HDFS - Human Dev and Family Studies

HDFS Class Schedule

Courses

HDFS 101   Opportunities, Careers in HDFS   credit: 1 Hour.

Opportunities and Careers in HDFS explores the opportunities in the department of Human Development and Family Studies. The course also teaches students about careers related to the major.

HDFS 105   Intro to Human Development   credit: 3 Hours.

Systematic overview of the psychological, biological, familial, and cultural factors related to human growth and development across the life span.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Beh Sci

HDFS 108   Grief and Loss Across the Lifespan   credit: 3 Hours.

Educates students on the impact of grief and loss from the perspective of human development. Begins by exploring different types of grief and loss and the importance of studying this topic, especially for those students seeking professions in healthcare and social service settings. Utilizes developmental theories as we look across the lifespan at how individuals’ approach and understand death, the coping strategies utilized to confront grief/loss and ways to support individuals experiencing the plethora of feelings that accompany grief/loss.

HDFS 120   Intro to Family Studies   credit: 3 Hours.

Overview of current concepts, theories, and substantive issues in family studies from an interdisciplinary perspective. Gives attention to variation in family form and function across different social/cultural contexts and how family experience is structured by gender. Examines issues of family development (marriage, parenting, divorce, remarriage, aging family) and explores the links between families and other social institutions.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

HDFS 140   Intro Gender & Women's Studies   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as GWS 100 and SOC 130. See GWS 100.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

HDFS 143   Biology of Human Behavior   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as ANTH 143. See ANTH 143.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Nat Sci & Tech - Life Sciences

HDFS 199   Undergraduate Open Seminar   credit: 1 to 5 Hours.

Experimental course on a special topic in human development and family studies. Approved for Letter and S/U grading. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours in the same or subsequent terms, if topics vary. Credit is not given for more than a total of 12 hours of Independent Study (IND) courses applying to a degree in ACES.

HDFS 206   Early Childhood Curriculum Dev   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduces development of curriculum for children from birth to age five; integrates child development theory and principles with programming for young children in preschool and childcare setting. Prerequisite: HDFS 105.

HDFS 207   Self in Context   credit: 3 Hours.

This hands-on course uses family genograms - a version of a family tree - to explore the complexity of human experience in the context of multigenerational family systems. Students construct and analyze genograms, including their own, using family systems theory and multigenerational development perspectives. Attention is given to critically examining one's own family history as a part of professional growth. Students will practice using genograms to assess families in popular media using novels, memoirs, films, and/or television shows. Case studies will be used throughout the course to expose students to diverse family experiences with specific attention to race and sociocultural context.

HDFS 208   Child and Family Inclusion: Disability, Health, and Diversity   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides a multi-disciplinary, developmental approach to the study of disability relating to children and families. Students will explore social and emotional aspects of self-identity in children and youth with disabilities, as well as historical and social constructs around racial, cultural, and economic marginalization. The course will examine processes of identification, intervention, and integration of children who deviate significantly from developmental norms, including children who are gifted and talented. Basic introduction to Black Disability Studies, needs and preferences of Latinx families in supporting their children with disabilities, trauma-informed support, effects of the Covid 19 pandemic, neurodiversity supports relating to the attachment relationship, food insecurity and teratogens are included, as well as intersections of disability and LGBTQA+ self-identification. The course was designed for students studying child development, education, special education, social work, nursing, child life, pediatric medicine and therapies, advocacy, and other disciplines involved with children who have health concerns and/or disabilities. Prerequisite: HDFS 105.

HDFS 220   Families in Global Perspective   credit: 3 Hours.

Explores economic, political, cultural and social factors affecting families in different countries; examines variations among families in developed and developing nations and their historical, political and cultural contexts. Same as ANTH 210.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Non-West
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

HDFS 221   Asian Families in America   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as AAS 297 and SOCW 297. See SOCW 297.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci
Cultural Studies - US Minority

HDFS 225   Close Relationships   credit: 3 Hours.

Initiation, development, and dissolution of committed relationships with same- or different-sex partners within familial, cultural, and societal contexts. Prerequisite: Restricted to sophomores.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

HDFS 263   Diversity in Recreation, Sport, and Tourism   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as RST 230. See RST 230.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - US Minority

HDFS 290   Intro to Research Methods   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods used to study human development and families. Provides experience conducting observations and survey interviews, evaluating research results, and writing research reports. Prerequisite: HDFS 105 or other introductory social science course.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Advanced Composition

HDFS 291   HDFS Career Planning & Preparation   credit: 1 Hour.

