Sociology (SOC)

SOC Class Schedule

Courses

SOC 100   Introduction to Sociology   credit: 4 Hours.

Examination of how societies grow and change; reciprocal effects of economic, political, community, familial, and scientific institutions on each other and on individual life changes; and social conflict, problems of bureaucratic growth and planned and unplanned social change.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences

SOC 101   Sociology of Gender   credit: 3 Hours.

An exploration of current questions of gender and their applications to students today. The course will focus primarily on the United States emphasizing individual, interactional, and institutional aspects of the social world. Topics for study include sociological research on femininities, masculinities, gendered bodies, socialization, work, family, politics, sport, and sexualities.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences

SOC 108   Religion & Society in West I   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as ANTH 108, JS 108, PHIL 108, and REL 108. See REL 108.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Hist&Philosoph Perspect
UIUC: Western Compartv Cult

SOC 109   Religion & Society in West II   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as ANTH 109, PHIL 109, and REL 109. See REL 109.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Hist&Philosoph Perspect
UIUC: Western Compartv Cult

SOC 122   Africa in World Perspective   credit: 3 Hours.

Examination of Africa in the context of the world-economy, with particular attention placed upon enduring cultural and material relationships with Europe and North America.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Non-Western Cultures
UIUC: Social Sciences

SOC 124   Asian American Cultures   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as AAS 184 and ANTH 184. See ANTH 184.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences
UIUC: US Minority Culture(s)

SOC 130   Intro Gender & Women's Studies   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as GWS 100 and HDFS 140. See GWS 100.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences

SOC 152   The New Middle East   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as PS 152 and SAME 152. See PS 152.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Non-Western Cultures
UIUC: Social Sciences

SOC 160   Global Ineq and Social Change   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduces sociological concepts of poverty, inequality, and social change within a global context. Themes explored include basic food security, poverty and hunger; population and resource distribution; foreign aid and development institutions; and social policies and movements for change. Course approach is historical and transnational, and typically includes case studies from Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the United States. This course can be used to fulfill either Western or Nonwestern general education categories, but not both.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Non-Western Cultures
UIUC: Social Sciences
UIUC: Western Compartv Cult

SOC 162   Intro to Intl Health Policy   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduces students to international health policy. Students will learn about data sources, basic analytical techniques, and theoretical frameworks for understanding international health policy. From a sociological perspective, students will explore why health issues are essential components to discussion of globalization, immigration, and migration. Students also will learn how health policy and foreign policy decisions in the developed world influence health policy and health care delivery in the developing world.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences
UIUC: Western Compartv Cult

SOC 163   Social Problems   credit: 3 Hours.

A study of social problems in the United States necessarily entails a discussion of global issues. To that end, this course will examine many contemporary social issues such as crime, war and terrorism, the environment, inequality, poverty, discrimination, the economic recession, and others, through a global framework. Many of the topics we will cover could motivate an entire semester's study in their own right; indeed, some scholars devote their entire careers to but one of these topics. However, this breadth allows us to think broadly about the issues that are identified as social problems and the ways in which individuals and groups attempt to resolve those problems; both processes are revealing about the time and society in which we live. One of the main objectives of this class is to learn about how sociologists examine social problems through analysis and research. Alongside that process, you will improve your critical thinking skills and become a better/more informed consumer of information.

SOC 179   Social Organization   credit: 3 Hours.

Beginning with an examination of various examples of organizing, from street gangs to industrial corporations and modern universities, this course will discuss common patterns in organizational phenomena. Basic conceptual frameworks will be provided in the context of contemporary and local problems, illustrating the core issues.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences

SOC 196   Issues in Sociology   credit: 3 Hours.

Origin of problems; consequences of ameliorative strategies. Typical topics include crime, mental illness, drug use, suicide, sexual behavior, violence, and intergroup conflict. May be repeated as topics vary.

SOC 199   Undergraduate Open Seminar   credit: 1 to 5 Hours.

Approved for both letter and S/U grading. May be repeated.

SOC 200   Intro to Sociological Theory   credit: 3 Hours.

Analysis of such classical theorists as Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and Mead and contemporary theorists. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

SOC 201   Race, Gender & Power   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as GWS 201. See GWS 201.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Western Compartv Cult

SOC 202   Sexualities   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as GWS 202. See GWS 202.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Western Compartv Cult

SOC 221   Mexican & Latin Am Migration   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as LLS 220. See LLS 220.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences

SOC 222   Introduction to Modern Africa   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as AFST 222, ANTH 222, and PS 242. See AFST 222.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Non-Western Cultures

SOC 224   Asian Am Historical Sociology   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as AAS 224. See AAS 224.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: US Minority Culture(s)

SOC 225   Race and Ethnicity   credit: 3 Hours.

Sociological and social-psychological analysis of minority groups; illustrative material drawn from representative racial, ethnic, and status groups. Prerequisite: SOC 100, SOC 101, OR SOC 163.

SOC 226   Political Sociology   credit: 3 Hours.

Study of power relations within and between the state, bureaucracy, community, social classes, and elites in the United States and other countries.

SOC 227   Latina/Latinos in the Contemporary United States   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the incorporation of the major Latina/Latino subgroups into United States society, surveys the major theoretical approaches that have been used in the social sciences to explain majority-Latino relations, and provides an empirical overview of how major social institutions affect the daily lives of Latina/Latinos. Same as LLS 227. Prerequisite: One of the following: LLS 100, SOC 100, SOC 101, SOC 163, or consent of instructor.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: US Minority Culture(s)

SOC 249   Sport & Modern Society   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as KIN 249. See KIN 249.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences

SOC 261   Gender in a Transnational Perspective   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines how gender inequality is structured on a transnational level. Emphasis will be placed on the interactive relationship among various countries, and how globalization promotes racial, ethnic, sexual, and national hierarchies among women, in both newly and advanced industrialized countries. Same as GWS 261. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 100, SOC 101, SOC 163, or consent of instructor.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences

SOC 267   Pan Africanism   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as AFRO 243, AFST 243, and PS 243. See PS 243.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Non-Western Cultures
UIUC: Social Sciences

SOC 269   Food, Culture, and Society   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as ANTH 209. See ANTH 209.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences

SOC 270   Population Issues   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the current world population situation; the historical and current patterns of birth, death, migration, marriage, contraception, and abortion; and the world food and energy resources, crowding, and problems of overpopulation. Same as RSOC 270.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences

SOC 273   Social Perspectives on the Family   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the societal forces shaping aspects of stable and changing family relations in the U. S. and other countries; focuses on social-structural factors affecting marriage, divorce, co-habitation, child-bearing, the division of work and authority, and other features of life. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 100, SOC 101, or SOC 163.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences

SOC 274   Introduction to Medical Sociology   credit: 3 Hours.

Sociology of health and illness behavior and the social structure of systems which deliver health care services; includes social constraints on illness, the illness role, medical organizations and professions, and the application of the illness model to deviant forms of behavior. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 100, SOC 101, or SOC 163.

SOC 275   Criminology   credit: 3 Hours.

Nature and extent of crime; past and present theories of crime causation; criminal behavior in the United States and abroad, and its relation to personal, structural and cultural conditions; the nature of the criminal justice system and the influences of the exercise of discretion among actors in the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 100, SOC 101, SOC 163 or equivalent.

SOC 280   Intro to Social Statistics   credit: 4 Hours.

First course in social statistics for students without mathematics beyond the high school level; topics include the role of statistics in social science inquiry, measures of central tendency and dispersion, simple correlation techniques, contingency analysis, and introduction to statistical inference; includes the statistical analysis of social science data using personal computers. Same as GEOG 280. Credit is not given for SOC 280 if credit for a college level introductory statistics course has been earned.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Quant Reasoning I

SOC 287   Environment and Society   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as ESE 287, GEOG 287, PS 273 and NRES 287. See NRES 287.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences
UIUC: Western Compartv Cult

SOC 310   Sociology of Deviance   credit: 3 Hours.

Study of traits, conditions, actions, and behaviors that violate social norms and elicit negative societal reactions. Explores social, cultural and individual factors in the etiology of deviance; the establishment and maintenance of deviant categories; the motivations behind deviant behavior; the identification as deviant of individuals and of particular segments of society, by formal and informal means; the effects of institutionalization and social control upon the deviant; and the efforts of deviants to eradicate the label society has placed upon them. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 100, SOC 101, or SOC 163.

SOC 328   Asian Americans & Inequalities   credit: 3 Hours.

An examination of various forms of social inequality between Asian Americans and other groups as well as among Asian Americans, including those based on race, gender, class, citizenship and sexuality. Same as AAS 328. Prerequisite: SOC 100 and/or AAS 100 are recommended.

SOC 350   Technology and Society   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the social and cultural origins of modern technology and technological innovation; the effects of technology and its change on society. Topics include the impact of technology on beliefs and values, accommodation and resistance to change, and technology and the Third World.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences

SOC 364   Impacts of Globalization   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduces sociological theory and research on globalization, in debate with the literature on modernization, world-systems, and development/underdevelopment. Explores recent economic, political, and cultural change at macro-sociological level. Themes include: global governance and world society, global diffusion of American culture, global capitalism, and new forms of social resistance. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 100, SOC 101, SOC 163, or consent of instructor.

SOC 365   Contemporary Korean Society   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as EALC 365. See EALC 365.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Non-Western Cultures
UIUC: Social Sciences

SOC 366   Postsocialism Eastern Europe   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the sociological realities of state socialism and postsocialism in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 100, SOC 101, SOC 163, HIST 142, PS 100, or any REES course.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences
UIUC: Western Compartv Cult

SOC 367   Globalization Dynamics Debates   credit: 3 Hours.

Study of the multidimensional character of globalization. Discussion of key processes of globalization and areas of consensus and controversy in the literature, including major current controversies such as are we headed for a global monoculture; what is the relationship between globalization and neoliberal capitalism; which trend is more significant, globalization or empire? Discussions on scenarios and policy options of global futures.

SOC 373   Social Stratification   credit: 3 Hours.

Inequities in power, prestige, income, privilege, and lifestyles in the United States and other countries; class and status as determinants of group interests, ideologies, and interaction; and effects of social change and mobility. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 100, SOC 101, or SOC 163.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences

SOC 374   Immigrants in the U.S.   credit: 3 Hours.

The change in origin country composition of U.S. immigrants changed dramatically post-1965 from what it was in the early twentieth century and this shift has generated much public and policy concern over the 'new" immigrants and their prospects for economic mobility and integration. Since immigration shows no signs of slowing down, its causes and consequences remain some of the most important topics of the 21st century. Some of the questions considered in this course include: Why do immigrants come to the U.S.; Is the average human capital level of immigrants declining?; Are the new immigrants assimilating into U.S. society and what does that mean? Also examines the economic impact of immigration and considers appropriate policy recommendations such as whether the U.S. should adopt a skill-based point system to regulate immigration. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 100, SOC 101, or SOC 163.

SOC 375   Criminal Justice System   credit: 3 Hours.

Exploration of the actors, institutions, and processes that make up the criminal justice system. We review sociological and other social scientific research on topics including the police, prosecutors, the courtroom work-group, forensic evidence, juries, sentencing, and the impact of mass incarceration. Grades are based on exams, research exercises, and ethnographic observations of criminal courtrooms. Prerequisite: SOC 275 is recommended.

SOC 378   Law and Society   credit: 3 Hours.

Examination of law and legal institutions sociologically. We begin with an introduction to theoretical perspectives on the problem of order, illustrated by juxtaposing formal law with other means of achieving order. Next, we consider law and legal systems in action, including relations between law and the economy, stratification, culture, ideology and social change. Finally, we investigate the relationship between law's aims and principles, and law's real-world implementation.

SOC 380   Social Research Methods   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduction to the foundations of social research and to the major types of research methods employed in sociology. Provides exposure to the major tools and terminology of social research, including the use of computers in sociology. Topics include: research design, finding and using sociology literature, measurement, sampling, survey research, field methods, use of available data, quantitative data analysis and presentation, and computer resources for research. Prerequisite: SOC 280 and one of the following: SOC 100, SOC 101, or SOC 163.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Quant Reasoning II

SOC 390   Individual Study   credit: 1 to 6 Hours.

Individual study or research project. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Six hours of sociology; written consent of instructor on form available in the Sociology Department Office.

SOC 392   Chicanas&Latinas: Self&Society   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as GWS 392 and LLS 392. See LLS 392.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Advanced Composition

SOC 396   Topics in Sociology   credit: 3 Hours.

Explores topics not covered in regularly scheduled Sociology courses. See Class Schedule for topics. May be repeated if topics vary. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 100, SOC 101, SOC 163, or consent of instructor.

SOC 400   Internships   credit: 0 to 3 Hours.

