SOC 108. See REL 108.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Hist & Phil
Cultural Studies - Western

ANTH 109   Religion & Society in West II   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as PHIL 109, REL 109, and SOC 109. See REL 109.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Hist & Phil
Cultural Studies - Western

ANTH 130   History of South Asia   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as HIST 130. See HIST 130.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Hist & Phil
Cultural Studies - Non-West

ANTH 143   Biology of Human Behavior   credit: 3 Hours.

Critical consideration of data and information bearing on current controversies and ideas concerning selected aspects of human behavior. Topics to be discussed include communication; social organization; and parental, sexual, and aggressive behavior. Same as HDFS 143.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Nat Sci & Tech - Life Sciences

ANTH 157   The Archaeology of Illinois   credit: 3 Hours.

Traces the prehistory of Illinois from the first entry of people into the region more than 113,000 years ago until the 17th century and the beginning of historical records; examines subsequent cultural changes up to the 19th century and statehood from an archaeological and ethnohistorical perspective.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Hist & Phil

ANTH 160   Contemporary Social Issues   credit: 3 Hours.

Course considers how anthropological theory and methods enhance our understanding of contemporary social and political issues, including immigration, education, affirmative action, and welfare. It examines the relationship between social policy and social science as well as the strengths and limits of anthropological methods for social and political issues.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - US Minority

ANTH 165   Lang & Culture Native North Am   credit: 3 Hours.

Develops understanding of the rich diversity of languages and cultures found among Native North American peoples from the perspectives of sociocultural and linguistic anthropology. Same as AIS 165.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Non-West

ANTH 175   Archaeology and Pop Culture   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the ways in which the ancient past has been interpreted, appropriated, represented, used, and misused for a variety of reasons by political parties, national governments, and religious and ethnic groups living in the present.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Hist & Phil

ANTH 180   The Archaeology of Death   credit: 3 Hours.

Cross-cultural introduction to the celebration of death across time and space. Examines the anthropological and archaeological literature on death, particularly in terms of death ritual and burial practices. Students study popular films on death in different cultures, and carry out a field project at a local cemetery.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci
Cultural Studies - Western

ANTH 182   Latin American Cultures   credit: 4 Hours.

Latin America considered as a theater of conflict and cultural experimentation among Native American, African, and Iberian peoples; their survival and transformation as reported in selected ethnographies and eyewitness sources; and some modern theories and controversies about their experience.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Non-West
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

ANTH 209   Food, Culture, and Society   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduces basic anthropological and sociological methods, concepts and approaches to the study of the food. Explores issues including gender roles, religious influences, family relationships, community sharing, nationalist rituals, and global processes in the production, distribution and consumption of food. Film, ethnographies, and other social science studies will be examined. Same as SOC 269.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

ANTH 210   Families in Global Perspective   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as HDFS 220. See HDFS 220.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Non-West
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

ANTH 220   Introduction to Archaeology   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to the problems of studying past cultures; special attention given to the ranges of techniques available and the adequacy of various methodologies as bases for sound inference about the structure of extinct cultures. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 222   Introduction to Modern Africa   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as AFST 222, PS 242, and SOC 222. See AFST 222.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Non-West

ANTH 223   Exploring African Cities   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as LA 220. See LA 220.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Hist & Phil
Cultural Studies - Non-West

ANTH 224   Tourist Cities and Sites   credit: 3 Hours.

Examination of tourism's social, political, economic, cultural, and physical dimensions from an anthropological perspective.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

ANTH 225   Women in Prehistory   credit: 3 Hours.

Course identifies the presence of women in the archaeological record and seeks to reconstruct women's lives and roles in a range of ancient societies. It also considers the intellectual history of gender studies in archaeology and anthropology. Same as GWS 225.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

ANTH 230   Sociocultural Anthropology   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to the anthropological study of contemporary human societies; emphasis on the comparative study of social organization, interpersonal relations, cultural ecology, and processes of sociocultural change, but also includes some consideration of the method and theory of ethnographic field research.

ANTH 240   Biological Anthropology   credit: 3 Hours.

Past and present evolution of the human species and population and individual biological variation; topics include genetic principles relevant to human evolution, primate phylogeny and behavior, fossil evidence for human evolution, and the origin and significance of biological diversity in modern humans. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or ANTH 143; or an introductory life sciences course; or consent of instructor.

ANTH 241   Human Biological Variation   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the biological concept of race as applied and misapplied to Homo sapiens by anthropologists and others from the 18th century to the present and of the origin, nature, and significance of so-called racial variation.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Nat Sci & Tech - Life Sciences

ANTH 242   History of Human Evolution   credit: 3 Hours.