Overview of job opportunities, graduate, and professional school programs that prepare students for careers in health care, counseling, social work, higher education, policymaking and other fields related to Human Development and Family Studies. Examines types of jobs, graduate and professional opportunities and the preparation they require. Students develop personal job, graduate/professional school preparation plans. Approved for S/U grading only.

HDFS 294   Research Internship   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Students work one-on-one or in a small group with a faculty member engaged in research. Students must arrange this research experience with a professor prior to registering for the course. A list of possible research projects can be found at: http://hdfs.illinois.edu/undergraduate/research-opportunities. Once you have found a project that interests you, email the professor and ask to participate in his or her research opportunity. Approved for Letter and S/U grading. May be repeated in the same or separate terms to a maximum of 12 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor; not open to students on probation.

HDFS 295   Independent Study or Research   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Individual research, special problems, thesis, development and/or design work under the supervision of an appropriate member of the faculty. May be repeated in the same or separate terms to a maximum of 12 hours. Credit is not given for more than a total of 12 hours of Independent Study (IND) courses applying to a degree in ACES.

HDFS 301   Infancy & Early Childhood   credit: 4 Hours.

Reviews development during the first five years of life, including cognitive, social, and biological aspects of early development; includes first-hand observation of young children to supplement and extend lecture material. Prerequisite: HDFS 105 or PSYC 216.

HDFS 305   Middle Childhood   credit: 3 Hours.

Systematic overview of the normative changes that occur in the physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and moral domains during the middle childhood period as well as current social issues that confront many of today's children (such as school violence or poverty). Prerequisite: HDFS 105.

HDFS 310   Adult Development   credit: 3 Hours.

Focuses on adult development as a means for understanding the quality of family relationships and community functioning. Uses current theoretical approaches to understand adult development and evaluate each approach's usefulness for adults in the contexts of family, health, work, leisure and challenges over the life course. Prerequisite: HDFS 105 or equivalent.

HDFS 320   Families and the Law   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines law from a family perspective and how the family in American society is impacted by and interacts with the legal system. Explores the concept of family from a legal perspective, as well as common family law issues including marriage, divorce, child custody, and family violence. Students will discover how family science research can impact case law and legislation, the impacts of such legislation on families, and the relationships between the fields of family science, law, and public policy. Prerequisite: HDFS 120 or SOC 100. Not intended for students with Freshman class standing.

HDFS 322   US Latina and Latino Families   credit: 3 Hours.

Explores a variety of topics and provides a basic overview of issues relevant to the understanding of Latina/Latino families and children in the United States. Examines recent demographic changes in the U.S. population and their implications for the socialization and education of Latina/Latino children and their families. Course content looks at such areas as who are Latina/Latino families; how are those families different from others; what are the similarities and differences within Latinas/Latinos; how does acculturation and language fit into our understanding of these families; and what are the implications for the education success of current and future Latina/Latino children. Same as LLS 322.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - US Minority

HDFS 330   Statistical Reasoning for Everyday Life   credit: 3 Hours.

With technological advances, we often learn of scientific breakthroughs related to health, behavior, attitudes, and beliefs as soon as they happen. Sometimes this information is contradictory or confusing. How do we know what to believe or pay attention to? Students in this course will improve their statistical literacy and learn the statistical tools professionals need to sort through scientific information and separate out the accurate and useful from the misleading and useless. Students will develop critical thinking skills and foundational understanding of statistical concepts through analysis of real-world examples. Prerequisite: STAT 100 or equivalent required. Restricted to students with Junior standing or higher.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Quantitative Reasoning II

HDFS 335   Food, Identity, & Family Life   credit: 3 Hours.

Situates family food decisions amid social positions such as race, class, gender, and sexuality. We will consider how food can be used to express identities and connect to others, but also differentiate, exclude, and disparage those who are "not like us." Through these investigations we will learn about how family food practices are shaped by social norms, institutions, and policies in areas like education, media, immigration, neighborhood zoning, and health and social services. Prerequisite: There are no formal pre-requisites for this class, but HDFS 105 or another 100- or 200-level Social and Behavioral Science general education course is strongly recommended.

HDFS 340   Gender, Relationshps & Society   credit: 3 Hours.

Explores the production of gender through social interaction within families and other specific interpersonal and institutional relationships that change over time. Gender is also linked to race, class, ability, and sexuality. Same as GWS 340 and SOC 322. Prerequisite: HDFS 105 or SOC 100.

HDFS 379   HDFS Study Abroad Experience   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

International experience in areas related to human development and family studies involving foreign travel and study without enrollment in another institution. Experience must be planned and approved in advance via consultation with an HDFS faculty member. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 8 hours if topics vary.

