Materials Science and Engineering

David G. Cahill
201 Materials Science and Engineering Building, 1304 West Green, Urbana
PH: (217) 333-1441
FX: (217) 333-2736
http://matse.illinois.edu

Curriculum in Materials Science and Engineering

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Materials Science and Engineering

Materials science and engineering is the basis for all engineering. Improvements in the quality of life require knowledge of the processing and properties of current materials and the design, development and application of new materials. The Materials Science and Engineering (MatSE) curriculum provides an understanding of the underlying principles of synthesis and processing of materials and of the interrelationships between structure, properties, and processing. Students learn how to create advanced materials and systems required, e.g., for flexible electronic displays and photonics that will change communications technologies, for site specific drug delivery, for self-healing materials, for enabling the transition to a hydrogen-based economy, and for more efficient photovoltaics and nuclear systems for energy production. The curriculum uses concepts from both basic physics and chemistry and provides a detailed knowledge of what makes the materials we use every day behave as they do.

Students in the first two years take courses in general areas of science and engineering as well as courses introducing the concepts in MatSE. In the third year, students study the common, central issues related to MatSE. In the senior year, students focus on an area of MatSE of their greatest interest, providing them with the detailed knowledge to be immediately useful to corporations, become entrepreneuers, or to provide the underpinning knowledge for graduate study. Note: students interested in biomaterials take a specific set of courses to provide them with a background in biology and chemistry while maintaining a strong engineering focus.

A combined B.S.-M.S. Materials Science and Engineering degree program is available. Its admission and course requirements are described in the College of Engineering program information section and the department's website.

Focus Areas 

The MatSE program provides a diverse set of courses enabling a plan of study designed around the interest of the student. The plan of study includes the core areas of materials science (ceramics, metals, polymers, electronic materials, and biomaterials), as well as emerging interdisciplinary topics (e.g., materials for energy, advanced processing and/or characterization methods, materials theory and computation). The biomaterials area requires a unique set of prerequisites and courses, and so has a distinct curriculum. Students are encouraged to take engineering, science, and business electives of interest to them and of relevance to their career goals. Highlights of the possible focus areas are:

  • Advanced Processing and Characterization Methods: Introduces principles for designing and engineering materials structure, properties, and chemistry from atomic to macroscopic scales, This area also teaches fundamental and practical concepts necessary for determining materials structure and chemistry at different length scales. This area utilizes basic knowledge from physics and chemistry.
  • Biomaterials: The science and engineering of materials for use in biological applications, particularly as related to human health. This area includes concepts in basic and intermediate chemistry and and basic and intermediate biology, with relatively less coverage of physics topics. It includes a subset of the standard junior year courses and requires additional chemistry and biology in the junior year.
  • Composites: Studies the science and engineering of materials formed by comb8ining multiple materials into a single material. Studies of composites make significant use of properties of materials and mathematical knowledge.
  • Ceramics: Studies the science and engineering of ceramic materials, including alloy design, composites, synthesis, and processing methods. Ceramics makes significant use of concepts from both basic physics and basic chemistry.
  • Electronic Materials: Describes the design and engineering of materials primarily for the microelectronics industries. Topics span the ceramics, metals, and polymers areas. Concepts from basic and intermediate physics are used along with basic chemistry.
  • Metals: Introduces the design and processing of metals and alloys to achieve desired properties. This area primarily uses concepts from basic and intermediate physics with relatively less emphasis on chemical concepts.
  • Polymers: Teaches the methods for molecular design to achieve desired properties in individual polymers, polymer blends, and polymer composites as well as processing methods. This area primarily uses concepts from basic and intermediate chemistry with relatively less emphasis on physics concepts.
  • Materials for Energy and the Environment: Studies materials for energy production, harvesting, and storage; materials for environmental remediation, water purification, and recycling; and includes discussions on sustainability and life-cycle analysis of the environmental impact of materials. Materials issues related to both renewable and non-renewable energy production are covered. This area utilizes concepts from both physics and chemistry.
  • Materials Theory and Computation: Introduces computational modeling approaches for materials that span length- and time-scales from the atomic to the macroscopic. This area focuses on computational prediction of material response to different stimuli (mechanical loads, temperature, electronic excitations, etc.) and fundamental material properties.

Overview of Curricular Requirements

The curriculum requires 128 hours for graduation and is organized as follows.