Reviews the history of evolution and its controversies from the pre-Darwinians to contemporary debates. Examines disciplinary and wider societal debates and how they affect each other.

ANTH 243   Sociality of the Great Apes   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the social organization, mating patterns, and group structure of free-ranging chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans. Presents historical perspective focusing on misconceptions that have colored our understanding of ape social behavior; addresses questions concerned with learning potential, food sharing, social cooperation, aggressive behavior, self-awareness, and the appropriateness of the apes as models for understanding human behavior. Prerequisite: ANTH 102, ANTH 143, or an equivalent course in animal behavior; or consent of instructor.

ANTH 246   Forensic Science   credit: 4 Hours.

History and theory underlying methods used in forensic science. Topics include the courtroom, the units of a crime laboratory, methods of securing and investigating a crime scene, and the analysis of evidence collected from a crime scene such as blood, fibers, hair and fingerprints.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Nat Sci & Tech - Life Sciences

ANTH 247   Forensic Science DNA Lab   credit: 3 Hours.

Forensic science is the application of science to the law and encompasses a wide variety of scientific disciplines. This course introduces students to general laboratory practice, molecular biology and DNA analysis skill that are commonly used by forensic DNA scientists. Students will learn using a ?hands-on? and interactive approach with many of the same tools used by professional forensic DNA scientists. Prerequisite: ANTH 246.

ANTH 249   Evolution and Human Disease   credit: 3 Hours.

Principles of modern evolutionary theory are applied to medical problems. Topics include: transmission, pathogen strategies, symptoms and spectrum of disease, evolution of virulence, concept of cause, antimicrobial resistance, emerging diseases, stress and adaptation, nutrition, diachronic overview of changing patterns of human disease, and ecological factors.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Nat Sci & Tech - Life Sciences

ANTH 250   The World Through Museums   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as MUSE 250. See MUSE 250.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci
Cultural Studies - Western

ANTH 258   Sex in Nature and Culture   credit: 3 Hours.

A simultaneous exploration of human sexuality from a biological and cultural perspective. Same as GWS 258.

ANTH 259   Latina/o Cultures   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to the Spanish-speaking population of the United States, including demography, history, economics, and culture; emphasis on Mexican-Americans and Puerto Ricans, although other Spanish-speaking groups are also considered. Same as LLS 259. Prerequisite: ANTH 103 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 261   Intro to the African Diaspora   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as AFRO 261. See AFRO 261.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Hist & Phil
Cultural Studies - US Minority

ANTH 262   Women's Lives   credit: 3 Hours.

Perceptions of women, their perceptions of themselves, and their varying roles and statuses in several contemporary societies in diverse countries; supervised ethnographic observation of women's behavior. Same as GWS 262.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

ANTH 266   African Film and Society   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to African cinema as a contemporary art form and as a window on the social and cultural realities of Africa. The course includes discussion of modern African culture, the African film industry, and African cinema as an art form and as popular entertainment. Same as AFST 266.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Non-West

ANTH 267   Memoirs of Africa   credit: 3 Hours.

Course introduces Africa to students who have read little or nothing about the continent, the course provides a "user-friendly" approach by offering engagingly written narratives of actual lives lived. The texts may be a combination of memoirs written by Africans (about their childhood experiences growing up in various regions of Africa) and by non-African scholars and other authors (including but not limited to anthropologists) who have spent significant amounts of time on the continent. Same as AFST 267. Prerequisite: Completion of Campus Composition I general requirement.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Advanced Composition
Cultural Studies - Non-West

ANTH 268   Images of the Other   credit: 3 Hours.

Do all peoples view neighboring or distant populations as radically different "Others," or can humans create mutual images based on a notion of shared humanity? Course compares and analyzes the range of images of ethnic, "racial," gender, class, and bodily differences that have been enacted historically and cross-culturally in both Western and non-Western populations. Prerequisite: A previous course in history and/or one of the social sciences suggested.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Advanced Composition
Humanities - Hist & Phil
Cultural Studies - Western

ANTH 270   Language in Culture   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the intersections of culture and language. Topics include the definition of language; the cultural shaping of narrative; how different linguistic systems guide speakers to think differently about the world; and how ideologies about language relate to beliefs about the nation, modernity, race, and gender. Credit is not given for both ANTH 270 and ANTH 271.

ANTH 271   Language in Culture-ACP   credit: 3 Hours.

Course is identical to ANTH 270 except for the additional writing component. Credit is not given for both ANTH 271 and ANTH 270. Prerequisite: Completion of campus Composition I general education requirement.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Advanced Composition

ANTH 277   Ancient Cities, Sacred Land   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines urban development from its origins to the present day. Among the concepts covered are urbanism, urbanization, ceremonial centers and ceremonial cities, the city as a system, the spatial and economic organization of cities, and the built environment (sacred landscapes, vernacular architecture, places of power). Small field project is conducted in Champaign-Urbana.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci
Cultural Studies - Western

ANTH 278   Climate Change & Civilization   credit: 3 Hours.

