Learning and Education Studies

http://education.illinois.edu/

Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs: Kathy Ryan
Admissions Information:  saao@education.illinois.edu

142 Education Building, 1310 South Sixth, Champaign, (217) 333-2800

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Learning and Education Studies

This curriculum prepares individuals for positions requiring expertise in formal and non-formal learning and educational settings that do NOT require licensure (becoming a licensed teacher).  Students interested in becoming a licensed teacher should consider the licensure program in the majors of Elementary Education, Early Childhood Education, Special Education, or Middle Grades. 

A minimum of 120 semester hours is necessary for graduation in the Learning and Education Studies program.  Students will spend much of the first two years with general education courses, achieving a solid preparation in the humanities, social and natural sciences, technology and mathematics.  In the final two years of the major, students will take a set of core courses, as well as coursework in one of the following concentrations:  1) Applied Learning Science; 2) Educational Equality and Cultural Understanding; 3) Workplace Training and Development; or 4) Digital Environments for Learning, Teaching and Agency.

Degree Requirements

Orientation Seminar
EDUC 101Education Orientation Seminar1

The following degree requirements also meet general education course requirements and must be selected from the campus general education course list.  Selections of core requirements courses should be made in consultation with the adviser.

Composition 1
Composition I4-6
Advanced Composition3-4
Quantitative Reasoning 1
EPSY 280Elements of Statistics (or another approved basic course in statistical methods such as STAT 100, SOC 280, or PSYC 235) 23-4
From approved campus list3
Natural Sciences and Technology 1
From approved campus list 6
Humanities and the Arts 1
From approved campus list6
Social and Behavioral Sciencess 1
From approved campus list (must include PSYC 100)6
Cultural Studies 1
From Western Culture(s) approved campus list3
From U.S. Minority Culture(s) or Non-Western Culture(s) approved campus list3
Language other than English
Three years of one language other than English in high school or competion of the third semester of college-level language0-12
Core Requirements 3
Choose 2 from the following:6-7
The Culture of Disability
Foundations of Education
Foundations of Education-ACP
Child Dev in Education
Choose 6 from the following, with at least 2 in each area:18-20
Teaching and Learning:
Serving Child in Schools/Comm
Lang Varieties,Cult,& Learning
Child Language and Education
Prof Issues for Teachers
Educational Psychology
Psyc of Learning in Education
Leadership in a Diverse Global Economy:
Race and Cultural Diversity
Asian American Education 4
Historical & Social Barriers
Diversity in the Workplace
Concentration 3
Students must complete 24 credit hours within one of the following areas of concentration: 1) Applied Learning Science, 2) Educational Equality and Cultural Understanding, 3) Workplace Training and Development, or 4) Digital Environments for Learning, Teaching and Agency.24
Electives
Electives (including minor, if taken)16-34
Total Hours120

Total minimum hours include general education, language other than English, concentration and core credits.

1

General Education Requirement. Courses must be selected from the Campus General Education Approved Course List.

2

EPSY 280 is recommended for the AppLeS concentration.

3

Concentration and Core Requirement courses found on the General Education Approved Course List may also be credited toward the General Education requirements.

4

Course can be counted in the Core requirement or the Concentration requirement but not both.

Applied Learning Science (AppLeS) Concentration

The undergraduate non-licensure concentration in Applied Learning Science (AppLeS) will provide a thorough grounding in the learning sciences through an innovative program that includes courses in learning, language understanding, quantitative reasoning and statistics, designing learning environments, and human performance.  The program culminates in a capstone course in which the student works on a research project under the direction of one or more faculty members.  Graduating students will have a solid preparation for graduate study in this emerging area of scholarship (such as the new Learning Science and Engineering Professional MS Program at Carnegie-Mellon University), as well as in education, psychology, business, law, and other more traditional areas of study.  In addition, through their coursework and research experience, international and domestic students will be prepared for a wide range of current (and future) jobs that require expertise in design, analysis, and evaluation of learning environments, as teachers, policy makers, analysts, and professionals in government, healthcare, business, and nonprofit organizations. 

Students in the AppLeS concentration will:

  • Explore theories, phenomena, and methods in the learning sciences (i.e., the biological, cognitive, dispositional, and sociocultural underpinnings of learning).
  • Identify general principles of learning, their contextual variations, and how they can be applied in the classroom, at work and home, and diverse settings of daily life. 
  • Acquire flexible learning and problem solving skills that can be broadly applied in diverse contexts, including research, quantitative reasoning, communication, and collaborative problem solving.