Orientation and Professional Development

These courses introduce the opportunities and resources your college, department, and curriculum can offer you as you work to achieve your career goals. They also provide the skills to work effectively and successfully in the engineering profession.

ENG 100Engineering Orientation 10
MSE 183Freshman Materials Laboratory 1,21
Total Hours1
1

External transfer students take ENG 300 instead.

2

This optional course is highly recommended for freshmen and may be used to help meet free elective requirements.

Foundational Mathematics and Science

These courses stress the basic mathematical and scientific principles upon which this engineering discipline is based.

CHEM 102General Chemistry I3
CHEM 103General Chemistry Lab I1
CHEM 104General Chemistry II3
CHEM 105General Chemistry Lab II1
MATH 221Calculus I 14
MATH 225Introductory Matrix Theory2
MATH 231Calculus II3
MATH 241Calculus III4
MATH 285Intro Differential Equations3
PHYS 211University Physics: Mechanics4
PHYS 212University Physics: Elec & Mag4
PHYS 214Univ Physics: Quantum Physics2
Total Hours34
1

MATH 220 may be substituted, with four of the five credit hours applying toward the degree. MATH 220 is appropriate for students with no background in calculus.

Materials Science and Engineering Technical Core

These courses stress fundamental concepts and basic laboratory techniques that comprise the common intellectual understanding of materials science and engineering.

For All Students

CS 101Intro Computing: Engrg & Sci3
ECE 205Elec & Electronic Circuits3
IE 300Analysis of Data 13
or STAT 400 Statistics and Probability I
MSE 182Introduction to MatSE2
MSE 201Phases and Phase Relations3
MSE 206Mechanics for MatSE4
MSE 307Materials Laboratory I3
MSE 308Materials Laboratory II3
MSE 395Materials Design3
MSE 401Thermodynamics of Materials3
MSE 402Kinetic Processes in Materials3
MSE 406Thermal-Mech Behavior of Matls3
Total Hours36
1

The replacement of IE 300 with STAT 400 is not allowed for students in the Biomaterials Area unless one of their area or technical electives is deemed by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) to be an engineering course. The extra hour of credit for STAT 400 may be used to help meet free elective requirements.

For the Biomaterials Area

CHEM 232Elementary Organic Chemistry I0 TO 4
MCB 150Molec & Cellular Basis of Life4
MCB 450Introductory Biochemistry3
MCB 252Cells, Tissues & Development3
Subtotal13
Total for the Biomaterials Area49

For All Other Areas

MSE 304Electronic Properties of Matls3
MSE 405Microstructure Determination3
Subtotal6
Total for all non-Biomaterials Students42

Technical Electives

These courses stress the rigorous analysis and design principles practiced in the major subdisciplines of materials science and engineering embodied in the MatSE focus areas.

For the Biomaterials Area

Biomaterials area topical lectures selected from the list of topical lectures established by the department. 15
MSE 404Laboratory Studies in Materials Science and Engineering3
MSE 470Design and Use of Biomaterials3
Topical lectures outside the biomaterials area. 6
Total Hours17
1

Topical Lectures.

For All Other Areas

Topical lectures selected from the list of courses established by the department. No more than 6 hours may be from introductory topical lectures. 112
MSE 404Laboratory Studies in Materials Science and Engineering6
Technical electives selected from the list of approved courses established by the department. 26
Total Hours24
1

Topical Lectures.

2

List of approved technical electives.

Liberal Education

The liberal education courses develop students' understanding of human culture and society, build skills of inquiry and critical thinking, and lay a foundation for civic engagement and lifelong learning.

Electives from the campus General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences list. 6
Electives from the campus General Education Humanities and the Arts list.6
Electives either from a list approved by the college, or additional courses from the campus General Education lists for Social and Behavioral Sciences or Humanities and the Arts.6
Total Hours18

Students must also complete the campus cultural studies requirement by completing (i) one western/comparative culture(s) course and (ii) one non-western/U.S. minority culture(s) course from the General Education cultural studies lists. Most students select liberal education courses that simultaneously satisfy two or more cultural studies requirements. Courses from the western and non-western lists that fall into free electives or other categories may also be used satisfy the cultural studies requirements.

Composition

These courses teach fundamentals of expository writing.