Examination of how climate change impacts society. With the increasing need to understand how climate changes and society intersect at present, it is becoming important that we address critical questions about how lessons from the past inform present needs. Case studies from around the world are discussed.

ANTH 285   Intro to Korea Through Film   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as EALC 285. See EALC 285.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Non-West

ANTH 286   Southeast Asian Civilizations   credit: 3 Hours.

Overviews the cultural and institutional history of the Indianized states and Vietnam, with attention to dominant commercial, political, religious, artistic, and social traditions of Southeast Asia. Same as ASST 286 and HIST 225.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Hist & Phil
Cultural Studies - Non-West

ANTH 288   American Indians of Illinois   credit: 3 Hours.

An interdisciplinary survey of the Native American experience in the Illinois region from pre-Columbian times to the present. Introduces theories, concepts and methods in archaeology, history, and sociocultural anthropology. Includes archaeological field site and museum visits, plus guest lectures by American Indian scholars and community members. Same as AIS 288 and HIST 288.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Hist & Phil
Cultural Studies - US Minority

ANTH 290   Jewish Cultures of the World   credit: 3 Hours.

Survey of the world's Jewish cultures with a particular focus on the non-Western world. Addresses the relations between Judaism and other religious systems and the nature of Jewish life in such locales as North Africa, Subsaharan Africa, India, China, and South America.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Non-West

ANTH 340   Archaeology of Religion   credit: 3 Hours.

We familiarize ourselves with how anthropologists approach the study of religion and then look at how we can best understand religion in the past. We examine the differences between religion, worldview, cosmology and culture, and investigate what archaeology can tell us about the origins of religion and the materiality and mundane practices of religion, revitalization and missionization. Lectures will cover theoretical, perspectives, and archaeological cases. Same as REL 342. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

ANTH 343   Behavior and Biology of Women   credit: 3 Hours.

Exploration of female biology and behavior in a broad evolutionary context. Explores development from pre-puberty through menopause, reproductive processes such as pregnancy, birth and lactation, cognitive and behavioral sex differences, and male and female reproductive strategies in a variety of cultural settings. Examples are drawn primarily from traditional and modern human societies as well as field and experimental data from other species, particularly non-human primates. Prerequisite: ANTH 143 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 346   Forensic Anthropology   credit: 3 Hours.

Analysis of human skeletal remains of the medico-legal profession. Topics include the development of the field of forensic anthropology, biological profile and skeletal trauma analysis, interval since death estimation. Additional topics include investigation of crime scenes, the legal role of the biological anthropologist as an expert witness and case report preparation. Attention will also be drawn to the incorporation of anthropological and ethical approaches to dealing with death and using human remains for research. Prerequisite: ANTH 240 and ANTH 246.

ANTH 347   Human Osteology   credit: 3 Hours.

Comprehensive knowledge of the human skeleton is central to reconstructing the anatomy, demography, health and evolution of past populations because most of our evidence is derived from preserved skeletal and dental remains. The primary goal of this course is the identification of isolated and fragmentary skeletal remains given that this is a prerequisite to all subsequent analysis. In addition to identifying the bones and landmarks of the human skeleton, students will learn about the structure and function of bone, understand the growth and development of the human skeleton and be introduced to analytical techniques used in human osteology including paleopathology, paleodemography and forensics. Prerequisite: ANTH 240.

ANTH 358   People of the Ice Age   credit: 3 Hours.

Explores a vast period of human prehistory - 2 million to 10,000 years ago - before the first cities arose and before people domesticated plants and animals in the Old World; uses archaeological and paleoanthropological data to understand past life ways as well as reasons for change through time in human adaptation. Prerequisite: ANTH 102.

ANTH 362   Body, Personhood, and Culture   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines basic cultural assumptions about the human body and what it means to be a "person" in Western and non-Western societies. Addresses key themes in cultural anthropology and the social sciences concerning the relationship of the individual and society and of nature and culture.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

ANTH 363   Anth of Dance/Movement   credit: 3 Hours.

Anthropological study of dance and other human movement systems in cultural contexts. Designed especially for students with little or no background in socio-cultural anthropology or the social sciences. Includes reading the works of major figures in the field, and learning how to study dances, signed languages and ritual events from an anthropological perspective. Students will also learn about socio-cultural theory and observation, doing fieldwork, movement literacy, problems of subjectivity and objectivity, and personal anthropology.