HDFS 396   Honors Research or Thesis   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Individual research, special problems, thesis, development and/or design work under the direction of the Honors advisor. May be repeated in separate terms. Independent Study courses are limited to 12 hours total applying to a degree in ACES. Prerequisite: Junior standing, admission to the ACES Honors Program.

HDFS 398   Undergraduate Seminar   credit: 1 to 3 Hours.

Special topics in a field of study directly pertaining to subject matter in human development and family studies. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 12 hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

HDFS 401   Socialization and Development   credit: 4 Hours.

Presents and uses theories of socialization to evaluate and analyze current issues and socialization practices; delineates historical and philosophical trends in socialization, and discusses the implications of these trends for generating social policy affecting the developing individual. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: HDFS 301 and HDFS 290.

HDFS 405   Adolescent Development   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines paths of experience and individual development within the family, the peer group, and other domains through this socially-defined stage of life. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: HDFS 105 or PSYC 100.

HDFS 406   Child Dev Class Supervision   credit: 5 Hours.

Examines the relationships between child development theories and developmentally appropriate and individualized instruction techniques, discipline and guidance strategies, and the role of the family in child development programs. Emphasizes program supervision. Includes direct experience with children and families in a laboratory setting. 5 undergraduate hours. 5 graduate hours. Prerequisite: HDFS 206, HDFS 220, and junior standing.

HDFS 408   Hospitalized Children   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examines the developmental needs and stress reactions of children and families in a hospital/medical setting; examines responses of family and staff facing terminal illness and the death of a family member; familiarizes students with general hospital procedures, medical terms, and illnesses; introduces the role of Child Life programs and the Child Life Specialist. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: HDFS 105 or consent of instructor.

HDFS 420   Inequality, Public Policy, and U.S. Families   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examines influence of economic, demographic and social changes on families in the U.S. and on the opportunities of individual family members. Explores interactions of social class, poverty, race and gender and their effects on family life and on child and adolescent development. Includes critical analysis of health care, employment, immigration, family leave, welfare and other social policy options that affect family life and well-being. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: HDFS 120.

HDFS 425   Family Stress and Change   credit: 4 Hours.

Applies family theories (e.g. family systems, family stress, multigenerational developmental perspectives) to understand how families change and adapt to stress across time and diverse contexts. Attention is given to assessing intergenerational family dynamics and working with individuals and families to reduce negative patterns. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: HDFS 120.

HDFS 426   Family Conflict Management   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examines processes of conflict management in family and community disputes; emphasizes negotiation and mediation as modes of dispute settlement. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: HDFS 120.

HDFS 444   LGBT Indiv, Fam & Community   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examines contemporary sexual and gender minority experiences in the context of societal inequality. Of particular interest to students pursuing educational, human service, legal, and/or health profession careers. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or an introductory course on gender issues.

HDFS 445   Substance Use and Family Health   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the impact of substance use on families through the social ecological framework, including biopsychosocial impacts on individuals, relationships with family members (including between partners, parents and children, siblings, extended family), and family health. Explores the roles of neighborhood and community context, policy, and other social factors in substance use and effects on families. Students apply course concepts and information to develop materials for community outreach and education about substance use and family health. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: HDFS 105 or 120 and HDFS 290, or their social science equivalent. Junior standing or higher.

HDFS 450   Practicum in HDFS   credit: 1 to 12 Hours.

Supervised on- or off-campus learning experience related to human development or family studies, supervised in cooperation with an appropriate agency or institution. Not available to students on probation. 1 to 12 undergraduate hours. 1 to 12 graduate hours. May be repeated for up to 12 hours in separate semesters. Only 6 hours of the course may be applied to the total required for a graduate or undergraduate degree in Human Development and Family Studies. Prerequisite: Human Development and Family Studies major; junior standing.

HDFS 494   Applied Research Methods   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Participation in faculty-supervised research as a member of a transdisiplinary team investigating questions related to the health and well-being of children and families. Students propose their own research questions and present findings developed from data gathered by the team. 1 to 4 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours in the same term or to a maximum of 12 hours in separate terms. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

HDFS 499   Seminar   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Special topics in human development, family studies, or community development. 1 to 4 undergraduate hours. 1 to 4 graduate hours. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 12 hours.

HDFS 500   Professional Development   credit: 1 Hour.

Overview of issues in professional development in the field of human development and family studies; focuses on both academic and applied career paths. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated to a maximum of 4 hours.

HDFS 501   Human Development Theories   credit: 4 Hours.

