Translation Studies (TRST)

TRST Class Schedule

Courses

TRST 201   Intro to Translation Studies   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to translation as an academic discipline and professional field through a series of texts in translation. Explores the ways in which texts, images, and ideas move across cultures, across time, across languages, and through different art forms; to elevate the students' appreciation of literature and other art forms; and get acquainted with the complexities of a work of art as a cultural manifestation and with the ways in which various artists, writers and translators have attempted to recreate these complexities in other languages and cultures. Prerequisite: Students must have met the University of Illinois foreign language requirement.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities ? Lit & Arts

TRST 400   Translation in the EU   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Focuses on language policy and the role of the translator as mediator and communicator in Europe's multilingual and multicultural societies. Discusses why the EU project depends on the concept of "living together" across languages and cultures and how translation is done in EU institutions and other international organizations. Seeks to answer the question of how multilingual individuals are trained and how they apply their skills to ensure that the multicultural project that the European Union represents will flourish thanks to this diversity, rather than being hampered by it. Preparatory for the study abroad course in Summer I in the European Union, but can be taken whether or not a student studies abroad in the EU. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

TRST 401   Translation Study Abroad   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Two to four-week intensive study abroad course in the EU that studies the dynamics of language and the language policy in the EU and provides hands-on experience with the translator's role and responsibility as mediator and communicator in today's European multi-lingual and multi-cultural societies. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Students must have met the University of Illinois foreign language requirement. Departmental approval.

TRST 404   Bilingualism and Translation   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Studies selected writings by authors published bilingually to reflect on the ways in which the practice of translation may be informed by self-translation, and to encounter biographical aspect of bilingualism that directly relates to translators' self-perception and the experience of translation. The emphasis is on how authors' strategies in self-translation compare with the strategies of a translator and how bilingualism relates to self, creativity, national identity, and politics. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Students must have met the University of Illinois foreign language requirement.

TRST 405   Commercial & Technical Trans   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Theoretical and practical aspects of commercial and technical translation resulting in a portfolio of business and technical documents relating to a fictional business. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Six semesters of foreign language study.

TRST 406   Translation for Professions   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Develop the practice of "instrumental" translation skills in a variety of technical domains, including translation for new media, medical and legal translation, and localization. Focuses on the technical, cultural and terminological problems that characterize localization and globalization as governing criteria of translation in today's knowledge economy. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Six semesters of foreign language study.

TRST 407   Terminology and CAT   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

The theoretical and practical aspects of terminology studies, as well as the computer skills required of a translator in today's Language Service Provider (LSP) environment, mastery of a variety of computer-assisted translation (CAT) tools and the SDL Trados suite. Practical applications of terminology work include advanced Internet research for translation work, terminology "mining" exercises, construction of terminology databases and management of those databases. Terminology theory is situated within the field of translation studies as derived from the discipline of linguistics. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Six semesters of foreign language study.

TRST 408   Translation Tools & Practice   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

An advanced tools course that provides familiarity with a range of CAT tools and also localization software. Combines the most up-to-date theoretical studies on translation/localization practices with hands-on activities aimed at having students understand and reflect, by using the tools, on the language, culture- and content-bound issues that translation professionals face when adapting content from an L1 to an L2 culture. Standard industry tolls will be used in class and for assignments. The class will be structured into three main units: Corpus Generation, Website/Software Localization and Machine Translation. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

TRST 410   Translation Theory & Practice   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Study of the history, theory and methods of literary translation and the practice of literary translation as we engage in our own work as translators. Examines the growing importance of translation studies as a rapidly expanding field which examines the close relationships between language and culture, language and art, and broad questions of intercultural exchange. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

TRST 415   Machine Translation: History and Applications   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Explores the 60-year history of using computers to translate human languages, from the 1954 Georgetown experiment to the present. Explores the dominant symbolic and statistical paradigms that have defined machine translation, and the positive and negative dynamics that human translators have experienced when interacting with machine translation systems. Provides hands-on experience with machine translation today. Same as LING 415. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

TRST 420   Translation Practice   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Introduction to a variety of issues focused on how to approach translation projects including a study of text types and genres, the formal properties of texts, grammatical and syntactical issues of translating, questions of linguistic register, considerations of the target audience, the meaning of "localization", cultural and ethical concerns and strategies of compensation. The importance of studying a text and making strategic decisions before starting a translation will be emphasized and discussed, as well as the crucial step of revising and editing the translated text. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Six semesters of foreign language study.