ANTH 364   Performing "America   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to theories of performance and performativity or enactment, and applies these to an understanding of public events like political rallies, music, the arts, protests, and everyday life in the U.S. Emphasis on how these practices of production and consumption help articulate social identity, including gendered, sexual, racial/ethnic, religious, class, and generational affiliations. Focus on the contemporary U.S. with comparative case studies drawn from other parts of the world and some historical materials. Draws on anthropological studies, as well as scholarly literatures from communication studies, literature, the arts, and social history. Prerequisite: At least one course in anthropology or the social sciences.

ANTH 368   'America' in the World   credit: 3 Hours.

Study of the lure and rejection of the U.S. around the world, by drawing on long-standing anthropological approaches to the histories of peoplehood, selfhood, and otherness. Examines the historical, political, cultural, economic, and social context of both anti- and pro-Americanism, in various parts of the globe. Prerequisite: Any previous course in cultural anthropology.

ANTH 372   Topics in Lang & Culture   credit: 3 Hours.

Advanced topics in language and culture. May be repeated in separate terms. Prerequisite: ANTH 104, ANTH 270, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 374   Anth of Science and Technology   credit: 3 Hours.

Examination of science as a cultural system. Utilizing ethnographic methods and social theories, the course will locate scientific knowledge, institutions and practices within enduring anthropological questions around rationality and truth, meaning, personhood, sociality, power inequalities, social transformations, and social justice. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

ANTH 375   The Culture of Nature   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines how the natural and the cultural are mutually-constitutive concepts, and investigates contemporary and historical constructions of notions of a natural world. We will see how these concepts have varied over time and among different social groups, with a special emphasis on the contemporary United States. Topics will include the idea of landscape and of nature as a resource to be used, appreciated, represented, controlled, or enjoyed. In addition, the course will feature a special unit on sustainability, and one devoted to analyzing our relationships to animals. Prerequisite: At least one anthropology course or a course in another social science.

ANTH 376   Aztec Civilization   credit: 3 Hours.

Detailed description and analysis of Aztec culture, society, and empire at c. 1500 AD, based primarily on ethnohistorical documentation. Topics covered include life cycle, family and society, political and economic organization, warfare, religion, and intellectual and aesthetic traditions. External relationships with neighboring peoples and the indigenous view of the Spanish conquest are considered. Prerequisite: ANTH 102, ANTH 103, or ANTH 105.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Non-West

ANTH 379   Medical Anthropology   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to concepts and social aspects of health, illness, and curing in different cultures. Considers concepts of interaction between folk and modern medicine in developing nations and delivery of health care as an international social problem. Prerequisite: ANTH 230 or ANTH 260, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 380   Ethnography of the University   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduces students to ethnographic research methods through research on the University of Illinois. Emphasizes qualitative research methods and institutional analysis. Student work builds on research done by prior students and student research is web archived. Reflection on and reconfiguration of research questions and hypotheses is encouraged as research projects proceed. Prerequisite: Any 100-level or 200-level sociocultural anthropology course: ANTH 103, ANTH 104, ANTH 230 etc.

ANTH 390   Individual Study   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

Supervised reading and research on anthropological topics chosen by the student with staff approval. Especially (but not exclusively) for students who are preparing for a summer field-work project, or who have some justifiable reason for doing independent study, but who do not qualify for the honors (departmental distinction) courses. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing; 12 hours in anthropology; consent of instructor. May not be taken concurrently with ANTH 391 or ANTH 495.

ANTH 393   The World of Jewish Sepharad   credit: 3 Hours.

Study of the cultural legacy and history of the Sephardic Jews, mostly focusing on the Mediterranean and the thriving communities they established in countries of Muslim governance and in the Balkans, and more recently in America. The Judeo-Spanish language, which has been preserved until the end of the twentieth century, the press, literature and music are components of this course. Same as HIST 393 and REL 393. This course can be used to fulfill either Western or non-Western general education categories, but not both.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Hist & Phil
Cultural Studies - Non-West
Cultural Studies - Western

ANTH 399   Special Topics   credit: 1 to 3 Hours.

Topics are given on a one-time only, experimental basis. Faculty offer special topics in their areas of expertise that provide an opportunity for undergraduates to be exposed to some of the most current developments in faculty research. May be repeated.

ANTH 402   Transnational Islam, Europe-US   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Anthropological approach to transnational Islam, focusing on its various expressions in Europe and the United States, particularly since World War II. Same as ASST 402 and REL 409. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 230 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 405   Contemporary Central America   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Explores cultural, political and historical processes in 20th- and 21st-century Central America--focusing on Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala--through an anthropological lens. Grapples with a core set of questions arising from changes in the global relations, including the rise of global neoliberalism, the crises and renovations of political projects, the transformations of spatial relations through transnational migration, and the proliferation of various pan-hemispheric as well as local identity-based movements. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 103 or ANTH 182 or ANTH 230 or a course in Latin American history or consent of instructor.