Selected internship opportunities in which student and faculty member develop a program of study and research related to internship. Consult departmental undergraduate advisor. 0 to 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Approved for Letter and S/U grading. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing; and SOC 100 or SOC 101 or SOC 163; and six additional hours in Sociology or acceptance of faculty member and Director of Undergraduate Studies.

SOC 426   Race, Ed Pol, and Soc Science   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examination of the origins and development of sociology as a discipline, as related to the sociology of education, and the reproduction of social and racial inequality. The course focuses on four issues: the production of racial inequality in social scientific knowledge, the role that social science plays in reproducing societal patterns of race, class, and gender inequality, the development of sociology and education in the United States and Africa, and the development of American social science and the reproduction of global inequality. Same as EPS 422. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

SOC 447   Environmental Sociology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examination of historical and modern consequences of environmental alteration and pollution and resource limitations on human populations in the context of various social change theories. Explores the environmental movement, population explosion, the "limits to growth debate," and the impacts of environmental change on food production, land, and water quality. Same as ENVS 447 and RSOC 447. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: SOC 380 or equivalent; and one of the following: SOC 100, SOC 101, SOC 163, RSOC 110, or equivalent; or consent of instructor.

SOC 450   Senior Capstone Seminar   credit: 3 Hours.

Over the course of the semester, students will conceive and execute an original sociological research project, using their knowledge of the sociological literature developed in substantive courses and their skills in data collection and analysis developed in methods courses. In parallel, students will explore professional opportunities in sociology and engage in professional development activities, including exploring opportunities for graduate education and learning skills in job search, and resume, c.v., personal statement and cover letter development. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 100, SOC 101 or SOC 163; and SOC 380. For Sociology majors only.

SOC 470   Social Movements   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

Origins and development of groups in promoting and resisting change, resource mobilization, strategies and tactics, individual and social consequences. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 100, SOC 101, SOC 163, or six hours of anthropology, social geography, political science, or sociology.

SOC 471   Collective Action & Revolution   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Contemporary theory and research on the life course of social gatherings ranging from small scale and local to nationwide collective actions by people in pursuit of social and political change. Discusses the logic of practice in political, religious and street crowds; collective action of disperse people; and broad-based revolutionary mobilizations. Cases include pre-modern and modern movements from the western and non-western societies. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: SOC 200, or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

SOC 474   Population Trends and Patterns   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Introduction to contemporary demographic patterns and their historical development; transition theory and other models of demographic change; components of population growth and distribution; and trends and differentials in mortality and fertility. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

SOC 477   Sociology of Law   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

Social origins and consequences of law and legal process, emphasizing problems of legal change and structure and function of legal sanctions. Law and law-like phenomena in primitive and modern societies. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 100, SOC 101, SOC 163, or six hours of anthropology, social geography, political science, or sociology.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Advanced Composition

SOC 480   Methods of Field Research   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

Instruction, training, and supervised practice in methods of field research as a basic tool of sociology; emphasis on the role of the field researcher as participant, observer, and interviewer in various kinds of research settings, and on approaches to and applications of field data. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: SOC 380 or consent of instructor.

SOC 481   Survey Research   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Principles and applications of social science survey research methods; class project designing and conducting a sample survey; training and experience in analysis of survey data; sampling, questionnaire construction, interviewing and data reduction, and file management; and direct use of the computer in survey data analysis. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: SOC 380 or consent of instructor.

SOC 483   Middle Eastern Societies & Cultures   credit: 3 Hours.

Overview of the contemporary Middle East from social, political, and cultural perspectives. Explores how the internal dynamics together with the forces of globalization shape the societies of the Middle East today. Topics include social structure, political dynamics, family, gender, urban life Islam, social and religious movements. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 100, SOC 101, SOC 163, or six hours of Anthropology, Social Geography, Politics, or Sociology.

SOC 484   African Urbanization   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examines the causes and consequences of African urbanization in historical perspective. The course will engage with various academic theories of urbanization and seek situate the numerous topics and readings among ongoing debates. However, its substantive focus will be devoted entirely to Africa. Same as AFST 484. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

SOC 485   Intermediate Social Statistics   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Intermediate course in the theory and application of statistical methods to social science data. Coverage includes overviews of measurement issues, the logic of hypothesis testing and estimation, the general linear model, one-way analysis of variance, correlation and regression. The core of the course is multiple regression analysis and its extensions. Topics include dummy variable analysis, statistical interaction, model assumptions and violations, non-linear and logistic regression, and an introduction to path analysis. Emphasis on the application of statistical computing packages (e. g. SPSS) and the substantive interpretation of results. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Credit is not given for both SOC 485 and another course with a primary focus on applied multiple regression analysis such as ECON 203, STAT 420, or PSYC 406. Graduate students must incorporate research literature involving statistical analysis from their discipline into their assignments and class discussions. Prerequisite: SOC 280 or equivalent.

SOC 488   Demographic Methods   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Introduction to statistical and mathematical procedures in population analysis; the gathering, processing, and evaluating of registration and census data; the life table model; and procedures of mortality and fertility analysis and population projections. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: SOC 380 or consent of instructor.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Quant Reasoning II

SOC 490   Advanced Independent Study   credit: 3 Hours.

3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Open only to seniors in the sociology major who have an overall GPA of 3.25 or higher and therefore may be eligible for departmental distinction; obtain written consent of instructor on form available in the Sociology Department Office.

SOC 495   Senior Honors Seminar   credit: 3 Hours.

Intensive scrutiny of current literature on one selected topic. Critical reading and discussion followed by writing essays and research proposals. Subject will shift yearly. There may be community work as an aspect of this course; consult the Class Schedule for details. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: For sociology majors only. Student must have at least 3.5 grade-point average in sociology courses and consent of instructor.

SOC 496   Advanced Topics in Sociology   credit: 3 Hours.

Explores topics not covered in regularly scheduled Sociology courses. See Class Schedule for topics. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated if topics vary. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 100, SOC 101, SOC 163, or consent of instructor.

SOC 500   Classical Sociological Theory   credit: 4 Hours.

Analysis of major classical sociological theorists of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, stressing the social, historical, and philosophic foundations of sociological theory; primary emphasis on Marx, Durkheim, and Weber. Prerequisite: SOC 200 or equivalent.

SOC 501   Contemp Sociological Theory   credit: 4 Hours.

Major theorists and schools of thought since World War I with emphasis on the contemporary period; includes functionalism, exchange theory, conflict theory, symbolic interaction, and phenomenology. Prerequisite: SOC 500 or equivalent.

SOC 505   Seminars in Sociology   credit: 1 Hour.

Provides Sociology graduate students the opportunity to attend and discuss presentations in department and campus seminars. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated to a maximum of 4 hours in separate terms. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Sociology and consent of the Director of Graduate Studies.

SOC 510   Professionalization Seminar   credit: 2 Hours.

Introduction to the graduate program in Sociology and to graduate study in the discipline of Sociology. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 4 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Sociology and consent of the Director of Graduate Studies.

SOC 521   Sociology of Race and Racism   credit: 4 Hours.

Examination of the social construction of race and racism, in various cultural contexts and historical moments and in relation to various groups and research problems.

SOC 532   Access to Justice   credit: 4 Hours.

Explores contemporary issues related to the ability of the public to access "justice". The course examines different perspectives on what justice is, the barriers to obtaining justice through the formal legal system, and the potential solutions to overcoming these barriers. Course readings emphasize empirical research.

SOC 560   Globalization Dynamics Debates   credit: 4 Hours.

An advanced study of the multidimensional character of globalization. Discussion of key processes of globalization and areas of consensus and controversy in the literature and examination of the premises of major approaches to globalization in social science and fundamental analytical questions and policy dilemmas that globalization presents. Discussions on scenarios and policy options of global futures.

SOC 561   Development Theories   credit: 4 Hours.

Discussion of major trends in development thinking and policy, and development theories from the classics in political economy through modernization theory, dependency, alternative development, neoliberalism, human development and post-development. Addresses ongoing challenges and debates such as globalization and democratization, and trends in social science, such as discourse analysis. Enables participants to assess development theories in a historical context and from the viewpoint of sociology of development knowledge.

SOC 562   Sem in Transnational Studies   credit: 4 Hours.

Intensive study of a selected area in transnational sociology, e.g., diasporas, global political economy, global environmental studies, transnational racial stratification, etc. May be repeated in the same or separate terms to a maximum of 8 hours as topics vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

SOC 564   Global Religion and Politics   credit: 4 Hours.