RHET 105Writing and Research4
Advanced Composition (satisfied by completing the sequence MSE 307 + MSE 308 in the Materials Science and Engineering Technical Core)
Total Hours4

Free Electives

These unrestricted electives, subject to certain exceptions as noted at the College of Engineering Advising Website, give the student the opportunity to explore any intellectual area of unique interest. This freedom plays a critical role in helping students to define research specialties or to complete minors.

Free electives. Additional unrestricted course work, subject to certain exceptions as noted at the College of Engineering advising Web site, so that there are at least 128 credit hours earned toward the degree. 16
1

College of Engineering Advising Website

Topical Lecture Courses

The courses listed below have been approved by the department as topical lectures for all focus areas.

Biomaterials Area
MSE 470Design and Use of Biomaterials3
Topical Lectures 15
All Other Areas
MSE 420Ceramic Materials & Properties3
MSE 421Ceramic Processing3
MSE 422Electrical Ceramics3
MSE 423Ceramic Processing Laboratory3
ECE 340Semiconductor Electronics3
MSE 460Electronic Materials I3
MSE 461Electronic Materials II3
MSE 440Mechanical Behavior of Metals3
MSE 441Metals Processing3
MSE 442Metals Laboratory3
MSE 443Design of Engineering Alloys3
MSE 450Polymer Science & Engineering3
MSE 452Polymer Laboratory3
MSE 453Plastics Engineering3
Area technical electives 13-6
1

Selected from the departmental list of approved area technical electives for focus areas.

Suggested Sequence

The schedule that follows is illustrative, showing the typical sequence in which courses would be taken by a student with no college course credit already earned and who intends to graduate in four years.  Each individual's case may vary, but the position of required named courses is generally indicative of the order in which they should be taken. The first two years of the Suggested Sequence is the same for all MatSE students. The third and fourth years vary with the Focus Area chosen. Refer to the appropriate third and fourth year sequence.

First Year
First SemesterHours
CHEM 102General Chemistry I3
CHEM 103General Chemistry Lab I1
ENG 100Engineering Orientation0
MATH 221Calculus I4
MSE 182Introduction to MatSE2
RHET 105 (or Liberal education elective)2,3Writing and Research4
 Semester Hours14
Second Semester
CHEM 104General Chemistry II3
CHEM 105General Chemistry Lab II1
MATH 225Introductory Matrix Theory2
MATH 231Calculus II3
MSE 1834Freshman Materials Laboratory1
PHYS 211University Physics: Mechanics4
RHET 105 (or Liberal education elective)2,3Writing and Research4
 Semester Hours17
Second Year
First Semester
CS 101Intro Computing: Engrg Sci3
MATH 241Calculus III4
MSE 201Phases and Phase Relations3
PHYS 212University Physics: Elec Mag4
Liberal education elective33
 Semester Hours17
Second Semester
ECE 205Elec Electronic Circuits3
MATH 285Intro Differential Equations3
MSE 206Mechanics for MatSE4
PHYS 214Univ Physics: Quantum Physics2
Liberal education elective33
 Semester Hours15
 Total Hours: 63

All students except Biomaterials Area

Third Year
First SemesterHours
IE 300 or STAT 4005Analysis of Data3
MSE 3076Materials Laboratory I3
MSE 401Thermodynamics of Materials3
MSE 406Thermal-Mech Behavior of Matls3
Liberal education elective33
 Semester Hours15
Second Semester
MSE 304Electronic Properties of Matls3
MSE 3086Materials Laboratory II3
MSE 402Kinetic Processes in Materials3
MSE 405Microstructure Determination3
Topical Lecture (Intro Level Suggested)3
Liberal education elective13
 Semester Hours18
Fourth Year
First Semester
Topical lecture courses7,86
MSE 404Laboratory Studies in Materials Science and Engineering3
Technical elective93
Liberal education elective33
Free elective3
 Semester Hours18
Second Semester
MSE 395Materials Design3
MSE 404Laboratory Studies in Materials Science and Engineering3
Topical Lecture3
Technical elective93
Free elective3
 Semester Hours15
 Total Hours: 66

Biomaterials Area

Third Year
First SemesterHours
CHEM 232Elementary Organic Chemistry I3
MSE 3076Materials Laboratory I3
MSE 401Thermodynamics of Materials3
MSE 406Thermal-Mech Behavior of Matls3
MCB 150Molec Cellular Basis of Life4
 Semester Hours16
Second Semester
MCB 252Cells, Tissues Development3
IE 300 or STAT 4005Analysis of Data3
MSE 3086Materials Laboratory II3
MSE 402Kinetic Processes in Materials3
Liberal education elective33
 Semester Hours15
Fourth Year
First Semester
MSE 470Design and Use of Biomaterials3
MCB 450Introductory Biochemistry3
Topical lecture in biomaterials area2
Topical lecture outside of biomaterials area3
Liberal education elective33
Free Elective 3
 Semester Hours17
Second Semester
MSE 395Materials Design3
MSE 404Laboratory Studies in Materials Science and Engineering1.5
Topical lecture in biomaterials area3
Topical lecture outside of biomaterials area3
Liberal education elective33
Free elective 3
 Semester Hours16.5
 Total Hours: 64.5
1

MATH 220 may be substituted, with four of the five credit hours applying toward the degree. MATH 220 is appropriate for students with no background in calculus.

2

RHET 105 may be taken in the first or second semester as authorized. The alternative is a social sciences or humanities elective.

3

Liberal education electives must include 6 hours of social & behavioral sciences and 6 hours of humanities & the arts course work from the campus General Education lists. The remaining 6 hours may be selected from a list maintained by the college, or additional course work from the campus General Education lists for social & behavioral sciences or humanities & the arts. Students must also complete the campus cultural studies requirement by completing (i) one western/comparative culture(s) course and (ii) one non-western/U.S. minority culture(s) course from the General Education cultural studies lists. Most students select liberal education courses that simultaneously satisfy these cultural studies requirements. Courses from the western and non-western lists that fall into free electives or other categories may also be used satisfy the cultural studies requirements.

4

This course is highly recommended for freshmen, who may use it to help meet free elective requirements.

5

Satisfies the General Education Advanced Composition requirement.

6

The replacement of IE 300 with STAT 400 is not allowed for students in the Biomaterials Area unless one of their area or technical electives is deemed by ABET to be an engineering course. The extra hour of credit for this course may be used to help meet free elective requirements.

7

To be selected from list of area specialty course established by the department to provide an acceptable level of study in the student's chosen focus area.

8

During fourth year, strongly recommended is incorporation of one or more of an internship, co-op position, and a research project during summers or an academic semester, or both. For students who intend to continue in graduate school, recommended additionally is the undertaking of a research project (Senior Thesis) in the senior year. The project may take the place of 4-6 hours of free, technical, or area specialty electives.

9

Selected from the departmental list of approved technical electives

MSE Class Schedule

Courses

MSE 101   Materials in Today's World   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to the field of materials science. Examination and demonstration of materials and their properties in the context of their use in everyday objects. Survey of the role materials have played and will continue to play in shaping society. Intended for non-engineering majors. Technical elective credit is not given to College of Engineering majors.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Nat Sci & Tech - Phys Sciences

MSE 182   Introduction to MatSE   credit: 2 Hours.

Overview of MatSE as a basis for understanding how structure, property, and processing relationships are developed and used for different types of materials. Case studies of advances in new materials and processes illustrating the role of materials in modern society. Laboratory-discussion demonstrations and experiments. Design-team analysis or synthesis of objects that use materials creatively.

MSE 183   Freshman Materials Laboratory   credit: 1 Hour.

Team-based laboratory developing concepts introduced in MSE 182. Practical descriptions of materials concepts, literature research, experimental design, concept validation, teamwork, and presentation of results. Prerequisite: MSE 182.

MSE 199   Undergraduate Open Seminar   credit: 1 to 5 Hours.

May be repeated to a maximum of 5 hours. May be repeated in the same term.

MSE 201   Phases and Phase Relations   credit: 3 Hours.

Understanding microstructure. Quantitative examination of phases (crystalline and non-crystalline structures) and the relationships between phases (phase diagrams). Commercial practices for producing desired microscopic phase configurations and macroscopic shapes (processing). Credit is not given for both MSE 201 and MSE 280. Prerequisite: MSE 182; credit or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 104, MATH 231 and PHYS 211.

MSE 206   Mechanics for MatSE   credit: 4 Hours.

Statics, mechanics of materials, and fluid mechanics concepts pertinent to the fields of materials science and engineering: force resultants; stresses and strains produced in elastic bodies; microscopic effects of different loading states (tension, compression, torsion, and bending) on deformable bodies; beam stresses and deflections; three-dimensional stresses and strains; stress and strain-rate relationships for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids; conservation equations (control volume analysis) for fluid flow; Reynolds number; slow inertial and turbulent flows. Credit is not given for both MSE 206 and either TAM 251 or TAM 335. Prerequisite: MATH 225, MATH 241 and PHYS 211; credit or concurrent enrollment in CS 101 and MSE 201.

MSE 280   Engineering Materials   credit: 3 Hours.

Materials science and engineering of ceramics, electronic materials, metals and polymers. Bonding; crystallography; imperfections; processing and properties of semiconductors, polymers, metals, ceramics and composites; phase diagrams. Case studies. Credit is not given for both MSE 280 and any of CEE 300, ME 330, MSE 201. Prerequisite: CHEM 102 and PHYS 211.

MSE 304   Electronic Properties of Matls   credit: 3 Hours.

Electronic structure and bonding of materials, electrical conduction in metals and semiconductors, and dielectric and magnetic properties of solids. Credit is not given for both MSE 304 and PHYS 460. Prerequisite: PHYS 214.

MSE 307   Materials Laboratory I   credit: 3 Hours.

Experiments using optical and scanning electron microscopy and various thermal and thermodynamic measuring techniques. Familiarization with laboratory test instruments. MSE 307 and MSE 308 are approved for General Education credit only as a sequence. Both courses must be completed to receive Advanced Composition credit. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent registration in MSE 401 and either MSE 201 or MSE 280.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Advanced Composition

MSE 308   Materials Laboratory II   credit: 3 Hours.

Experiments characterizing mechanical, transport, and magnetic-electric properties of materials and the use optical and scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. MSE 307 and MSE 308 are approved for General Education credit only as a sequence. Both courses must be completed to receive Advanced Composition credit. Prerequisite: MSE 307; credit or concurrent registration in MSE 304 and MSE 405.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Advanced Composition

MSE 395   Materials Design   credit: 3 Hours.

Design of various engineering devices, objects, or systems. Team-based and faculty-guided projects directed toward the development of materials-based solutions to problems originating from student, faculty, and industrial suggestions. Solutions are based on the knowledge, skills, and design experience acquired in earlier course work and incorporate engineering standards and realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, sustainability, manufacturability, ethical, health and safety, social, and political concerns. Prerequisite: This course is available to engineering majors with senior standing only.

MSE 396   Introduction to Research   credit: 1 to 3 Hours.

Fundamental tenets of research including an introduction to laboratory safety, constructing a hypothesis, and the design of experiments to test the hypothesis. Basics of mathematical modeling and statistical analysis of data, including the analysis of research data. Emphasis on exposure to the basic procedures comprising engineering communication and the importance of verbal and written communication. Approved for Letter and S/U grading. May be repeated in separate terms.

MSE 397   Independent Study   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Individual study of any topic in materials science and engineering selected by the student and conducted under the supervision of a member of the faculty. May be repeated to a maximum of 4 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MSE 398   Special Topics   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Subject offerings of new and developing areas of knowledge in materials science and engineering intended to augment the existing curriculum. See Class Schedule or departmental course information for topics and prerequisites. May be repeated in the same or separate terms if topics vary.

MSE 401   Thermodynamics of Materials   credit: 3 Hours.

Basic thermodynamic principles including energy, entropy, and free energy; macroscopic properties of hard and soft materials systems, such as equilibrium states, phases, and phase transitions. Application of phase diagrams. Statistical interpretation of thermodynamics on the atomistic level. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Credit is not given for both MSE 401 and CHEM 444 or PHYS 427. Prerequisite: MSE 201 or MSE 280; credit or concurrent registration in MATH 285.

MSE 402   Kinetic Processes in Materials   credit: 3 Hours.

Kinetics of chemical reactions; rate equations, reaction mechanisms; transport processes; diffusion equations, atomic and molecular diffusion; phase transformations; nucleation, crystallization, displacive, spinodal decomposition; surface and interface phenomena; sintering, grain growth, recovery, and recystallization. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 201 and MSE 401.

MSE 403   Synthesis of Materials   credit: 3 Hours.

Fundamentals of the synthesis of materials. Principles of synthesis; processes, approaches, synthetic methodology and probes; methodologies in materials synthesis; polymerization, sol-gel processes, liquid and vapor phase synthesis, materials coupling reactions, and precursor-derived, radiation-induced and asymmetric synthesis. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 201; credit or concurrent registration in MSE 401.

MSE 404   Laboratory Studies in Materials Science and Engineering   credit: 1.5 Hours.

Experiments include direct hands-on investigations or are performed through computational approaches. Laboratory experiences include both fundamental studies as well as investigations on more applied topics. 1.5 undergraduate hours. 1.5 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Prerequisite: MSE 307 and MSE 308 or permission of instructor. Senior standing.

MSE 405   Microstructure Determination   credit: 3 Hours.

Fundamentals and applications of various forms of microscopy and diffraction for characterization of physical microstructure of materials and of various forms of spectroscopy for characterization of chemical microstructure. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 214, CHEM 104, MSE 201, and MSE 307.

MSE 406   Thermal-Mech Behavior of Matls   credit: 3 Hours.

Fundamentals of elastic, viscoelastic and plastic deformation of materials, elementary theory of statics and dynamics of dislocations; strengthening mechanisms; behavior of composites; fracture and fatigue behavior; fundamentals of thermal behavior: heat capacity, thermal expansion and conductivity; effects of thermal stress. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Credit is not given for both MSE 406 and either ME 430 or TAM 424. Prerequisite: MSE 206; credit or concurrent registration in MSE 401.

MSE 420   Ceramic Materials & Properties   credit: 3 Hours.

Ceramic material fundamentals, emphasizing structure-property relations. Development, use, and control of the properties of a wide variety of ceramic materials from a physico-chemical point of view. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours.

MSE 421   Ceramic Processing   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Microstructure development and processing of ceramic materials, with an emphasis on structure-property-processing relationships. Processing methodologies and their effects on microstructural development. Illustration and examination of several ceramic components within this context. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 420.

MSE 422   Electrical Ceramics   credit: 3 Hours.

Electrical ceramics, from insulators to conductors, and magnetic and optical materials; the role of the processing cycle and microstructure development on the design and performance of electrical components; capacitors, resistors, and inductors; structure-property relations for pyro-, piezo-, and ferroelectric materials; perovskite and spinel based structures; varistors, thermistors, transducers, actuators, memory elements, multilayered components, and their applications. Design project. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 420.

MSE 423   Ceramic Processing Laboratory   credit: 3 Hours.

Experiments and demonstrations involving a wide range of modern ceramic processing methods will be conducted to develop fundamental understanding of the relationships between raw materials, processing methods, microstructural development, and physical properties. Lab emphasis on the underlying physics and chemistry of processing and design of processing routes to achieve desired material properties. Technical reports. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 421.

MSE 440   Mechanical Behavior of Metals   credit: 3 Hours.

Mechanical behavior of solids: crystal plasticity, dislocations, point defects and grain boundaries, creep and fatigue behavior, and fracture. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 406.

MSE 441   Metals Processing   credit: 3 Hours.

Melt, mechanical, thermal, powder, and surface processing of metals. Extraction of metals, joining of metals, metal composites, and metal recycling. Relationships between the processing of metals, the microstructures that are produced, and the behavior of metal components. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 406.

MSE 442   Metals Laboratory   credit: 3 Hours.

Advanced metallurgy laboratory. Effects of heat treatment; mechanical testing; oxidation and corrosion; metallography of selected alloys. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 308, MSE 440, and MSE 441.

MSE 443   Design of Engineering Alloys   credit: 3 Hours.

Application of science and engineering principles to the design, selection, and performance of engineering alloys. Alloy classes, design, effect of alloying elements, relation to processing variables, and structure-property relationships; design project. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 401 and MSE 402.

MSE 445   Corrosion of Metals   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Electrochemistry, thermodynamics, and kinetics of corrosion; behavior of ferrous and nonferrous metals; corrosion rates; corrosion control; cathodic and anodic protection; high-temperature corrosion; corrosion testing; electrolytic machining methods. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours.

MSE 450   Polymer Science & Engineering   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Polymer solution properties, conformation, and molecular weight characterization. Rheological and viscoelastic behavior: relaxations and transitions, rubber elasticity. Crystallinity, morphology, and deformation of crystalline polymers. Blends and composites. Methods of fabrication. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours.

MSE 452   Polymer Laboratory   credit: 3 Hours.

Experimental investigations of polymer synthesis, characterization (molecular, thermal, structural and electronic), processing and device fabrication. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 450.

MSE 453   Plastics Engineering   credit: 3 Hours.

Engineering characteristics of plastics; viscoelasticity, viscosity, yield, and fracture; reinforced polymers; processing; environmental considerations; applicability of technical data sheets; design (project); current advances. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 450.

MSE 455   Macromolecular Solids   credit: 3 Hours.

Mechanical behavior of amorphous and semi-crystalline polymers; overview of polymer structure and characterization; polymer morphology; orientation effects, rubber elasticity, polymer linear viscoelasticity using Boltzmann superposition and mechanical models; measurement of viscoelastic properties; relaxation and transitions; polymeric yield phenomena and plastic flow; deformation mechanisms; fracture and craze formation; impact and fatigue. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 450.

MSE 456   Mechanics of Composites   credit: 3 Hours.

Behavior of composite materials and their use in engineering structures: behavior and properties of the constituent fibers and matrices, micromechanical predictions of composite properties, anisotropic elasticity, behavior of composite laminae, and classical lamination theory; fracture mechanisms, failure theories; behavior of composite plates and beams. Same as AE 428 and TAM 428. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: AE 321, CEE 300, ME 330, or MSE 406.

MSE 457   Polymer Chemistry   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Methods used to make polymers including reaction mechanisms, kinetics, and analytical techniques. Emphasis on understanding how macromolecule structure, composition, and properties are controlled through a variety of synthetic approaches. Same as CHEM 480. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours.

MSE 458   Polymer Physics   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Physics of polymer systems. Equilibrium conformation, structure, properties and phase transitions of polymer solutions, dense melts, liquid crystals, mixtures, block copolymers, surfaces and interfaces, gels and rubbers, biopolymers, and electronic polymers. Same as CHEM 482. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 401.

MSE 460   Electronic Materials I   credit: 3 Hours.

Materials science, engineering, and processing of semiconductors. Semiconductor structure and chemistry relationships to electronic and optical properties. Control of processing to achieve desired properties; design and production of novel materials. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ECE 340; MSE 304 or PHYS 460.

MSE 461   Electronic Materials II   credit: 3 Hours.

Materials science, engineering, and processing of microlithographic materials, conductors, and dielectrics for electronic applications. Performance related to materials properties and processing. Processing commonly used in microelectronic circuit manufacture for metallization, dielectric formation, and lithography. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ECE 340.

MSE 462   Electronic Materials Lab   credit: 3 Hours.

Fabrication, analysis, and properties of thin film materials. Principles and practice of (i) deposition of thin film materials by vacuum evaporation, sputtering and plasma assisted processes; (ii) modification of properties by thermal reaction, surface treatment, etc.; (iii) characterization of key properties including electrical conductivity, optical properties, and stress. Methods to optimize the film microstructure and engineering properties via growth techniques. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ECE 340.

MSE 466   Materials in Electrochem Syst   credit: 3 Hours.

Materials issues in electrochemical systems including fundamental thermodynamics, kinetics and electrode processes in electrochemical systems and materials specific issues in the materials design, materials in energy storage and conversion systems, and electrochemical corrosion. Emphasis placed on issues of materials selection, microstructure, systems design, materials limitations, and data analysis. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Credit is not given for both MSE 466 and CHEM 524.

MSE 470   Design and Use of Biomaterials   credit: 3 Hours.

Characterization and use of biomaterials in medical applications. Concepts of biocompatibility in terms of structure and properties of materials and interactions between materials and proteins, cells, and tissue. Issues related to the design of biomaterials. Design of biomaterials to meet specific medical needs. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent registration in both MCB 252 and either CHEM 232 or MSE 403.

MSE 472   Biomaterials Laboratory   credit: 3 Hours.

Experiments involving the chemistry and physics of biomaterials, biocompatibility of materials, tissue regeneration, rheology of biomaterials and tissues, structural studies of biomaterials, and controlled release of small molecules and drugs. Laboratory techniques for protein purification, cytotoxicity testing, tissue culture, mechanical testing, microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Same as BIOE 473. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 470.

MSE 473   Biomolecular Materials Science   credit: 3 Hours.

Fundamental and unifying principles in biomolecular materials science. Nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and sugars. Specific and non-specific interactions which govern biomolecular behavior in a wide range of contexts (e.g., self-assembly, cell adhesion). Present knowledge and empirical evidence integrated with discussions of experimental characterization and manipulation techniques in biotechnology. Application of course content and expository research into current literature via a case study term project. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours.

MSE 474   Biomaterials and Nanomedicine   credit: 3 Hours.

Design and synthesis of polymeric biomaterials and nanobiomaterials for their applications in drug and gene delivery. Part (1) fundamental biopolymer synthesis: functional group protection and de-protection; bioconjugation; protein pegylation and design and synthesis of natural and synthetic non-degradable and degradable polymers, hydrogels, bio-inspired materials, and stimuli responsive biomaterials. Part (2) preparation of nanomedicines for drug and gene delivery: nanofabritation of micelles, nanoparticles, protein conjugates, drug conjugates, nanoencapsulates, and polymeric vesicles; in-vitro and in-vivo small-molecule, gene, and protein delivery. Impact of the chemical structures of biopolymers on the stability, biocompatibility, toxicity, and in-vitro and in-vivo efficacy; clinical translation of the resulting nanomedicines in drug delivery. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 236 or MSE 457; MCB 450.

MSE 480   Surfaces and Colloids   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Chemistry and physics of surfaces and interfaces, with emphasis on behavior in liquid media. Surface composition; surface and interfacial forces; colloidal stability and flocculation; amphiphilic molecules. Same as CHEM 488. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 401.

MSE 481   Electron Microscopy   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Theory and application of transmission electron microscopy and diffraction with emphasis on thin crystals; electron optics, interference phenomena, interpretation of images and diffraction patterns, specimen preparation. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 405.

MSE 484   Composite Materials   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Metal, ceramic, and polymer matrix composites. Interrelationships between processing, microstructure, and properties. Selecting composite materials for different engineering applications. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 201 and MSE 206.

MSE 485   Atomic Scale Simulations   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Application of Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics techniques in primarily classical simulations to understand and predict properties of microscopic systems in materials science, physics, biology, and chemistry. Numerical algorithms, connections between simulation results and real properties of materials (structural or thermodynamic), and statistical and systematic error estimation using real simulation programs. Simulation project comprised of scientific research, algorithm development, and presentation. Same as CSE 485 and PHYS 466. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 401; one of C, C++, or Fortran programming experience.

MSE 487   Materials for Nanotechnology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Survey of the synthesis, processing, structure properties and technological applications of materials with nanometer dimensions. Semiconductor nanocrystals and size-dependent optical properties; metal nanostructures and plasmonics; nanowires and nanotubes; electronics and optoelectronics; nanoscale heterostructures; assembly and fabrication. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MSE 401 and PHYS 214.

MSE 488   Optical Materials   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Optical properties of materials of current and potential technological importance and application to devices. Applicable optics fundamentals based on Maxwell's equations. Liquid crystals for displays; photopolymers for holographic data storage; electro-optic materials for high speed light modulators; electroluminescent materials for light emitting diodes. Application of optics, materials and chemistry in design of practical devices. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: MATH 285 and PHYS 214.

MSE 489   Matl Select for Sustainability   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Quantitative methods to optimize the selection of materials including traditional (minimize mass or volume, maximize performance) and sustainability (minimize energy consumption and CO2 emission during synthesis, maximize recyclability) goals. Tradeoff methods to optimize both via engineering design and materials selection for product lifetime, economic outlay and return, time dynamics and materials consumption, recycling, and disposal. Application of commercial software to optimize selections. For engineering and science majors only. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

MSE 492   Lab Safety Fundamentals   credit: 1 Hour.

Key aspects of laboratory setups, operating procedures, and emergency preparedness measures necessary for the experimentalist. Same as CHEM 494. 1 undergraduate hour. 1 graduate hour. Approved for S/U grading only.

MSE 497   Independent Study   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Individual study of any topic in materials science and engineering under the supervision of a member of the faculty. 1 to 4 undergraduate hours. 1 to 4 graduate hours. May be repeated to a maximum of 4 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MSE 498   Special Topics   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Subject offerings of new and developing areas of knowledge in materials science and engineering intended to augment the existing curriculum. See Class Schedule or departmental course information for topics and prerequisites. 1 to 4 undergraduate hours. 1 to 4 graduate hours. May be repeated in the same or separate terms if topics vary.

MSE 499   Senior Thesis   credit: 1 to 5 Hours.

Individual research in an area of materials science and engineering under the supervision of members of the staff. 1 to 5 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Grade point average of 3.0 and consent of instructor.