TRST 440   Translation Studies Capstone   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Capstone project in translation done under the supervision of a mentor or instructor in a specialized area of translation according to the student's area of interest and language pair. Possible specializations include literary, technical, commercial, legal, medical, or translation for new media. The student may combine the project with an internship or apprenticeship in an appropriate organization, such as a health center, courthouse, international corporation, government or non-governmental agency, or a publishing house. Students must complete a contract with the instructor or mentor prior to initiating the project and meet with the advisor weekly. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: TRST 407 and TRST 410. Six semesters of foreign language study.

TRST 500   Translation and Interpretation: Reflective Practice   credit: 4 Hours.

Exploration of the ethical and epistemological dimensions of translation and interpreting. Through discussion of primary texts and case studies, this course aims to take students beyond codified codes of professional ethics to discover the intellectual traditions (e.g., hermeneutics and philosophy of language, critical social theory, virtue ethics, etc.) that frame reflective practice. Topics include the nature of language, dialogue across difference, and the crafting of a personally fulfilling and morally responsive life of practice. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Prerequisite: TRST 410 or consent of instructor.

TRST 501   Applied Literary Translation I   credit: 4 Hours.

Focuses on both the theory and the practice of literary translation, as well as the business aspect of how to negotiate a translation proposal through the US publishing market. Students will produce a completed translation of a short story or a selection of poems.

TRST 502   Applied LiteraryTranslation II   credit: 4 Hours.

Focuses on the practice and strategies of literary translation through the study of what prominent and successful translators have written about their own experience and through comparative analysis of prize-winning translations. Students will be exposed to reader response theory and the role of the translator as cultural agent while learning how to produce paratext for their translations (prefaces, notes, etc.) and developing skills in translation, editing, grant-writing, and participation in professional associations. Prerequisite: TRST 501 or consent of unit.

TRST 540   Translation Capstone   credit: 4 Hours.

Graduate level capstone project in translation done under the supervision of a mentor or instructor in a specialized area of translation according to the student's area of interest and language pair. The possible specializations include literary, technical, commercial, legal, medical, or translation for film and new media. The student may combine the project with an internship or apprenticeship in an appropriate organization, such as a health center, courthouse, international corporation, governmental or non-governmental organization, or a publishing house. Students must complete a contract with the instructor or mentor prior to initiating the project and must meet weekly with the advisor. Prerequisites: TRST 407, 410, and 500. Students must be in the final stages of their graduate work in translation studies.

TRST 541   Community Interpreting   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduction to community interpreting and its main theoretical concepts, including what is interpreting, interpreting as process, and what is community interpreting. The major areas of community interpreting will be introduced including interpreting in the medical and legal contexts. The interpreter code of ethics and ethical dilemmas of the interpreter will be introduced and analyzed. Prerequisite: Admission to the Masters in Translation and Interpretation.

TRST 542   Conference Interpreting   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduction to conference interpreting as its main theoretical concepts, including what is interpreting, interpreting as process, and what is conference interpreting. Core skills will be introduced and practiced, such as understanding the spoken language and language analysis techniques, acquisition of subject matter knowledge, terminology management, verbal expression skills, interpreting in practice, and mastery of the technologist of the interpreter booth. Interpreting practice in the student's language pairs will be a part of the course. Prerequisite: Admission to the Masters in Translation and Interpretation.

TRST 580   Special Topics in Translation   credit: 4 Hours.

Covers topics of special interests to rising professional translators in the three areas of specialization of the MA in Translation and Interpreting: Applied Literary Translation, Translation for the Professions and Interpreting. Examples of topics may include: Translation for Government, Literary Translation, Translation and Digital Humanities. May be repeated in separate terms for a maximum of 8 hours.