Overview of basic theories and theoretical perspectives on human development; focuses on major concepts, issues, and questions in the field. Same as RST 581. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit.

HDFS 503   Social-Emotional Development   credit: 2 Hours.

Theory and research related to social and emotional development from infancy through middle childhood. Key topics include emotional regulation and social-emotional understanding, with special attention to the interpersonal contexts of social-emotional development, including parent-child, sibling and peer relationships. Prerequisite: HDFS 501.

HDFS 505   Advanced Adolescence   credit: 2 Hours.

Advanced interdisciplinary examination of current research on adolescence as a life course stage and developmental period; focuses on principal contexts of adolescents¿ lives, such as family, peers and school, and examines how experience in these contexts relates to preparation for adulthood. Designed for students with prior course work on adolescence or related topics who plan to do research, teaching, or policy work pertinent to this age period. Prerequisite: Prior course work in human development, developmental psychology or life course sociology.

HDFS 521   Family Theories   credit: 4 Hours.

Contemporary family theories and their application in family research.

HDFS 523   Ethnic Families   credit: 4 Hours.

Historical, social, economic, contextual (neighborhood), and subcultural factors that influence the organization and dynamics of ethnic-racial family life in the United States: family and group immigration and migration histories, acculturation, identity development, family organization, gender roles, parent-child relations, family rituals, neighborhood influences on family life and child-adolescent development, and the relationship between social class and ethnicity-race. Particular emphasis is given to qualitative studies that detail the first-hand experiences of families.

HDFS 526   Intimate Partner Violence   credit: 2 Hours.

Extent, nature, causes, and consequences of intimate partner violence in the United States. Examines the complexities of intimate partner violence, including individual, societal, and historical factors that contribute to violence, the implications of making distinctions in types of violence and perpetrators, and the relationship between institutional responses and individual decision-making. Also examines theoretical methodological and ethical issues related to violence research.

HDFS 527   Family Resiliency   credit: 4 Hours.

Examines complex factors, including culture, economy, and values conflicts, that challenge families and the range of adaptive strategies that families deploy amid various challenges and stressors. Activities include developing a research or action proposal related to developing family resiliency. Credit is not given for both HDFS 527 and HDFS 427. Prerequisite: HDFS 521 or HDFS 525 or equivalent.

HDFS 528   Parenting   credit: 2 Hours.

Explores how parenthood has been conceptualized and investigated in human development, family studies, and related disciplines. Major theoretical perspectives and emerging line of research will be reviewed including parental style, beliefs and cognition, identity, fathering and diverse parenting contexts. Prerequisite: HDFS 501 or HDFS 521.

HDFS 533   Community In American Society   credit: 4 Hours.

Classic U. S. community studies are paired with current journal articles to examine how people in rural, suburban, and urban places go about making, maintaining or losing "community" in the context of societal change. The community studies provide a window on change at the local level including: urbanization, suburbanization, ethnic group interactions, inner-city poverty concentration, household structure variation, economic restructuring, and environmental impacts. Community studies are also critically evaluated both theoretically and as a research strategy. Same as RST 582, SOC 572, and UP 533. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit.

HDFS 534   Neighborhoods and Human Dev   credit: 4 Hours.

Theories, methodological issues, and current empirical research on the impact of neighborhoods on human development and family welfare across the life course including how neighborhoods characteristics, e.g., poverty, racial and ethnic composition, and geographic space, influence child and adolescent development, health, and employment opportunities and success in adulthood. Key mechanisms include: family conditions, local environment, social networks, and spatial mismatch. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit.

HDFS 540   Gender & Sexuality   credit: 2 Hours.

Highlights key approaches to gender and sexuality within the multidisciplinary field of family studies; examines how gender and sexuality organize the accomplishment of family life through both social structure and social performance, and their attendant historical, economic and political contexts.

HDFS 550   Advanced Practicum in HDFS   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Practicum providing graduate students with supervised experience in the design, implementation, and/or evaluation of outreach programs, policy development, or consultation models designed to meet the needs of children, families and/or communities. 1 to 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Prerequisite: HDFS 450.

HDFS 561   Child and Family Program Dev   credit: 4 Hours.

Theoretical and practical aspects of planned efforts to influence the development of children, youth, and families in the context of communities, particularly efforts to promote competence and well-being of children and youth, positive parenting, and well-being and adjustment of adults. Examines literature from four approaches: family life education, youth development, prevention/applied developmental science, as well as health promotion and community health.

HDFS 562   Child & Family Program Eval   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduces practical skills for evaluating service, intervention, and educational programs, including needs assessment, program monitoring and impact assessment, with emphasis on outcome measure selection, randomized and quasi-experimental designs, statistical power analysis, and ethical issues.

