Translation Studies (TRST)

TRST Class Schedule

Courses

TRST 201   Intro to Translation Studies   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to translation as an academic discipline and professional field through a series of texts in translation. Explores the ways in which texts, images, and ideas move across cultures, across time, across languages, and through different art forms; to elevate the students' appreciation of literature and other art forms; and get acquainted with the complexities of a work of art as a cultural manifestation and with the ways in which various artists, writers and translators have attempted to recreate these complexities in other languages and cultures. Prerequisite: Students must have met the University of Illinois foreign language requirement.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Lit & Arts

TRST 405   Commercial & Technical Trans   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Theoretical and practical aspects of commercial and technical translation resulting in a portfolio of business and technical documents relating to a fictional business. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Six semesters of foreign language study.

TRST 406   Translation for Professions   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Develop the practice of "instrumental" translation skills in a variety of technical domains, including translation for new media, medical and legal translation, and localization. Focuses on the technical, cultural and terminological problems that characterize localization and globalization as governing criteria of translation in today's knowledge economy. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Six semesters of foreign language study.

TRST 407   Terminology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Provides a foundation in terminology management theory and practice. Key principles, including concept orientation, term autonomy, data granularity, and interchange standards are emphasized. Practical skills learned include performing term extraction, creating a terminology database (termbase), using the termbase as an aid when translating a text, and developing interpreter-oriented formats. Requires access to a computer running Windows. Prerequisite: Six semesters of studyof a non-English language or equivalent competence. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Six semesters of study of a non-English language or equivalent competence.

TRST 410   Translation and Interpreting Theory & Practice   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Study of the theory and methods of translation and interpreting. Emphasis is on contemporary theoretical trends in the translation and interpreting fields, and practical application of theoretical models. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

TRST 415   Machine Translation: History and Applications   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Explores the 60-year history of using computers to translate human languages, from the 1954 Georgetown experiment to the present. Explores the dominant symbolic and statistical paradigms that have defined machine translation, and the positive and negative dynamics that human translators have experienced when interacting with machine translation systems. Provides hands-on experience with machine translation today. Same as LING 415. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

TRST 432   Audio Visual Translation Studies   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examination of how subtitles are produced, how multimodal translation works, the growing discipline of audiovisual translation, as well as hands-on training in subtitling. Students will review the history of audiovisual translation, practice using subtitling software, and produce their own subtitles for segments of films they select. Students may work from any other language into English. Access to a PC computer strongly encouraged. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Six semesters of foreign language study at the college level, or equivalent competence.

TRST 440   Translation Studies Capstone   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Capstone project in translation done under the supervision of a mentor or instructor in a specialized area of translation according to the student's area of interest and language pair. Possible specializations include literary, technical, commercial, legal, medical, or translation for new media. The student may combine the project with an internship or apprenticeship in an appropriate organization, such as a health center, courthouse, international corporation, government or non-governmental agency, or a publishing house. Students must complete a contract with the instructor or mentor prior to initiating the project and meet with the advisor weekly. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: TRST 407 and TRST 410. Six semesters of foreign language study.

TRST 500   Translation and Interpretation: Reflective Practice   credit: 4 Hours.

Exploration of the ethical and epistemological dimensions of translation and interpreting. Through discussion of primary texts and case studies, this course aims to take students beyond codified codes of professional ethics to discover the intellectual traditions (e.g., hermeneutics and philosophy of language, critical social theory, virtue ethics, etc.) that frame reflective practice. Topics include the nature of language, dialogue across difference, and the crafting of a personally fulfilling and morally responsive life of practice. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Prerequisite: TRST 410 or consent of instructor.

TRST 501   Applied Literary Translation I   credit: 4 Hours.

Focuses on both the theory and the practice of literary translation, as well as the business aspect of how to negotiate a translation proposal through the US publishing market. Students will produce a completed translation of a short story or a selection of poems. Same as CWL 511, EALC 511, GER 511, and SLAV 501. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit.

TRST 502   Applied LiteraryTranslation II   credit: 4 Hours.

Focuses on the practice and strategies of literary translation through the study of what prominent and successful translators have written about their own experience and through comparative analysis of prize-winning translations. Students will be exposed to reader response theory and the role of the translator as cultural agent while learning how to produce paratext for their translations (prefaces, notes, etc.) and developing skills in translation, editing, grant-writing, and participation in professional associations. Same as CWL 512, EALC 512, GER 512, and SLAV 502. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Prerequisite: TRST 501 or consent of unit.

TRST 503   Computer-Assisted Translation   credit: 4 Hours.

A foundation course in the history, technical underpinnings and functionality of computer-assisted translation (CAT), a central component of the translation industry. Students work with several CAT tools, including SDL Trados Studio, the recognized industry standard. Students learn the functions and features of CAT including Project set-up, Translation Memory, Termbase, Alignment, File filters, Quality Assurance, Reports, Review files, Machine Translation, and Autosuggest dictionaries. Certification in SDL Trados Studio and memoQ is optional. All students require a computer running Windows, with administrator access for installing software. For campus students, this should be a laptop that can be brought to class. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit.

TRST 508   Localization   credit: 4 Hours.

Combines theories of localization with hands-on activities using a range of computer-assisted translation (CAT) and localization tools. Students explore and reflect on the issues that translators face when adapting content from one language and culture to another. Students also learn state-of-the-art tools and techniques for localizing software, mobile apps, SEO keywords, and web sites. Markup languages, localization project management, and standards for the language industry are also introduced. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Prerequisite: TRST 503. Students must be enrolled in the MA in Translation and Interpreting or in the program in Translation Studies (certificate or planned minor).

TRST 540   Translation Capstone   credit: 4 Hours.

Graduate level capstone project in translation done under the supervision of a mentor or instructor in a specialized area of translation according to the student's area of interest and language pair. The possible specializations include literary, technical, commercial, legal, medical, or translation for film and new media. The student may combine the project with an internship or apprenticeship in an appropriate organization, such as a health center, courthouse, international corporation, governmental or non-governmental organization, or a publishing house. Students must complete a contract with the instructor or mentor prior to initiating the project and must meet weekly with the advisor. Prerequisites: TRST 407, 410, and 500. Students must be in the final stages of their graduate work in translation studies.

TRST 541   Community Interpreting   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduction to community interpreting and its main theoretical concepts, including what is interpreting, interpreting as process, and what is community interpreting. The major areas of community interpreting will be introduced, including interpreting in the medical and legal contexts. The interpreter code of ethics and ethical dilemmas of the interpreter will be introduced and analyzed. Prerequisite: Admission to the MA program in Translation and Interpreting or consent of instructor. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the MA in Translation and Interpreting or instructor's permission.

TRST 542   Conference Interpreting   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduction to conference interpreting and its main theoretical concepts, including what is interpreting, interpreting as process, and what is conference interpreting. Core skills will be introduced and practiced, such as understanding the spoken language and language analysis techniques, acquisition of subject matter knowledge, terminology management, verbal expression skills, interpreting in practice, and mastery of the technology of the interpreter booth. Interpreting practice in the students' language pairs will be a part of the course. Prerequisite: Admission to the MA program in Translation and Interpreting or consent of instructor. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the MA in Translation and Interpreting or instructor's permission.

TRST 580   Special Topics in Translation   credit: 4 Hours.

Covers topics of special interests to rising professional translators in the three areas of specialization of the MA in Translation and Interpreting: Applied Literary Translation, Translation for the Professions and Interpreting. Examples of topics may include: Translation for Government, Literary Translation, Translation and Digital Humanities. May be repeated in separate terms for a maximum of 8 hours.