Students are encouraged to pursue a minor or a coherent set of electives from several departments as approved by their adviser.  Suggested minors are:  Communication, Computer Science, Informatics, Linguistics, Mathematics or Statistics.

The following courses are required for this concentration. Changes/additions to this list can be obtained from the College office. Approvals for substitution must be submitted by petition to the College office for approval by the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs.

EPSY 403Res Methods in Learning Scienc3
EPSY 398Thesis (Capstone Research Project)3
Choose 2 from the following:6
Learning from Text
Developments in Educ Psyc (Learning in Everyday Contexts section)
Intro Cognitive Science
Choose 1 from the following:3
Adult Learning and Development
Cognitive Dev in Educ Context
Choose 1 from the following:3
Sociocultural Infl on Learning
Adjustment in School Settings
Issues and Developments in HRD
Choose 1 from the following:3
Learning & Hum Dev w/ EdTech
Learning Technologies
Human Performance and Cognition in Context
Choose 1 from the following:3
Principles of Measurement
Intermediate Social Statistics
Total Hours24

Educational Equality and Cultural Understanding Concentration

This undergraduate non-licensure concentration will prepare students to better understand the role of education in enabling equality and cultural understanding in domestic and international perspectives.  Focusing on equality, diversity, and cultural understanding will give students a unique perspective on the historical place of education in both challenging inequities and helping to justify social divisions.  Understanding how education as an institution operates to perpetuate social and economic stratification will give students a perspective on the challenges of creating a more equitable distribution of education.  Classes will cover a wide range of disciplinary approaches, including history, social science, educational policy analysis, and theory.  Students will understand the contemporary and historical barriers to the distribution of education and examine recent human rights-based demands for extending education to people of all social classes, regions, ethnicity, language groups, and genders.

Knowing how equity, social justice, and cultural understanding are enabled through education requires an in-depth understanding of domestic and international contexts.  Introductory courses will cover basic definitions of educational justice and educational equality, survey international minorities in the United States or minorities in other countries in relationship to education, and explore political, economic, and social contexts for education. 

Intermediary classes will invite students to apply their basic understanding of such processes to more local and detailed contexts, like shifts in the U.S. that have extended public schooling and higher education opportunities to historically marginalized populations such as people of color, immigrants, women and citizens from low socioeconomic status.  Advanced classes will introduce students to the theoretical approaches to studying social justice and difference, including Critical Race Theory, transnational and global theory, and globalized critical pedagogy.

These courses will be designed to appeal to international and domestic students seeking employment in both the United States and international educational settings, including teaching English as a second language.  In addition, understanding the role of education in fostering the expansion of universal human rights will enable students interested in international business and NGOs to explore the problems and potentials of policies intent on improving conditions in the United States and abroad.  As all areas of study and trade are increasingly situated in transnational networks, the concentration in Educational Equality and Cultural Understanding provides a firm grounding on key issues of rights, obligations, and new institutions that help maintain commitments for educational equity and justice under these new circumstances.

Students are encouraged to pursue a minor or a coherent set of electives from several departments as approved by their adviser.  Suggested minors are:  English as a Second Language, African-American Studies, Asian American Studies, Global Studies, Latina/Latino Studies, South Asian Studies, Gender and Women's Studies, or LGBT/Queer Studies.

The following courses are required for this concentration. Changes/additions to this list can be obtained from the College office. Approvals for substitution must be submitted by petition to the College office for approval by the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs.

Choose 3 from the following:9
Education and Social Justice
History of American Education
Historical & Social Barriers
School and Society
Choose 2 from the following Cultural Understanding area:6
Asian American Education 1
Race, Ed Pol, and Soc Science
Comparative Education
Choose 2 from the following Educational Equality area:6
Critical Thinking for Teachers
Sociology of Education
Politics of Education
Elective class from GWS, LLS, AAS, AFRO, AIS, or GLBL3
Total Hours24
1

Course can be counted in the Core requirement or the Concentration requirement but not both.

Workplace Training and Development Concentration

Workplace Training and Development is a non-licensure undergraduate concentration.  The concentration will provide international and domestic students with the broad sets of knowledge and skills necessary to develop, deliver, and evaluate training and development programs across workplace settings, such as businesses and industries, two-year post-secondary schools, or community and government agencies.  In addition, it will serve a growing demand for graduates who have an interest in helping adults learn about and seek to improve organizational performance.  The demand comes from a range of business sectors, specifically health care, manufacturing, and logistics.

Students in this concentration will receive an overview of the human resource development field and specifically focus on the training and development aspects of the field.  Students will acquire the knowledge and practical skills, in such areas as job and task analysis, training program design, and training program coordination.  Students will also be introduced to learning management systems, which most organizations now use to track the learning progress of their employees. 

An internship is recommended during the program, but it is not required. For internship credit, students can register in HRD 491 Professional Skill Development before the internship starts. At the end of the internship, a letter from the internship supervisor is submitted to the Workplace Training and Development departmental contact.

The concentration appeals to the following potential students:

  • Individuals who wish to combine the study of organizations and learning in their academic studies;
  • Individuals who currently work in a technical role, such as a lab tech or nurse in health care, and who want to become more involved in training others about their occupation;
  • Individuals with an associates degree who work as information technology specialists and who are asked to develop and deliver training for others;
  • Individuals who wish to work in the business and industry outreach departments of community colleges;
  • Individuals who serve or wish to serve as instructors in post-secondary technical education schools;
  • Individuals who wish to serve as a staff member in the human resource development department of an organization; and
  • Individuals who wish to prepare for future graduate study in human resource development.

Students are encouraged to pursue a minor or a coherent set of electives from several departments as approved by their adviser.  Suggested minors are: Business, Leadership, Communication, Technology and Management or Global Labor Studies.

The following courses are required for this concentration. Changes/additions to this list can be obtained from the College office. Approvals for substitution must be submitted by petition to the College office for approval by the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs.

HRD 401Training in Business/Industry3
HRD 402Business Principles for HRD3
HRD 411Training System Design3
HRD 412Instructional Techniques3
HRD 414Facilitation Skills3
HRD 415Diversity in the Workplace3
HRD 440Work Analysis3
HRD 472Learning Technologies3
Total Hours24

Digital Environments for Learning, Teaching and Agency (DELTA) Concentration

The undergraduate non-licensure concentration in Digital Environments for Learning, Teaching, and Agency (DELTA) will provide students with a strong background in the design, development and implementation of technology for a range of learning environments. Courses will introduce students to learning theory, designing and using technology to support learning, and issues encountered when deploying technology to schools, workplaces and informal learning spaces. The program culminates in a capstone course in which students work on a design project under the direction of one or more faculty members.

Graduating students will be prepared to engage with various stakeholders interested in using technology to support learning in a range of different contexts. Examples include selecting and deploying appropriate technology to support pedagogic goals for schools, corporations, or informal learning environments such as museums and afterschool clubs, designing educational games or toys and educational application development. One of the main objectives for students in DELTA is to build new ways to support learning, and prepare them for leadership roles in formal and informal environments, technology design and implementation strategies. They will also be prepared to pursue graduate study in a range of programs, such as educational technology, learning sciences, or instructional technology at the University of Illinois or elsewhere.

Students are encouraged to pursue a relevant minor or coherent set of electives from several related departments. Suggested minors include: computer science, communication, psychology, informatics, media and cinema studies or sociology. Students may also consider a minor in a specific content area from the arts and sciences to develop expertise in a particular field.

The DELTA concentration consists of 24 hours of course work. Students are required to take a minimum of two foundations courses, three core courses and three elective courses. The core courses are designed to ensure students leave the program with foundational knowledge and skills necessary to design, develop, implement, manage, and evaluate digital environments. The elective courses allow students to tailor the concentration to fit individual career goals and areas of interest. Students should take the foundation course Introduction to Digital Environments in the first semester they join DELTA. Similarly, the Capstone Research Project should be taken in the last semester after the majority of DELTA-related course work is complete.

The following courses are required for this concentration. Changes/additions to this list can be obtained from the College office. Approvals for substitution must be submitted by petition to the College office for approval by the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs.

CI 210Introduction to Digital Learning Environments3
CI 489DELTA Capstone Project3
Choose 1 from the following:3
Learning & Hum Dev w/ EdTech
Developments in Educ Psyc (Learning in Everyday Contexts section)
Intro Cognitive Science
Choose 1 from the following:3
Sociocultural Infl on Learning
Social Learning and Multimedia
Choose 1 from the following:3
Education and Social Justice
Technology & Educational Reform
Introduction to Educational Technology
Choose 3 from the following:9
Educational Game Design
Comp Prgrmmg and the Classroom
Child Development & Technology
New Learning
Learning & Hum Dev w/ EdTech
Learning Technologies
Innovation in E-Learning
Total Hours24