ANTH 408   Human Evolutionary Anatomy   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Comprehensive, comparative study of musculoskeletal anatomy in primates, focusing on functional and adaptive changes that have occurred in the masticatory apparatus, facial skeleton, and locomotor systems of New World monkeys, Old World monkeys, apes, and humans. Relationships between morphology, ecology, and behavior are discussed, applied to the fossil record, and used to address current issues in human evolution. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 443 or ANTH 440 or ANTH 456 or a course in human or comparative vertebrate anatomy.

ANTH 409   Human Evolutionary Anatomy Lab   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Comparative detailed dissections of craniofacial, locomotor, neural, and alimentary systems in nonhuman primates, to understand the anatomical bases of human evolution. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent registration in ANTH 408.

ANTH 411   Research Methods in Socio-Cultural Anthropology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Exploration of qualitative forms of research used by sociocultural anthropologists when conducting field research. Emphasis is on formulating research questions, research design, and application of these ethnographic methods to a substantial research project. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

ANTH 414   Writing Ethnography   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Addresses issues of the theoretical divide between the humanities and the social sciences, the unique authority of the scholar/author, and the invisibility of the reader in producing scholarly texts. Focusing on the ways in which scholars are also authors, we explore current debates by reading a selection of contemporary anthropological texts (and some prescient precursors) that boldly experiment with how ethnography is written. Students will experiment with several ethnographic writing styles. This course is designed for advanced undergraduate anthropology students and graduate students in cultural anthropology, writing studies, and education. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Undergraduate students should have already taken at least one 300-level course in cultural anthropology, and graduate students in cultural anthropology, writing studies, and education. Other students should contact the instructor.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Advanced Composition

ANTH 420   Case Studies Global Heritage   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Cultural heritage encompasses major domains of social, economic, political, religious and environmental practice and policy-making under today's conditions of globalization. Students will critically examine cultural heritage case studies from around the world. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

ANTH 421   Social Organization   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Introduction to anthropological concepts of social organization and structure; considers kinship theory, descent and alliance systems, social stratification, nonkin association, social networks, group identification and boundaries, structural-functional interpretations of society, and the meaning of social or cultural structure. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 230 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 423   Economic Anthropology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Covers the emergence of economic anthropology as a subdiscipline; considers various definitions of economics with their implications for the study of human society; emphasizes the relationship between social organization and economic life from the perspectives of classical studies in anthropology and their contemporary interpretations. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 230.

ANTH 430   The History of Anthropology   credit: 4 Hours.

Provides a selective overview of the history and historiography of anthropology in the 19th and 20th centuries. The class moves chronologically and topically, paying particular attention to the social, institutional, and historical contexts of paradigmatic shifts, the interconnections between various national traditions, and the negotiations of the discipline's boundaries. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Graduate or senior standing in anthropology, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 435   The Neandertal Debate   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

A detailed investigation of the origin and biological adaptations of late archaic humans and the emergence of modern humans. Explores the practice and validity to using skeletal anatomy to interpret the behavior of past populations using evolutionary and comparative approaches. This course will interpret Neandertal biology and anatomy with particular emphasis on its relevance for theories about the origin and evolution of our species. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 240.

ANTH 437   Primate Behav Endocrinology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Introduction to behavioral endocrinology, focusing on primate, especially human behaviors. Examines the relationship between hormones and behavior using an evolutionary and comparative approach, considering both how hormones influences behavior and how behavioral interactions regulate endocrine physiology. The course covers basic endocrine system physiology and function, hormonal influences on primate social behaviors such as male and female reproductive behaviors, courtship, parental care, bonding and attachment, as well as aggression and territoriality. Other topics include stress, hormones, and health. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: IB 150 and ANTH 143; or an equivalent course in behavioral ecology, primate behavior, physiology or psychology; or consent of instructor.

ANTH 438   Primate Life History Evolution   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Life history seeks to explain why differences exist in the pathways that organisms follow from conception to death. Examination of the diversity in the evolution of primate (including human) life histories. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 102, ANTH 143, ANTH 240, ANTH 243 or equivalent.

ANTH 440   Human Paleontology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Principles of evolution and a survey of human evolution from the early primates through the Pleistocene epoch; emphasis on evolutionary theory as applied to humans and interpretation of the fossil record. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 240 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 441   Human Genetics   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Principles of human genetics; anthropological aspects of race and race formation; and hereditary and environmental factors in the biological variation of modern humans. Same as ANSC 441. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or equivalent.

ANTH 443   Primate Form and Behavior   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Survey of primate social behavior and the classification, morphology, and distribution of living and extinct species; emphasis on interrelationships among behavior, biology, and ecology. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 240 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 444   Methods in Bioanthropology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Supervised participation in biological anthropology research projects; techniques, methods, and procedures discussed and practiced under actual field or laboratory working conditions. Normally taken concurrently with ANTH 445. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Usually offered in the summer session only. Prerequisite: ANTH 240 or equivalent; consent of instructor.

ANTH 445   Research in Bioanthropology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Analysis, interpretation, evaluation, and organization of field and laboratory data in biological anthropology; preparation of written reports on research. May be taken concurrently with ANTH 444 or subsequently. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Usually offered in the summer session only. Prerequisite: ANTH 240 or equivalent; consent of instructor.

ANTH 446   Behavioral Inference & Fossils   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Theories and methods for interpreting behaviors inferred from the human and primate fossil record. Topics include discussions of adaptation, methods of inference in historical sciences, and practical experimental approaches to understanding aspects of diet, locomotor behavior and social organization in species known only from the fossil record. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 240.

ANTH 447   Advanced Skeletal Biology   credit: 3 Hours.

Human skeletal and dental remains form the basis for research in both bioarchaeology and forensic anthropology. We will examine the bases for making inferences about individual skeletons and past populations, with particular emphasis placed on paleodemography, reconstruction of diet, paleopathology, and biological distance analysis. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 347.

ANTH 448   The Prehistory of Africa   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

The study of cultural development in Africa from the appearance of hominids to the time of European domination. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 220 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 449   North American Archeology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Methods, techniques, and results of archaeology in North America; focuses on divergent approaches to the regional archaeology of North America; and surveys and synthesizes the archaeology of the subcontinent. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 220 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 451   Archaeological Surveying   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Familiarization with methods used in the location and recording of archaeological sites, including techniques of mapping especially adapted to the needs of archaeology; attention given to means of presenting results and interpreting data derived from this work; and work both in the field and in the laboratory. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 220 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 452   Stone Tool Technology Analysis   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Lecture and laboratory on the principles and techniques of stone and bone artifact manufacture, identification, classification, metrical analysis, interpretation, and integration with other classes of archaeological evidence. Emphasis on the use of lithics to test human behavioral models. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 220.

ANTH 453   Landscape Archaeology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

The use of archaeological, documentary, and oral history evidence to study and interpret the ways past peoples shaped their landscapes through the deployment of cultural and social practices, and the ways, in turn, that such people were influenced, motivated, or constrained by their natural surroundings. Same as LA 454. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Introductory archaeology course, such as ANTH 220, or introductory landscape architecture course, such as LA 215, and a 300 level course in socio-cultural anthropology or archaeology, or equivalent with instructor's permission.

ANTH 454   Archaeological Field School   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Participation in archaeological excavations; techniques, methods, and procedures discussed and practiced under actual working conditions. Normally taken concurrently with ANTH 455. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Usually offered in the summer session only. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ANTH 455   Lab Analysis in Archaeology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Laboratory work including processing, classifying, dating, interpretation, evaluation, and preparation of written reports of archaeological research. May be taken concurrently with ANTH 454 or subsequently. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 459   The Ancient Maya   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to the Ancient Maya of Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras. Evaluates theories that account for the rise and fall of Classic (c. A.D. 250-950) Maya rulership. Excavation data, inconography, and inscriptions are used to reconstruct political and social organization, ideology, subsistence activities, and inter-regional interactions. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 105.

ANTH 460   Heritage Management   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Detailed examination of the theoretical and practical issues of archaeological heritage management. Focusing on the legal, environmental, ethical, social, political, educational, and touristic aspects of the management of ancient sites for their continued sustainability. Same as LA 460 and RST 459. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 220 and at least one ANTH 300- or 400-level archaeological area course.

ANTH 461   Hist of Archaeological Theory   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examines the prominent theories in archaeology from its inception to the present day and does so within the context of general developments in anthropological thought. Provides a foundation for graduate students and a capstone for major emphasizing archaeology. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: For undergraduates: ANTH 220; anthropology major with focus on archaeology; senior standing or consent of the instructor. For graduate students: enrollment in ANTH 430 during the same term advised.

ANTH 462   Museum Theory and Practice   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

A foundational introduction to museology consisting of a critical examination of the history and social life of museums and how museums have been studied by scholars in a range of academic disciplines. Includes visits to campus and local museums. Same as ARTH 462 and LA 472. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

ANTH 463   Religion and Society   credit: 4 Hours.

Course focuses on theoretical issues raised by religion. Does religion address itself essentially to intellectual, emotional or pragmatic issues? Is religion created by rulers, clerics or worshippers? How does the individual experience religion, and (how) can s/he reshape it? In exploring these and related issues, we will read the writings of German, French, and British social scientists of the past 150 years as well as work by contemporary anthropologists. Theoretical perspectives covered include symbolic, processual, materialist, structural-functionalist, structuralist, and postmodernist approaches. Same as REL 463. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: A 200-level course in cultural anthropology or consent of instructor; or graduate standing.

ANTH 465   Oceania's Peoples and Cultures   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Survey of the Pacific Islands; regional geography, human ecology, culture history, and ethnography of Melanesia, New Guinea, Polynesia, New Zealand, Micronesia, and Australia; and some consideration of Pacific ethnohistory and the role of Oceania in the modern world. Same as ASST 465. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 and ANTH 103, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 466   Class, Culture and Society   credit: 4 Hours.

Social hierarchies in a variety of cultural contexts; industrial societies and the process of industrialization; looks at other social forms for the purposes of comparison. A variety of social theories will be discussed and compared through ethnographic studies. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 103 and ANTH 230 or graduate standing.

ANTH 467   Cultures of Africa   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Culture and social organization in traditional African societies with emphasis on the politics, kinship, and religion of a small sample of societies illustrating the main cultural variations found in sub-Saharan Africa; some discussion of ecological factors and ethnic group relations in precolonial times. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 230 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 468   Religions of Africa   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Explores a variety of religious traditions and experiences in sub-Saharan Africa from an anthropological perspective. Local, indigenous traditions are emphasized, but African experiences of Islam and Christianity are also covered. Same as AFST 468 and REL 468. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: A 200-level course in cultural anthropology or consent of instructor; or graduate standing.

ANTH 469   Kinship-Culture-Power-Africa   credit: 2 or 4 Hours.

To present the classic approaches to kinship in anthropology that were developed for Africa; to explore the variety of kinship arrangements and strategies that exist in Africa; and to expose students to the panoply of contemporary critiques of classic works on kinship in Africa, and contemporary alternatives to them. Same as AFST 467. 2 or 4 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: For students outside anthropology or African Studies, at least one previous course in cultural anthropology is strongly recommended.

ANTH 471   Ethnography through Language   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Overview of theoretical perspectives and methodologies in linguistic anthropology, including sociolinguistics, ethnography of communication, performance and poetics, discursive practices, and structural analyses. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 230 or ANTH 270 and preferably both.

ANTH 472   Border Latina, Latino Cultures   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Explores and examines the production of U. S. Latina/Latino identities as instances of international, cultural, historical, and social border crossings. In both regional and global contexts, we will analyze the ways in which Mexican American, Cuban American and Puerto Rican identities have been shaped by colonial relations vis-a-vis Spain and by postcolonial conditions vis-a-vis the United States. Same as LLS 472. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 103, and ANTH 259 or ANTH 359.

ANTH 473   Museums and Communities   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examination of museums and members of ethnographic source communities, and the development of new curatorial practices that incorporate source community needs and views. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

ANTH 477   Pottery Analysis   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Introduction to the theories and techniques of pottery analysis for archaeologists. In addition to presentation and discussion of the major literature, there is hands-on practice making, drawing, breaking and analyzing pottery. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 220 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 478   African Immigrants in Europe   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examines the pressing issues facing the new European Union as the realities of multicultural continent shape the daily lives of all. Begins with EU policy and theoretical models of immigration, but most readings emphasize perspectives of Africans' own experiences as immigrants and refugees in Europe. Same as AFST 478 and EURO 478. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: One prior 300-level anthropology or related social science course, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 481   Andean Ethnography   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Survey of Andean cultures at the time of the Spanish conquest, of their subsequent history, and of modern Indian culture in the Andean countries. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 182, ANTH 230 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 486   Peoples of Mainland SE Asia   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Culture, cultural history, and social systems of mainland Southeast Asia: Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos, Assam Hills, upland southwestern China, and Malaya; emphasis on the interaction of complementary ethnic types in the context of local ecology and the Hindu-Buddhist systems of religion and politics of the lowland states. Same as ASST 486. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 220 or ANTH 230, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 488   Modern Europe   credit: 4 Hours.

Historical studies which deploy anthropological methods in the study of early modern and modern Europe; looks at processes of twentieth century modernization through ethnographic studies. Western, Central and Eastern Europe will all receive attention, but the study of Western Europe will predominate. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 103 and ANTH 230 or three history courses or graduate standing.

ANTH 494   Honors Senior Thesis I   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

The first of a two-term individual study and research project for those students who are candidates for departmental distinction in anthropology. 2 to 4 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Prerequisite: Senior standing; 3.25 GPA in anthropology; and consent of instructor. May not be taken concurrently with ANTH 390.

ANTH 495   Honors Senior Thesis II   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

The second of a two-term individual study and research project for those students who are candidates for departmental distinction in anthropology. 2 to 4 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Prerequisite: Senior standing; 3.25 GPA in anthropology; and consent of instructor. May not be taken concurrently with ANTH 390.

ANTH 496   Individual Field Research   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Supervised participation in field research in ethnography, ethnology, linguistics, or social anthropology; techniques, methods, and procedures discussed and practiced under actual working conditions. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Usually offered in the summer session only. Prerequisite: ANTH 230; some knowledge of the language of the area concerned; consent of instructor. Normally taken concurrently with ANTH 497.

ANTH 497   Individual Field Data Analysis   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Analysis, interpretation, evaluation, and organization of field data in cultural anthropology; preparation of written reports on research in ethnography, ethnology, linguistics, or social anthropology. May be taken concurrently with ANTH 496 or subsequently. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Prerequisite: ANTH 230; some knowledge of the language of the area concerned; consent of instructor.

ANTH 498   Senior Capstone Seminar   credit: 3 Hours.

A guided independent research seminar for Anthropology majors normally taken during the Fall of the senior year. Students may select to conduct significant and original research in any of the four sub-fields of anthropology or combine interdisciplinary interests. Working closely with the course instructors and with additional guidance from a chosen anthropology faculty advisor, student will develop a research topic of their choice, identify significant research questions, before collecting and analyzing their field data. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit.

ANTH 499   Topics in Anthropology   credit: 4 Hours.

Research seminar on specialized topics in anthropology. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MUSE Class Schedule

Museum Studies Courses

MUSE 200   Introduction to Museums   credit: 3 Hours.

A broad introduction to the museum world, focusing on what a museum is, what differentiates various types of museums, and how museums function. Examines museums in terms of education, curation, exhibition, public relations, research, administration, ethical and legal obligations, funding and knowledge. Prerequisite: One year of college coursework.

MUSE 250   The World Through Museums   credit: 3 Hours.

Examination of contemporary museums around the world, evaluating their roles as social institutions and communicators of heritage in increasingly global contexts. The first half of the course develops a framework for museum literacy (how to read museums) that incorporates anthropological, globalization, media and critical theories. The second half of the course is a virtual tour and evaluates museums using this analytical skill set. Same as ANTH 250.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci
Cultural Studies - Western

MUSE 330   Learning in Museums   credit: 3 Hours.

An applied course in the multiple responsibilities of professionals in the field of Museum Education. Examines how people, ideas and objects connect in museums; trends in interpretation and museum ethics; best practice and current learning theories; and exemplary programs involving highly varied audiences, community collaboration and advanced technology. Provides practical experience in program development, facilitation, documentation and assessment. Requires some in-museum work outside of regularly scheduled class hours. Includes field trips to local museums. Prerequisite: MUSE 200.

MUSE 389   Seminar in Museum Studies   credit: 3 Hours.

Study of special themes, selected topics or current issues in museum studies for undergraduate students with backgrounds in museology. Course may be in seminar or lecture format. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: MUSE 200 and ANTH 462.

MUSE 390   Museum Internship   credit: 3 Hours.

Supervised field experience in museums, both on and off-campus, designed to introduce students to professional practice. Builds on museum studies coursework, and provides opportunities for applying academic knowledge and analyzing personal development. Students work part-time (150 hours) in a program-approved museum under the guidance of an instructional team. Requires an internship contract before the term, regular reporting and documentation during the term, and compilation of a project portfolio at the end of the term. May be repeated in same and separate terms to a maximum of six hours. Prerequisite: Three courses (nine hours) within the undergraduate minor in Museum Studies. Requires approval of the Museum Studies program advisor.

MUSE 420   Collections Management   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

An applied course in the preservation, documentation, and maintenance of the physical integrity of museum collections. Examines agents of deterioration and how to mitigate damage to collections; the chemical and physical properties of inorganic, organic, composite and textile materials; collections packing, shipping and storage methods; and collections hazards, safety and emergency planning. Provides practical experience and encourages skills development in collections management. Requires some in-museum work outside of regularly scheduled class hours. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MUSE 200 or MUSE 500.

MUSE 440   Museum Registration   credit: 3 Hours.

An applied course in the management and care of museum collections through registration and records. Examines legal and ethical issues of collections stewardship, and current professional practices and standards. Provides practical experience and encourages skills development in museum registration. Requires some in-museum work outside of regularly scheduled class hours. Includes a field trip to a local museum. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MUSE 200 or MUSE 500.