Urban and Regional Planning (UP)

UP Class Schedule

Courses

UP 101   Introduction to City Planning   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides an introduction to urban and regional planning by examining the history of American urbanization, the evolution of American planning thought and practice, and contemporary issues and planning approaches.

UP 116   Urban Informatics I   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduces students to basic analytical techniques used to better understand how cities work. Topics include the foundational statistical concepts of data, variation, and inference. Students formulate a research question about an urban studies or planning issue, collect data, use statistical software to analyze data, and communicate the findings.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Quant Reasoning I

UP 136   Urban Sustainability   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides students with a basic understanding of how to make cities more sustainable by connecting how and where we live to environmental issues. Emphasis on green infrastructure and urban systems, vulnerability and resilience, green design and construction methods, energy production and consumption, and water conservation.

UP 185   Cities in a Global Perspective   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to the process of urbanization from a global perspective by exploring the social, political, cultural and economic forces that shape urban life. Students will learn to analyze urban development in a range of cities including those in the Middle East and South Asia, Latin America and Africa.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences
UIUC: Western Compartv Cult

UP 201   Planning in Action   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduces students to different career paths open to urban studies and planning majors. Students interact with professionals and take part in hands-on activities related to different concentration areas: sustainability, policy & planning, social justice and global cities.

UP 203   Cities: Planning & Urban Life   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides a broad introduction to social science theories and analysis methods to examine how people, communities, and governments plan a city. Draws upon theories and methods of several social science disciplines including economics, geography, political science, anthropology and sociology. Includes hands-on application of fundamental analysis techniques. Credit is not given for both UP 203 and UP 204. Prerequisite: UP 101.

UP 204   Chicago: Planning & Urban Life   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides a broad introduction to social science theories and analysis methods, and uses the City of Chicago as a semester-long case study to examine how people, communities, and governments plan a city. Draws upon theories and methods of several social science disciplines including economics, geography, political science, anthropology, and sociology. Balances themes and concepts from the assigned readings with discussion of Chicago-specific case studies and hands-on application of fundamental analysis techniques. Credit is not given for both UP 204 and UP 203. Prerequisite: UP 101.

UP 205   Ecology & Environmental Sustainability   credit: 3 Hours.

Basic ecological principles underlying environmental sustainability. Examination of problems that arise from inadequate consideration of structure and function of ecological systems, and approaches to ecological restoration and environmentally sound planning. Applications of principles to case studies drawn from urban planning, natural resource management and sustainable development.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Life Sciences

UP 210   Environmental Economics   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as ACE 210, ECON 210, ENVS 210, and NRES 210. See ACE 210.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences

UP 211   Local Planning, Gov't and Law   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides students with a basic understanding of the governmental structure, legal aspects, and practice of local municipal planning, with special emphasis on case law, constitutional principles, zoning, subdivision regulations and comprehensive planning. Gives an introduction for students interested in pursuing more advanced studies in land use law and local government planning.

UP 260   Social Inequality and Planning   credit: 3 Hours.

How are inequalities produced and contested in an urban environment? This course examines this question by analyzing how the urban landscape shapes and is shaped by race, class, and gender inequalities. Uses comparative cases to explore successful intervention, both from formal and informal, across multiple scales from the local to the global.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences

UP 301   Capstone Preparation   credit: 1 Hour.

Students work with capstone advisor to develop a plan to meet the capstone experience requirement. Students submit a proposal at the end of the semester. Approved for S/U grading only. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

UP 312   Communication for Planners   credit: 4 Hours.

Integrates written, verbal, and graphic communication techniques into planning and analysis. Activities simulate professional situations where students develop skills and pieces of broader arguments and synthesize them into final products. Prerequisite: Completion of campus Composition I general education requirement.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Advanced Composition

UP 316   Urban Informatics II   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides an introduction to formal methods for collecting and analyzing data required in various planning processes. Methods include survey research, regional demographic and economic analysis, forecasting techniques, benefit-cost analysis, and decision analysis. Prerequisite: UP 116 or an introductory statistics course.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Quant Reasoning II

UP 330   The Modern American City   credit: 3 Hours.

Explore the transformation of the American city in its journey from abandonment to renewed growth. Cities today are sites of rapid change and experimentation with new ideas for how people can and should live. This course examines the resurgence of American cities, the challenges they face, and their transformation in the 21st century. Each week, class will focus on a different aspect of the modern American city--work, housing, globalization, high finance--and explore its promises, challenges, and implications for the future.

UP 335   Cities and Immigrants   credit: 3 Hours.

Focuses on the experiences of United States cities and towns undergoing rapid demographic economic, social, and cultural changes and the local responses to those changes, including local policy making, land-use regulations, community controversy, and grassroots activism. Same as SOCW 335.

UP 340   Planning for Healthy Cities   credit: 3 Hours.

Explores the evolving role of health in urban planning. Historical and current theories on the relationship between public health and the built environment are highlighted, as are prescriptions for healthy urban design. Community health planning, health disparities, and the needs of special populations in the city are also examined, along with some of the major policy issues affecting urban health care today.

UP 345   Economic Development Planning   credit: 3 Hours.

Public-private-partnerships in urban economic development, including study of potentials, problems, and projects; financing urban economic development through federal grant programs, tax increment financing, and other means.

UP 347   Junior Planning Workshop   credit: 6 Hours.

Introduction to planning practice, with an emphasis on physical planning skills. Includes field observation, spatial data analysis, professional communication, and design. Prerequisite: UP 205, UP 312, UP 260 and UP 316.

UP 357   The Land Development Process   credit: 3 Hours.

The planning practice requires an understanding of the land development process. In this course students will learn about the decision process used for land development and the technical skills required for reading site plans. The course provides the essential skills necessary in the field of public-sector planning. Developers are required to make key determinations in the decision process for developing land. Planners are required to understand these decisions and they must possess the ability to interpret proposed site plans for development. This includes an understanding of existing conditions of land proposed for development and the impact of new development on the site and surrounding areas. This course contains three primary components in teaching an understanding of the land development process. They are: Understanding Market Decision for Developing Land; Reading Site Plans; and Assembling a Development Plan. Credit is not given for UP 357 if credit for UP 347 has already been given. Prerequisite: UP 312-Communication for Planners is highly recommended or basic familiarity with InDesign, Illustrator, and SketchUp.

UP 390   Planning Internship   credit: 0 to 4 Hours.

Professionally supervised field experience in public and private planning or development agencies. Designed to introduce students to professional employment and actual planning practice. Students work in an agency of their own choice, subject to departmental approval, either during the summer session or part-time during a regular term. At least two weeks of full-time employment or its equivalent is required for each term hour of credit to a maximum of 4 hours. Summary reports are submitted by both employer and student. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated. Counts toward the Capstone Experience Requirement. Prerequisite: Upper division undergraduate standing in urban planning.

UP 397   Undergraduate Project   credit: 1 to 3 Hours.

Special projects and applied research related to real world urban problems and professional practice. One credit hour requires approximately 80 hours of work. May be repeated up to 3 hours. Counts toward the Capstone Experience Requirement. Prerequisite: Upper division standing in Urban Planning and consent of Capstone advisor.

UP 401   Undergraduate Capstone Seminar   credit: 1 Hour.

Seminar for peer discussion about the capstone experience and required capstone experience presentation. Students will attend lectures and workshops about career opportunities, resume writing, interviewing, and networking. Meets on a monthly basis. 1 undergraduate hour. No graduate credit. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated in separate terms up to 2 hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

UP 405   Watershed Ecology and Planning   credit: 4 Hours.

Uses the watershed as the basic organizing concept in environmental planning and management; methods for assessing watershed boundaries, soils, land use, and groundwater system processes and developing plans for watershed protection. Emphasizes ecological implications of patterns of land use on functional and qualitative aspects of watershed systems. All-day field trip required. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Should have a previous course in environmental science.

UP 406   Urban Ecology   credit: 4 Hours.

Examines cities as natural systems, combining ecological analyses with historical, anthropological, and sociological studies of urban nature. Addresses ecological sustainability, growth management, biodiversity, restoration, and environmental justice. Required field trip. Same as ENVS 406. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

UP 407   State and Local Public Finance   credit: 4 Hours.

Provides students with an understanding of the fundamental concepts of fiscal planning at the state and local levels of government. Addresses both the theory and methods of state and local finance, focused on state and local fiscal policy. Addresses emerging policy issues involving land use and taxation, spending and budgeting, intergovernmental cooperation, debt financing, financing for economic development, and privatization. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

UP 418   GIS for Planners   credit: 4 Hours.

Detailed introduction to the design and use of computerized geographic information systems, focusing on their significance for planning. Emphasizes GIS within an institutional setting, covering not only fundamental technical concepts, but also organizational, management, and legal issues. Students will be introduced to GIS applications and products through readings, videos, demonstrations, and exercises. Computer laboratory work is included. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Upper division undergaraduate or graduate standing.

UP 420   Plng for Historic Preservation   credit: 4 Hours.

Historic preservation in the context of urban planning, including legal issues and ordinances, economic incentives, comprehensive plans and preservation plans, public participation, media relations, and more. Students will conduct a building survey including research and architectural descriptions for an on-going project in Urbana. Tours of local preservation projects. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: At least junior standing.

UP 423   Community Development in the Global South   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduces students to the main theoretical frameworks and conceptual building blocks of urban and community development in the Global South. It helps students to develop critical grassroots focused understanding of the approaches to development planning, the notion of community participation and empowerment, and the role of various actors including the non-government organizations and the community-based groups. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

UP 426   Urban Design and Planning   credit: 4 Hours.

Concepts and techniques of urban analysis, plan making, and implementation essential for effective interdisciplinary work in urban design. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

UP 428   International Planning Studio   credit: 3 to 6 Hours.

Involves multidisciplinary student teams developing design or policy proposals for urban development of sites in international contexts. The studio combines seminar and studio/workshop formats to apply critical analysis, define planning problems, and propose solutions that integrate the social, economic, physical, and cultural aspects of site development. 3 to 6 undergraduate hours. 3 to 6 graduate hours. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

UP 430   Urban Transportation Planning   credit: 4 Hours.

Role of transportation in urban development and planning; characteristics of urban-person transportation systems and methods of analysis and forecasting of urban-person transportation demand; transportation systems management and capital improvement programming; and emphasis on the needs and activities of metropolitan planning organizations. Same as CEE 417. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

UP 436   Urban Design Workshop   credit: 4 Hours.

Examines urban design theory and principles, and evaluates the built environment in a lab-based setting. Working in teams, students become immersed in real work examples and propose design interventions for specific places, including socially diverse neighborhoods in small cities and major metropolitan urban centers. Normally includes active engagement with community residents. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: UP 426, senior or graduate standing, or consent of instructor.

UP 438   Disasters and Urban Planning   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduction to the role of urban planners in preparing for and rebuilding after disasters. Emphasizes U.S. planning practice, with particular attention to the role of local government. Includes basic U.S. emergency management laws and framework, local mitigation planning, and post-disaster recovery planning. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, senior in Urban Planning, or consent of instructor.

UP 443   Scenarios, Plans & Future Cities   credit: 3 Hours.

This course teaches theories and tools of scenario analysis, a set of techniques useful for making plans and creating more sustainable future cities. Scenario analysis can be used to think about multiple facets of a problem simultaneously and for addressing the uncertain future in light of the limited cognitive and computational capacity of individuals and organizations. Urban planners and policymakers are adopting and extending scenario approaches to envision the future, analyze decisions, and identify robust strategies in situations as varied as comparing projected outcomes of alternative routes for highway investment, to making decisions in situations when formal regulatory mechanisms may be lacking. The need for knowledge and skills in this area is reflected in (1) the growing use of scenario analysis as a required method in many government-funded planning initiative in the United States and around the world, (2) new courses and workshops offered by urban planning programs and professional trainers, such as the American Planning Association and Planetizen, and (3) the sprouting of scenario planning support tools, such as Envision Tomorrow and Index PlanBuilder. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: A completion of an urban planning class would be useful. Junior standing is required.

UP 446   Sustainable Planning Seminar   credit: 4 Hours.

Examines sustainability issues of concern to planners, such as resource conservation, urban growth, environmental justice, industrial development, social equity, sustainable agriculture, and economic development. Presents holistic approaches ranging from theoretical concepts to detailed case studies that combine urban and regional land use, physical design, and policymaking. Same as GEOG 446 and NRES 446. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

UP 447   Land Use Planning Workshop   credit: 4 Hours.

Small group field work applying principles and techniques to specific land use problems in selected jurisdictions. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: UP 211, senior or graduate standing, or consent of instructor.

UP 455   Economic Development Workshop   credit: 4 Hours.

Small group field work applying principles and techniques of economic development planning and policy analysis to specific problems in selected cities, regions, or states. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: UP 345 or consent of instructor.

UP 456   Sustainable Planning Workshop   credit: 4 Hours.

Focuses on applying sustainable planning principles in a real world setting. Readings and research into indices of sustainable development, sustainable urbanism, and related literature help establish parameters for resolving a local planning project. Course is a hybrid workshop with portions of the semester spent on reading, research, and application working with a local planning agency. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: UP 136 and UP 205, senior or graduate standing, or consent of instructor.

UP 457   Small Town/Rural Planning Workshop   credit: 4 Hours.

What is rural and why does it matter? This workshop focuses on small towns and rural communities using Central Illinois communities in local case studies. Students will apply concepts and skills from prior courses and work extensively in teams to compile, synthesize, and communicate information that furthers planning and placemaking efforts. Archival research techniques; analysis of demographic, social, and economic trends; qualitative interviewing; and documentary film production are examples of the kinds of skills students will develop and refine. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: UP 211, senior or graduate standing, or consent of instructor.

UP 460   Transportation/Land Use Policy   credit: 4 Hours.

Provides an integrated perspective and analytical framework for understanding urban transportation and land use policies. Emphasizes the interplay between the built environment and transportation by focusing on: fundamental travel demand theories; performance measures of urban transportation systems; impacts of transportation on land use and urban form; impacts of land use and urban form on travel patterns; congestion pricing; public transportation and active transportation; and transit oriented development (TOD). 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

UP 466   Energy, Plng & Blt Environment   credit: 4 Hours.

Focuses on the study of buildings, including their past and present uses, their place in the environment, and most importantly, how they can become more sustainable. Teaches students to think about and plan physical space from an energy-and climate-centric perspective. Uses climate mitigation and building energy systems-modeling techniques to analyze potential energy systems reductions and approaches to affect a building's carbon footprint. Same as LA 466. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

UP 470   Shrinking Cities   credit: 4 Hours.

This seminar examines urban shrinkage--a phenomenon typically associated with population loss, but also characterized by obsolescence, disinvestment, and abandonment. While some cities thrive and struggle to house the global urban majority, other cities face the stark reality of shrinkage and decline. What should we do to envision and enact a viable future for our shrinking cities? This course will be taught as a seminar, using readings, student facilitated discussions, and lectures as a means for creating a shared understanding around urban shrinkage. Literature from Planning, Economics, Sociology, and other areas will contribute to discussions of the meaning of urban decline as a set of social, economic, and spatial phenomena. Some seminar sessions will be "lab" sessions, focused on developing your analytical skillset via qualitative and quantitative methods. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Credit is not given for UP 470 if credit for UP 494-AG has been given. Prerequisite: Students must have at least a junior standing.

UP 473   Housing & Urban Policy   credit: 4 Hours.

The role of housing in American social policy planning: the history of public and private intervention in housing, regulation of supply and demand within housing markets and market imperfections; analysis of public policies for housing as they affect special populations (for example, the poor, the elderly, the disabled, homeless, and minorities). 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

UP 474   Neighborhood Revitalization   credit: 4 Hours.

Examines rationale and techniques for planning at the neighborhood level; the major social, political, and economic issues that confound public and private sector efforts to revitalize distressed neighborhoods. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

UP 475   Real Estate Development Fundamentals   credit: 4 Hours.

This course will provide an introduction to the fundamental concepts and techniques applied in the real estate development process. In addition, this course will examine both the broader economic and social context in which real estate development is situated as well as how various professions interact within this context. Course assessments will include several case study assignments and a group project using an actual development site that will provide students with the chance to apply the concepts and techniques learned in the course, culminating in a final report and presentation. The overall objective of the course is to provide students with a useful framework for understanding the real estate development process, allowing them to identify viable development opportunities and analyze real estate development projects, while weighing the economic, social, and environmental costs and benefits for a community. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Credit is not given for UP 475 if credit was already given for UP 494-RE. Prerequisite: This course has no prerequisites, however, having had at least an introductory urban planning class would be helpful. Upper-level or graduate standing is recommended.

UP 478   Community Development Workshop   credit: 4 Hours.

Application of community development principles and techniques to the solution of environmental, economic and social problems facing low income urban communities. Involves small group projects and off-campus field work in collaboration with community leaders. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: UP 260, senior or graduate standing, or consent of instructor.

UP 494   Special Topics in Planning   credit: 1 to 6 Hours.

Seminar on topics of current interest, as announced in the Schedule. 1 to 6 undergraduate hours. 1 to 6 graduate hours. May be repeated to a maximum of 16 hours.

UP 501   Planning History and Theory   credit: 4 Hours.

Offers students a survey of classic and contemporary theories of planning. Students will gain a deeper appreciation for the profession's roots as well as be introduced to some of "the theoretical tools" used to analyze planning. An important aspect of the course is intellectual dialogue through critical reading, informed discussion and writing assignments. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Urban Planning or consent of instructor.

UP 503   Physical Planning   credit: 4 Hours.

Provides grounding in the issues and principles underlying physical planning; lecture and discussion sessions are complemented by project work that applies principles and methods. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Urban Planning or consent of instructor.

UP 504   Urban History and Theory   credit: 4 Hours.

Historical and international comparison of the origins and evolution of cities, the process of urbanization, and the human endeavor to effect urban growth and change. Includes history of urban physical form and of planning efforts, emphasizing planning origins in the nineteenth century and transnational influences. Includes equity issues of urban spatial arrangement, including racial segregation and housing market differentiation. Covers elements of urban physical form, including grid and organic structure, commercial city forms, the urban skyline, and urban sprawl. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Urban Planning or consent of instructor.

UP 505   Urban and Regional Analysis   credit: 2 or 4 Hours.

Techniques, data sources, and skills for analyzing regions as economic, social, and spatial systems. The first half of the course focuses on understanding current conditions and trends, and the second half on forecasting most likely and alternative futures. Students may opt to enroll for only the first 8 weeks and receive 2 hours of credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Urban Planning or consent of instructor.

UP 508   Survey Design and Analysis   credit: 2 Hours.

Design of primary data collection instruments, focusing on the large sample survey. Discusses techniques for implementing qualitative and physical data collection by mail, web, and phone. Students learn multivariate statistical techniques for analyzing survey results.

UP 509   Economics for Planners   credit: 4 Hours.

Exploration of how economics can contribute to understanding and solving urban problems. Application of economic analysis and reasoning to the important issues that planners confront, including zoning, land use, housing investment, and transportation. Focuses also on skills to use economic methods effectively.

UP 510   Plan Making   credit: 4 Hours.

Provides skills to develop a wide range of plans and an understanding of the processes to implement them. Topics covered include planning analysis, political constraints of planning and planning ethics, techniques of negotiation, facilitation, mediation, and presentation to the public. Uses a general framework for plan making that includes plan review, problem framing, information gathering, alternative modeling, scenarios development, impact assessment, and alternatives evaluation. Students will work on applied tasks individually and in groups. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

UP 511   Law and Planning   credit: 4 Hours.

Examines the legal framework within which planning takes place in urban areas of this country. Emphasizes the role of law in structuring local government responses to social, economic and physical planning issues and in allocating power among local governments, between local governments and state and federal governments, and between governments and the private sectors of society. Course may not be repeated for credit.

UP 519   Advanced Applications of GIS   credit: 4 Hours.

Advanced course in geographic information systems emphasizing application of GIS to problems involving spatial analysis. Building upon fundamental concepts, students learn to use GIS software frequently found in planning practice. Also prepares students to use GIS in research requiring management and analysis of geographic data. Extensive use of computing workstations. Prerequisite: UP 418 or consent of instructor.

UP 521   International Planning Seminar   credit: 4 Hours.

Advanced graduate seminar concerning urban and regional development processes in a global context. Closely examines critical issues and select topics in international development planning based upon individual research readings. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

UP 535   Local Policy & Immigration   credit: 4 Hours.

Explores major issues confronting urban planners, administrators, elected officials and community activists working in highly diverse communities that are undergoing rapid demographic, economic, social, and cultural change. Focuses specifically on local policy-making in communities with large numbers of immigrants, particularly in cities and regions in the United States, Canada, Australia and Europe. Same as LA 535 and SOCW 535.

UP 543   Environmental Policy &Planning   credit: 4 Hours.

Examines environmental policy and planning from both theoretical and applied perspectives. Provides an overview of the elements of environmental policy at national and state levels and investigates local implementation of environmental policies. Students will learn how local environmental planning practice fits within the broader context of environmental policies. Intended for graduate students in Urban and Regional Planning, but also open to graduate students with appropriate background and interests from Landscape Architecture, Geography, and relevant social sciences. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Urban and Regional Planning or consent of instructor.

UP 545   Economic Development Policy   credit: 4 Hours.

Explores and evaluates urban and regional economic development policy in the U.S. Taking the twin lenses of cities and urbanized regions, it asks why the public sector engages in economic development; how the goals of economic development are defined; and how different policies attempt to steer economic activity and jobs to particular places. The course pays special attention to the question of equity, asking who will benefit from different policies.

UP 546   Land Use Policy and Planning   credit: 4 Hours.

Examines a variety of approaches to land use policy and planning, from both a theoretical and an applied perspective. Explores different values in American land use policy, recent evolution of land use policy. Taught as a seminar.

UP 547   Regional Planning and Policy   credit: 4 Hours.

When are regional approaches more common and why? This course builds knowledge of principles and practices to tackle challenges that go beyond the geographical or disciplinary domain of a single agency. Through readings, seminar discussions, and assignments, students will develop an understanding of problems and settings that involve multiple jurisdictions and actors. Topics will address crosscutting issues such as affordable housing, foreclosures, fiscal stability, and spatial inequality. Prerequisite: Intended for graduate students in Urban and Regional Planning, and others with appropriate background and interests from Public Administration, Political Science, Natural Resources, Civil Engineering, Landscape Architecture, Geography, and relevant social sciences.

UP 552   Regional Development Theory   credit: 4 Hours.

Covers fundamental concepts and theories of regional economic development including export base, neoclassical and endogenous growth, regional convergence, core-periphery, interregional trade, product cycle, industrial districts, entrepreneurship, and regional innovation systems theories. Also discusses policy and planning frameworks for applying regional theory to spatial development problems. Same as ACE 552. Prerequisite: UP 445 and UP 407, or consent of instructor.

UP 580   Advanced Planning Theory   credit: 4 Hours.

Recent advances in planning, policy-making and decision-making theories as they relate to the efficient use of land and to the complex interrelationships among the major uses of land, i.e., housing, transportation, agriculture; specific applications vary annually, reflecting the students' dissertation research topics. Prerequisite: UP 501 or consent of instructor.

UP 585   Advanced Modeling in Planning   credit: 4 Hours.

Seminar on formal models used to analyze planning problems and planning behavior. Includes static and dynamic, linear and non-linear, and deterministic and stochastic optimization models. Derivations of models and methods for solution treated in depth, but the emphasis is on applications to planning problems such as transportation, land use, and environmental management. Specific themes change from year to year. Prerequisite: UP 505 and UP 508, or consent of instructor.

UP 587   Qualitative Research Methods   credit: 4 Hours.

Students use individual research to practice qualitative methods of studying social interaction. Includes field research and historical/archival research methods; project areas include community development, environment, and landscape. Discussion is divided between 1) readings on issues such as techniques and research design, social theory, ethnocentrism, and combining qualitative with quantitative research and 2) student research reports. Same as GEOG 587.

UP 589   Research Design and Methods   credit: 4 Hours.

Prepares students to embark on thesis research and independent grant proposals. Introduces the phases of research design process, including literature review, identification of the research problem, statement of research objectives and questions, establishment of the conceptual framework, and selection of methods, sampling strategies, measurements, and analyses that are most suitable to address the research questions. Provides an overview of the commonly used quantitative and qualitative research methods, e.g., survey, quasi-experiment, and case study. Guides students through the process of writing and reviewing a research proposal and providing feedback to others. Prerequisite: Enrollment in a PhD program or consent of instructor.

UP 590   Professional Internship   credit: 0 Hours.

Summer, part-time, or other professional-level employment in the field of planning, usually in an area of concentration; exposure to the social, political, and institutional setting in which planning operates; and full documentation of internship activities required. Approved for S/U grading only. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

UP 591   Capstone Seminar   credit: 0 Hours.

Provides general capstone advising to MUP students. Seminar is used for peer discussion and feedback about work in progress, as well as to organize for the capstone poster session held each spring semester. Meets on a monthly basis. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated in separate terms.

UP 594   Seminar   credit: 1 to 6 Hours.

Selected topics in urban and regional planning; several sections each term. May be repeated.

UP 596   Independent Study   credit: 0 to 8 Hours.

Independent study in selected urban and regional planning topics under the supervision of an appropriate member of the faculty. Can be used by doctoral students for synthesis paper requirement. Approved for both letter and S/U grading. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours if topics vary.

UP 597   Urban Planning Research   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Individual research work under the supervision of an appropriate member of the faculty. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours. May be used by doctoral students for the research paper requirement. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in Urban and Regional Planning, consent of instructor, and consent of the Department.

UP 598   Master's Project   credit: 4 or 8 Hours.

Major independent or small group project applying planning principles and methods to a current problem in urban and regional planning resulting in a final professional product. Approved for S/U grading only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Urban and Regional Planning, consent of instructor, and consent of the Department.

UP 599   Thesis Research   credit: 0 to 16 Hours.

Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours for Master's students. May be repeated to a maximum of 16 hours for PhD students. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Urban and Regional Planning, consent of instructor, and consent of the Department.