Explores the reasons behind the world-wide rise of religion as a key player in the public sphere, and the implications for politics in the contemporary world. The major religions of the world are considered, but with a focus on the Islamic revival and Muslim societies. Students will learn about the secularization debate, religious revivals and globalization, global fundamentalisms, religion and democracy, and post-secular and post-Islamist societies. Same as REL 564 and SAME 564.

SOC 565   Megacities of Global South   credit: 4 Hours.

Exploration of the dynamics of urban life in the megacities of the Global South. Studies the ways in which the global, social, and economic restructuring is affecting urban space and people and how urban inhabitants respond to these merging circumstances. Focuses on the way in which politics is articulated in the megacities of the Global South. The course discusses cases from the Middle East, Latin America, Africa and South Asia. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

SOC 571   Demography and Human Ecology   credit: 4 Hours.

Classic and contemporary issues and perspectives in demography and human ecology, emphasizing the relationship between demographic phenomena and social life and on the ecological approach to social organization; demographic change, analytic methods in demography, fertility, mortality, and migration; new research developments. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

SOC 580   Advanced Interpretive Methods   credit: 4 Hours.

Analysis of social interaction based on the social psychology of C. H. Cooley, G. H. Mead, and W. I. Thomas; presentation of problems of theory, concepts, and method. Same as MDIA 580. Prerequisite: 4 hours graduate credit in sociology.

SOC 581   Survey Research Methods I   credit: 4 Hours.

Advanced course in the design of social surveys and collection of social survey data; covers stages from questionnaire construction to preparing data for statistical analysis; issues in survey design involving cross-national, longitudinal and multi-group research. Prerequisite: SOC 485 or equivalent.

SOC 582   Survey Research Methods II   credit: 4 Hours.

Laboratory course in survey research methods to provide students with advanced training and experience in problem formulation and computerized data analysis using statistical packages, e.g., SPSS; under staff guidance, a student will select a topic and write a professional-level paper. Three to ten hours of laboratory time per week.

SOC 583   Qualitative Research Methods   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduction to field and qualitative methods in social science research, in terms of both the practical issues of conducting this type of research and the conceptual debates in the field. Methods include interviewing, participant observation, unobtrusive observation, historical/archival methods, and global ethnography. May be repeated as topics vary.

SOC 586   Adv Social Statistics I   credit: 4 Hours.

Examines social science applications of the general linear model and its extensions; topics include: model specification; ordinary and generalized least squares; multicollinearity; selection of predictors; interaction of variables and non-linear regression; panel and time-series data; measurement error; path analysis; recursive and non-recursive structural equation models. Applies statistical computing packages (e.g., SPSS) to social science data. Credit is not given for both SOC 586 and PSYC 406. Prerequisite: SOC 485 or equivalent.

SOC 587   Adv Social Statistics II   credit: 4 Hours.

Examines social science applications of discrete and continuous multivariate analysis; topics include: analysis of categorical data (loglinear modelling, probit analysis, etc.); geometric interpretation of matrices; factor analysis and index construction; canonical analysis; discriminant analysis; unobserved variables and structural equation models; issues in model specification and estimation. Applies statistical computing programs such as ECTA and LISREL to social science data. Credit is not given for both SOC 587 and PSYC 407. Prerequisite: SOC 586 or equivalent.

SOC 590   Individual Topics in Sociology   credit: 1 to 8 Hours.

Supervised individual investigation or study of a topic not covered by regular courses; topic selected by the student and the proposed plan of study must be approved by the adviser and the staff member who supervises the work. Approved for letter and S/U grading. May be repeated.

SOC 596   Recent Developments in Soc   credit: 4 Hours.

Intensive study of selected topics based on contemporary works of major importance in the development of sociological theory. May be repeated if topics vary.

SOC 597   Readings in Sociology   credit: 2 to 12 Hours.

Individual guidance in intensive readings in the literature of one or more subdivisions of the field of sociology, selected in consultation with the student's advisor, in preparation for the specialization examination. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 12 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Sociology and consent of advisor.

SOC 598   Thesis Proposal   credit: 2 to 12 Hours.

Individual guidance in designing a doctoral research project and writing a thesis proposal. Focuses on developing a cogent theoretical framework, articulating significance of the project, identifying appropriate research methods, and considering ethical issues. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated in the same or separate terms to a maximum of 12 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Sociology and consent of advisor.

SOC 599   Thesis Research   credit: 0 to 16 Hours.

Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated. Prerequisite: SOC 598.