HDFS 580   Survey Research Methodology Fundamentals: Study Design and Instrument Development   credit: 4 Hours.

Leads students to understand best practices related to survey research methodology, including study design and instrument development. It provides a foundation in survey methods to inform future survey work. During this course, students will design a survey study. We will cover the significant decisions and alternatives considered by a researcher who wants to design and implement a survey that accurately represents a particular population's characteristics and behavior. Topics common to surveys include sample design, respondent recruitment, response rates, data collection methods (in-person or telephone interviews, computer-assisted interviews, or mail surveys), instrument construction, and potential sources (respondent and interviewer) of bias. Reaching hard-to-reach populations will be considered throughout. For this course, working knowledge of research methods (e.g., introductory research methods graduate-level course) is essential, as is the ability to analyze existing research studies critically. The methods, strategies, and techniques learned in this course will apply to many disciplines (e.g., HDFS, public health, social work, education, business, social and human sciences) and provide a broad base of knowledge to grow through more advanced coursework and internships. 4 graduate hours. 4 professional hours. Prerequisite: One previous course in graduate level research methods.

HDFS 581   Participatory Research Methods: An Introduction to Frameworks and Applications   credit: 4 Hours.

Students in this course will review theoretical frameworks, principles, methodological approaches, and best practices of community-based participatory research. The methods, strategies, and techniques learned in this course will apply to social and human science disciplines (e.g., HDFS, public health, social work, education, sociology, psychology, business). The course will cover the major decisions and alternatives considered by a researcher who wants to engage community members in participatory research projects. Hard-to-reach populations will be considered throughout. Master's and doctoral level students may enroll, but should have taken at least one graduate level research methods course prior to this one. 4 graduate hours. 4 professional hours. Prerequisite: One previous graduate level research methods course.

HDFS 582   Discourse Analysis in the Social Sciences   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduces social scientific approaches to discourse analysis and provides training on conducting a qualitative discourse analysis of publicly-available textual data. We explore common theoretical approaches to discourse analysis and develop hands-on skills related to study design, and collecting, coding, and analyzing textual data. We focus mainly on discourses as "macro"-level institutionally embedded patterns of meaning in society, rather than "micro"-level language patterns in interactions, while recognizing their co-occurrence and situating them alongside one another. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Prerequisite: HDFS 590 or equivalent.

HDFS 590   Advanced Research Methods   credit: 4 Hours.

Overview of positivist, interpretive, and critical research paradigms and their quantitative and qualitative methodologies; critical evaluation of current social science literature; students develop their own research proposals. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit.

HDFS 591   Qualitative Methods   credit: 4 Hours.

Qualitative methods in the social sciences: epistemological context; data collection and relationships with participants; data management, analysis and evaluation; writing strategies. Specific content emphasis alternates annually between field research and grounded theory. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours.

HDFS 594   Intermed Statistical Analysis   credit: 4 Hours.

Overview of common quantitative research methods and statistical analyses used in human development, family, and community research; covers sampling, data management, bivariate analyses, multivariate regression. Students frame a research question and use a common data set and statistical analysis software to prepare methods and results sections of a manuscript suitable for publication. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Prerequisite: HDFS 590 or equivalent.

HDFS 595   Seminar   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Discussion and evaluation of current literature on selected topics in human and community development. 1 to 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. May be repeated in the same or subsequent terms.

HDFS 596   Advanced Studies in HDFS   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Library or experimental research on specific problems of limited scope. May be taken in addition to 32 hours required for a master's degree by students who do not write a thesis. For non-thesis students only. May be repeated to a maximum of 4 hours.

HDFS 597   Advanced Statistical Analysis   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduction to the conceptual bases and uses of advanced statistical techniques in human development and family research, including factor analysis, cluster analysis, multilevel modeling, and logistic regression. Special attention given to the longitudinal and dyadic analyses and to techniques for handling missing data. Students use common statistical packages and their own data set to produce a journal-style manuscript. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Credit is not given for both HDFS 592 and HDFS 597. Prerequisite: HDFS 594 or a graduate-level course in multivariate statistical analysis.

HDFS 598   Special Problems in HDFS   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Research or independent study on a special problem that is not part of thesis work. 1 to 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. May be repeated in the same or separate terms to a maximum of 8 hours.

HDFS 599   Thesis Research   credit: 0 to 16 Hours.

Individual thesis research under supervision of faculty in specialized fields of human and community development. 0 to 16 graduate hours. No professional credit. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated.