Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC Class Schedule

Courses

PSYC 100   Intro Psych   credit: 4 Hours.

Study of human behavior with special reference to perception, learning, memory, thinking, emotional life, and individual differences in intelligence, aptitude, and personality; emphasis on the scientific nature of psychological investigations; and discussion of research methods and the relation of their results to daily life and everyday problems. Lectures, discussions, and six hours of participation as a subject in psychological experiments. Credit is not given for both PSYC 100 and either PSYC 103 or PSYC 105.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Behavioral Sciences

PSYC 102   Psych Orientation   credit: 0 Hours.

Lectures designed to acquaint the psychology major with the various specializations available in the field, career exploration procedures, and a wide range of opportunities of special interest to psychology students. Recommended for freshmen in psychology. Approved for S/U grading only.

PSYC 103   Intro Experimental Psych   credit: 4 Hours.

Surveys the field of psychology with an emphasis on experimental approaches to understanding the mind and human behavior; addresses perception, learning, memory, thinking, motivation, emotions, personality, development, intelligence, and other topics in psychology. Credit is not given for both PSYC 103 and either PSYC 100 or PSYC 105. Lectures with discussion, debates, and laboratory experiments in weekly sections.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Behavioral Sciences

PSYC 105   Psych Introduction   credit: 4 Hours.

Study of human behavior with special reference to perception, learning, memory, thinking, emotional life, and individual differences in intelligence, aptitude, and personality; emphasis on the scientific nature of psychological investigations; and discussion of research methods and the relation of their results to daily life and everyday problems. Lectures, discussions, and six hours of participation as a subject in psychological experiments. Lectures meet four days per week. See class schedule for enrollment restrictions. Credit is not given for both PSYC 105 and either PSYC 100 or PSYC 103.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Behavioral Sciences

PSYC 199   Undergraduate Open Seminar   credit: 1 to 5 Hours.

Approved for letter and S/U grading. May be repeated.

PSYC 201   Intro to Social Psych   credit: 3 Hours.

Systematic study of social factors in individual and group behavior; attention to social perception, motivation, and learning; attitudes, norms, and social influence processes; the development and dynamics of groups; and the effects of social and cultural factors on the individual. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or PSYC 103.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Behavioral Sciences

PSYC 204   Intro to Brain and Cognition   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of cognitive neuroscience, which is concerned with how the cognitive systems supporting a broad range of capacities including memory, attention, and social and emotional processing, arise from the functioning of specific brain modules and brain mechanisms. Emphasizes how functional brain imaging and other cognitive neuroscience methods can be brought to bear on answering these questions. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or PSYC 103 or PSYC 105.

PSYC 207   Psychology of Prejudice and Discrimination   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the psychological causes and social consequences of prejudice and discrimination in society. Learn about the current state of prejudice and discrimination in the U.S., empirical methods for studying prejudice and discrimination, and psychological interventions for reducing prejudice and discrimination. Topics include stereotyping, cognitive biases, group conflict, ideology, implicit associations, subtle and benevolent forms of prejudice, and microaggressions.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Behavioral Sciences

PSYC 210   Behavioral Neuroscience   credit: 3 Hours.

Survey of current knowledge and speculation regarding the brain's role in perception, motivation, sexual behavior, thinking, memory, and learning, based upon human clinical data and research in animal models. Prerequisite: PSYC 100, PSYC 103, or consent of instructor.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Life Sciences

PSYC 216   Child Psych   credit: 3 Hours.

Study of the psychological development of the child. Credit is not given for both PSYC 216 and EPSY 236. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or PSYC 103.

PSYC 220   Images of Mind   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to neuroimaging and cognitive neuroscience, with a particular emphasis on critically evaluating neuroscience in the media. In addition to surveying reports in the popular press and their corresponding science articles, covers basic neuroanatomy, neuroimaging techniques, and a range of topics from cognitive neuroscience. Prerequisite: PSYC 100, PSYC 103, PSYC 105 or consent of instructor.

PSYC 224   Cognitive Psych   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to the psychological study of human information processing and memory; acquisition, retrieval, and forgetting; and general knowledge, concepts, reasoning, and related issues in cognition. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or PSYC 103.

PSYC 230   Perception & Sensory Processes   credit: 3 Hours.

Survey of the experimental psychology of sensory and perceptual processes and behavior; emphasis on the contribution of behavior science to understanding subjective experience of the physical and social environment. Prerequisite: An introductory course in psychology, physiology, or animal biology.

PSYC 235   Intro to Statistics   credit: 3 Hours.

Development of skill and understanding in the application of statistical methods to problems in psychological research; topics include descriptive statistics, probability theory and distributions, point and interval estimation, and hypothesis testing. Credit is not given for both PSYC 235 and any of STAT 100, ECON 202, EPSY 480, PSYC 301, SOC 485. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or PSYC 103; college algebra or equivalent; or consent of academic advisor.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Quant Reasoning I

PSYC 238   Psychopathology and Problems in Living   credit: 3 Hours.

Conceptions and facts about disordered behavior, including psychoses, neuroses, and other patterns of psychological disturbance. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or PSYC 103.

PSYC 239   Community Psych   credit: 3 Hours.

Redefines human and social problems and the implications for social programs and policies; reviews the historical antecedents, conceptual models, strategies and tactics of social and community programs; and employs examples from selected social systems (e.g., criminal justice, education, employment, and mental health). Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or PSYC 103.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences

PSYC 245   Industrial Org Psych   credit: 3 Hours.

Systematic study of the application of psychological methods and principles in business and industry; emphasis on personnel selection and factors influencing efficiency. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or PSYC 103; credit or concurrent registration in a statistics course.

PSYC 248   Learning and Memory   credit: 3 Hours.

Survey of basic phenomena in learning and memory emphasizing experimental data from animal and human research. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or PSYC 103.

PSYC 250   Psych of Personality   credit: 3 Hours.

Study of personality from various points of view: biological, experimental, social, and humanistic; surveys theory and empirical research in the study of personality. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or PSYC 103.

PSYC 265   Power, Status, and Influence   credit: 3 Hours.

Explores how individuals experience power, status, and influence. The course will focus on the personality and social factors that lead people to attain an elevated rank in society. We will examine how social position shapes basic psychological processes including social perception, relationship strategies, emotion, and well-being across the life course. Multiple forms of power and status will be studied, including those based on peer respect, class, race, gender, and physical dominance.

PSYC 290   Research Experience in Psych   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Supervised participation in research and scholarly activities, usually as an assistant to an investigator. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 hours. Prerequisite: Ten hours of psychology or cognate area, or written consent of instructor.

PSYC 296   Introduction to Current Topics in Psychology   credit: 0 to 3 Hours.

Introductory treatment of current topics in the field of psychology. May be repeated up to 6 hours in the same semester, to a total of 9 hours in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor.

PSYC 301   Psychological Statistics   credit: 5 Hours.

Development of skill and understanding of statistical methods for problems in psychological research; topics include descriptive statistics, probability theory and distributions, point and interval estimation, and hypothesis testing. The class also involves a computer laboratory. Strongly recommended to students who plan to pursue graduate studies in Psychology. Credit is not given for both PSYC 301 and any of STAT 100, ECON 202, EPSY 480, PSYC 235, SOC 485.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Quant Reasoning I

PSYC 306   Psychology of Morality   credit: 3 Hours.

Presents an overview and analysis of historical and current theory and research on moral psychology. Explores development of morality, moral reasoning and decision-making, rational and biased inputs to moral judgments, moral emotions, moral impression formation and person perception. Emphasis is on the social psychology of morality, but other perspectives such as developmental, cognitive, political, and individual differences will be explored. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or equivalent.

PSYC 308   Psychology of Religion and Spirituality   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines major topics in the psychology of religion and spirituality to promote reflection on how religion shapes attitudes, behavior, and contemporary U.S. society. Through the lens of psychology, we explore questions such as: Why are some people religious and spiritual? How do we study religion and spirituality from a psychological perspective? What do religion and spirituality look like across the lifespan? Does religion shape prejudice, morality, violence, or altruism? What is the role of religion in promoting health? Overall, we will examine these and other questions to promote greater understanding regarding the role of religion and spirituality in the lives of individuals and larger society. Same as REL 308. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or equivalent.

PSYC 311   Behavioral Neuroscience Lab   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduction to the research techniques used in behavioral neuroscience: includes behavioral analysis of drug effects, anatomy of the brain, hormones and behavior, neural circuits and related topics. Students will have direct experience working with laboratory rats to understand their importance in the advancement of our knowledge about how the brain functions. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent registration in PSYC 210, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 312   Psychology of Race & Ethnicity   credit: 3 Hours.

Exploration of the theoretical, empirical, and experiential writings concerning the issues of race and ethnicity as they relate to human behavior from the perspective of the individual in various social contexts. Same as AFRO 312. Prerequisite: PSYC 100.

PSYC 316   Intro to Psych of Hearing   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the physiology and psychophysics of hearing from the micromechanics of the cochlea to the localization of sound and the acoustics of concert halls, to understand how the auditory system processes information to create perceptions of acoustic events. Prerequisite: PSYC 210.

PSYC 318   Psych of the Infant   credit: 3 Hours.

Early infant behavior, emphasizing critical evaluation of the various research techniques; prenatal and perinatal influences, ontogeny of psychological processes, environmental determinants, and infant assessment. Prerequisite: PSYC 216.

PSYC 320   The Teenage Years   credit: 3 Hours.

An introduction to development during the teenage years (12-18). The course will cover research on biological, cognitive, social, and emotional development. Topics will include pubertal development and its social consequences, changing relationships with parents, identity development, the increasingly important role of peers, school adjustment, the emergence of psychopathologies, and high risk behaviors such as substance use. The course will focus on normative development in the U.S., but it will also cover cross-cultural development. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and PSYC 216.

PSYC 321   Human Memory   credit: 3 Hours.

Advanced treatment of human memory. Examines basic theory and methodology; types of memory; semantic, episodic, procedural, memory for language, places, and events; knowledge and memory; autobiographical memory; exceptional memory; mnemonics. Prerequisite: Six hours in psychology at or above the 200 level, such as PSYC 224 or PSYC 248.

PSYC 322   Intro Intellectual Disability   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as REHB 322 and SPED 322. See SPED 322.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Behavioral Sciences

PSYC 324   Developmental Psychopathology   credit: 3 Hours.

Overview of major theories and research in the field of developmental psychopathology. An emphasis will be placed on understanding how psychopathology is conceptualized from a developmental perspective. Topics will involve issues related to etiology, assessment, classification/diagnosis, and intervention. A range of psychological problems in childhood and adolescence will be discussed to illustrate the central themes. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and either PSYC 216 or PSYC 238, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 326   Development and Relationships   credit: 3 Hours.

Advanced overview of theory and research on interpersonal relationships across the life course and their implications for emotion, cognition, and behavior. Particular emphasis is placed on close relationships, i.e., romantic partners, family members, and mentors. Same as EPSY 330. Prerequisite: PSYC 216.

PSYC 328   Psychology of Gender   credit: 3 Hours.

Discusses the similarities and differences between males and females across the lifespan, looking at possible biological and social explanations. Some of the topics covered include how children learn gender roles, similarities and differences across cognitive and social abilities, mental and physical health, and gender in different settings, including at work, at school, and at home. The course will also focus on agents of socialization, including the media, peers, and family. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or equivalent.

PSYC 331   Cognitive Psych Lab   credit: 4 Hours.

Examination of the methods used to study human thought processes, including attention, memory, decision-making, language and concepts. Students will learn to design, carry out, and report research in cognitive psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 224 or PSYC 248; PSYC 235.

PSYC 332   Social Psych Methods Lab   credit: 4 Hours.

Lecture and laboratory in the methods and techniques of social psychology research in laboratory settings. Same as SOC 382. Prerequisite: PSYC 201; PSYC 235 or SOC 280.

PSYC 333   Social Psych in Society Lab   credit: 4 Hours.

Methods and techniques of social psychological research in natural settings. Students formulate and carry out research problems using procedures appropriate for research in natural settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 201; PSYC 235 or SOC 280.

PSYC 334   Perception Lab   credit: 4 Hours.

Examination of the research methods used to study human visual and spatial processes, including visual illusion, attention, imagery, navigation and spatial memory. Students will learn to design, carry out, and report psychological research. Prerequisite: PSYC 230 and statistics (PSYC 235 or equivalent).

PSYC 336   Topics in Clin/Comm Psych   credit: 3 Hours.

Survey and critical review of subdisciplines in clinical/community psychology; concepts, methods, and assessments, intervention strategies and tactics. Subdisciplines addressed will vary. See Class Schedule for current titles. May be repeated with approval to a maximum of 6 undergraduate hours in same term, or to a maximum of 9 undergraduate hours in subsequent terms. Prerequisite: PSYC 238 or PSYC 239 or both depending on topic.

PSYC 340   Community Projects   credit: 4 Hours.

Principles of psychology applied to service problems in the community; students serve as nonprofessional mental health workers in supervised experiences in schools, hospitals, and other nontraditional settings. May be repeated in the same or subsequent terms to a maximum of 8 undergraduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 100; junior or senior standing; and consent of instructor. Individual sections may require additional courses and prerequisites - consult the instructor.

PSYC 341   Advanced Community Projects   credit: 4 Hours.

Advanced discussion and practicum on principles of psychology which may supplement mental health and other human services in a community. Students serve as nonprofessional mental health workers in supervised experiences in school hospitals and other nontraditional settings. May be repeated in the same or subsequent terms to a maximum of 8 undergraduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 340 and consent of instructor.

PSYC 350   Personality Lab   credit: 4 Hours.

Study of personality emphasizing active participation in designing, conducting, analyzing, and presenting of research; lectures concern the practical aspects of research methodology and the philosophy of personality research; and laboratory involves conducting original research in small groups. Prerequisite: PSYC 235 or equivalent; and PSYC 250 or consent of instructor; completion of campus Composition I general education requirement.

PSYC 351   Thinking and Reasoning   credit: 3 Hours.

An overview of historical and contemporary research on thinking, reasoning, and problem-solving. Topics will include normative systems of logic, defeasible/non-monotonic reasoning, psychological models of reasoning, heuristic problem-solving, insight and creativity, Bayesian decision-making, decision-making biases, and fast-and-frugal heuristics. Same as PHIL 351. Prerequisite: Either PSYC 100 and PSYC 224, or PHIL 101 and PHIL 102, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 352   Attitude Theory and Change   credit: 3 Hours.

Comprehensive analysis of theories of attitude acquisition, organization, and change; emphasis on attitude change through communication and effects of persuasive communication on public opinion. Same as MACS 352 and SOC 300. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 or equivalent.

PSYC 353   Social Cognition   credit: 3 Hours.

Analysis of theory and research on problems related to the manner in which persons judge themselves and others on the basis of information received; topics include impression formation integration, determinants of interpersonal attractions, and attribution processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and PSYC 235, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 356   Evolution of Mind   credit: 3 Hours.

Interpretation of human thought and behavior through the lens of evolutionary theory. Presents the basics of evolutionary theory as applied to human and animal psychology, describes the results of research on selected subtopics, and evaluates alternative explanations of human behavior that historically have been offered and continue to influence the social sciences today. The goal is to enhance understanding of why we behave the way we do. Special emphasis will be places on philosophical analysis of the presented material. Same as PHIL 356. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or PHIL 101 or MCB 150 or consent of instructor.

PSYC 357   Intro Cognitive Science   credit: 3 Hours.

In-depth introduction to cognitive science: the study of mind and intelligence, natural and artificial. Covers major integrative themes including inverse optics and vision; induction and reasoning; learnability; language; philosophy; minds and brains; evolution; computation and computability; experimental and modeling techniques; information theory; knowledge representation; interrelations among these topics. Same as PHIL 357. Prerequisite: One of PSYC 224, PSYC 248, PHIL, 202, PHIL 270, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 361   The Psychology of Aging   credit: 3 Hours.

Survey of changes in behavioral function in later adulthood, with emphasis on methodologies for studying aging, cognitive function, personality, social psychology, and psychopathology. Prerequisite: PSYC 100; Recommended: PSYC 216 or PSYC 224.

PSYC 363   Developmental Child Psych Lab   credit: 4 Hours.

Provides students with a background in developmental research methodology, such as observational techniques used with children. Students will gain experience collecting data and learn how to write research papers. Prerequisite: PSYC 216 and PSYC 235, or equivalent.

PSYC 365   Stress, Trauma and Resilience   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of traumatic stress, with a particular emphasis on the biological and social factors that shape human responses to trauma. Students will become familiar with the definition and range of potentially traumatic events in various social contexts (e.g. military vs. civilian), as well as the genetic and environmental features that influence vulnerability vs. resilience to trauma. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or equivalent.

PSYC 370   Understanding Suicide   credit: 3 Hours.

Exploration of the enigma of suicide, covering its many dimensions including the historical, literary, neurobiological psychological, sociological, cultural, public health, and personal/subjective. Suicide has been studied from each of these perspectives, and while there is agreement that it is a "multidimensional malaise," bringing these dimensions together has been extremely challenging. Explores this challenge through lectures and discussions. Prerequisite: PSYC 238.

PSYC 373   Culture & Psychology   credit: 3 Hours.

Centers on cross-cultural study of substantive areas such as personality, motivation, socialization, interpersonal behavior, psychological environments, cognition and cognitive development, ethnocentrism and stereotypes, and visual perception; emphasis on methodological limitations and contributions of cross-cultural study; and discussion of current problems and research. Same as ANTH 373. Prerequisite: Six hours of psychology or anthropology, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 379   Clinical/Abnormal Psych Lab   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduction to research methods used in clinical psychology covering research concerned with psychopathology. Students will learn concepts and key terms; read and discuss research reports; and obtain first-hand experience designing, carrying out, and reporting on their own research. Students in the class will be the participants for all student-developed research. Prerequisite: PSYC 238.

PSYC 381   Beg Prac in Mental Hlth   credit: 4 Hours.

Didactic instruction and supervised practicum experience in a community treatment agency; self-report, observational, and physiological approaches to client assessment; and lecture-discussion and direct agency experience each week.

PSYC 383   Adv Prac in Mental Hlth I   credit: 4 Hours.

Supervised practicum experiences in a community agency.

PSYC 385   Adv Prac in Mental Hlth II   credit: 4 Hours.

Supervised practicum experiences in a community agency.

PSYC 396   Intermediate Current Topics in Psychology   credit: 0 to 3 Hours.

Intermediate treatment of current topics in the field of psychology. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours in a semester, to a maximum of 12 hours in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or consent of instructor; particular sections may have additional 200-level prerequisites.

PSYC 398   Junior Honors Seminar   credit: 3 Hours.

Seminar on experimental methods and contemporary psychological research. Prerequisite: Junior standing and admission to departmental honors program.

PSYC 402   Intro Clin Neuropsych   credit: 4 Hours.

Fundamental concepts of clinical neuropsychology will be introduced, and students will learn the neuropsychological measures that are typically employed in assessment. The course will take a developmental perspective, and readings will address assessment issues in children and adolescents as well as adults. The course will be conducted as a lecture/seminar, with a focus on class participation. Actual testing data will be distributed to the class, and discussion will focus on interpretation and case conceptualization. Students will also be required to learn about and administer tests. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 210 and PSYC 238 or consent of instructor.

PSYC 403   Memory and Amnesia   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examination of the nature of amnesia and what it teaches us about the organization of normal human memory. Coverage will include studies of amnesia and other circumscribed memory impairments in human patients, taken from the scientific literature, which will be compared to the descriptions of amnesia in movies, literature, and the media. Same as NEUR 403. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 210 and/or PSYC 224, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 404   Cognitive Neuroscience   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examination of research concerned with identifying and characterizing the cognitive systems supporting such capacities as memory, attention, and visual processing, and with understanding how such cognitive activities arise from the functioning of specific brain modules and brain mechanisms. Same as NEUR 405. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 210 and/or PSYC 224, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 413   Psychopharmacology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Behavioral and physiological effects of chemicals either used therapeutically to treat psychological disorders or that may be abused for their psychotropic effects; emphasizes mechanisms and models for the study of drug action. Same as NEUR 413. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 210, MCB 150, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 414   Brain, Learning, and Memory   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Conveys a knowledge of current research on the physiological bases of learning and memory; considers a wide range of topics from molecular (e.g., cellular morphological and functional plasticity) to relatively molar (e.g., effects of clinical and experimental brain damage on learning and memory processes). Same as NEUR 414. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 210, MCB 150, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 417   Neuroscience of Eating & Drinking   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Eating and drinking are critical to survival. Despite complex and redundant mechanisms, aberrant ingestive behaviors occur and can result in extreme body weights. This course is designed to critically probe and review the current understanding of neural and behavioral mechanisms of eating and drinking. Students will learn how eating and drinking are closely related to physical and mental health, and how to apply this knowledge to live a healthier life. Same as FSHN 417 and NEUR 417. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or equivalent.

PSYC 421   Principles of Psychophysiology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Theoretical and practical aspects of human psychophysiology; measurement techniques and the application of psychophysiological principles to problems in developmental, clinical, social, and experimental psychology. Same as NEUR 421. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 235, six hours of psychology, and an introductory course in physiology.

PSYC 423   Language Acquisition   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Survey of theory and research on the acquisition of language, concentrating on the acquisition of a first language by the young child. Same as LING 423 and MACS 423. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Six hours of psychology or linguistics above the 100-level, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 425   Psych of Language   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Survey of theory and research in the psychology of language; topics include relation of linguistics and psychology, language development, and influence of language on perception, memory, and thought. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Credit is not given for both PSYC 425 and LING 425. Prerequisite: Six hours of psychology or consent of instructor.

PSYC 433   Evolutionary Neuroscience   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Current methods, tools, and progress in evolutionary biology and quantitative genetics of brain and behavior of vertebrates. Same as NEUR 433 and PHIL 433. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: IB 150 or PSYC 210.

PSYC 437   Advanced Psychology Lab   credit: 4 Hours.

An advanced laboratory course in different areas of psychology. Detailed descriptions are provided under the individual sections. 4 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated in separate semesters to a maximum of 8 undergraduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 100, additional courses and prerequisites may be required depending on the lab.

PSYC 445   Cognitive Neuroscience Lab   credit: 4 Hours.

Study of the basic principles underlying scanning of the brain using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). The lectures introduce how to use an MRI scanner, the basic biophysics that makes functional imaging possible, experimental design for fMRI, and basic data analysis. During the labs, students will get hands on experience analyzing fMRI data. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYC 204, PSYC 210, PSYC 220, or consent of the instructor. PSYC 235 or equivalent is recommended.

PSYC 450   Cognitive Psychophysiology   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Survey of the theory and practice of using recordings of brain electrical activity to study normal and abnormal perception, attention, decision-making, memory, response preparation, and language. Same as NEUR 450. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 224 or equivalent; PSYC 210 recommended.

PSYC 451   Neurobio of Aging   credit: 0 to 4 Hours.

Study of the neurobiological consequences of aging with an emphasis on brain changes at the cellular and systems level, using animal models of healthy and pathological aging. Same as KIN 458 and NEUR 451. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 210 or related courses or consent of instructor.

PSYC 453   Cog Neuroscience of Vision   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Overview of the neuroscience of the visual system, the eye and subcortical structures, with a focus on the visual cortex and higher-level vision (e.g. attention and object perception). Same as NEUR 453. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 210, PSYC 220, PSYC 224, PSYC 230 or consent of instructor.

PSYC 455   Organizational Psych   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

Social psychological research and theory applied to industrial problems; emphasis on interaction and communication theory, role theory, leadership theory, motivational and perceptual theory, and group structure theory as an aid in understanding and analyzing industrial problems. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 to 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 or PSYC 245.

PSYC 462   How Children Think   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examines the development of children's thinking from birth through the preschool and elementary school years. Addresses questions such as the following: What do babies know about the world? What can they perceive, and how do their perceptual abilities develop? How do children come to understand other people's actions and mental states? How do they think about biological categories (such as animals and plants) and social categories (such as boys and girls)? When and how do children learn what numbers mean? How is children's development influenced by culture? 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 216.

PSYC 465   Personality and Soc Dev   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Major theories of personality and social development, with attention to processes of social learning, individual differences in personality development, and outcomes of social development; applications to school, home, and other field settings. Same as EPSY 405. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 216 or EPSY 236 or equivalent.

PSYC 466   Image and Neuroimage Analysis   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Fundamental concepts, techniques/algorithms, and emerging directions of research in image and neuroimage analysis: image enhancement, image and brain image segmentation, neuroimage registration, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) time series analysis, and brain connectivity, etc. Same as STAT 466. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: One of STAT 400, PSYC 406, an equivalent, or consent of instructor; basic programming experience in Matlab, or C/C++, or similar.

PSYC 468   Psych and Law   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

Examines relationship of the administrative, civil, and criminal justice systems to educational and mental health institutions; individual rights, social issues, and psychological well being. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 to 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Six hours of social science.

PSYC 475   Personnel Psych   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Introduces problems and research relevant to personnel issues in organizations. Topics include: individual differences; selection of personnel; test theory; performance appraisal; equal employment opportunity legislation, regulation, and litigation; assessing bias in selection. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 235 or equivalent, and either PSYC 245 or BADM 313.

PSYC 484   Ethical Practice of Statistics   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Study of the ethical practice of statistics, defined as being in accord with the accepted rules and standards for right conduct that govern the discipline of statistics and its many areas of application. An emphasis is placed on the use of statistical and probabilistic reasoning in the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences, with particular stress on the relation to law and the judiciary. Same as STAT 484. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: An introductory statistics class, e.g., PSYC 235, PSYC 301, STAT 100, ECON 202, EPSY 480, SOC 280.

PSYC 489   Neural Network Modeling Lab   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Introduction to neural network modeling, the principles of neural computation, learning algorithms and the evaluation of neural networks as models of human perception and cognition. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: College algebra or equivalent; computer programming experience, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 490   Measurement & Test Develop Lab   credit: 4 Hours.

The measurement of human behavior in psychological studies; the construction and use of psychological tests; introduction to tests of intelligence, achievement, personality, and interest; and practice in test construction, administration, and validation. Lectures and laboratory. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: A knowledge of statistics equivalent to that from PSYC 235.

PSYC 492   Capstone Undergrad Research   credit: 3 Hours.

Capstone experience for undergraduate students doing advanced research in any area of psychology. Provides in-depth background knowledge of their research, and teaches students to make effective oral and written presentations of their findings. In conjunction with PSYC 494, will facilitate the preparation of a Bachelor's thesis that can be submitted for the awarding of the departmental distinction at graduation. May be taken for two semesters with the first semester emphasizing a review of the literature and the second semester concentrating on the presentation of the results. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Psychology, consent of instructor, and students must arrange to do a research project with a faculty member.

PSYC 494   Advanced Research in Psych   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Supervised independent investigation of special topics in psychology; requires a written report with a final copy submitted for departmental records. 1 to 4 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours. Prerequisite: Ten hours of psychology or cognate area, or written consent of instructor.

PSYC 495   Internship Capstone Experience   credit: 3 Hours.

This capstone seminar will connect students' summer internship experiences to their academic major in Psychology and to their career goals. Students will reflect, discuss and build on their internship experiences to help them identify the skills and abilities they have and need to be successful. They will participate in both individual assignments and team projects that will facilitate their ability to communicate in the many different careers available to students with a degree in psychology. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Prerequisite: Completion of an internship during previous summer.

PSYC 496   Adv Current Topics in Psych   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

Advanced treatment of current topics in the field of psychology. 2 to 4 undergraduate hours. 2 to 4 graduate hours. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and junior standing, or consent of instructor; particular sections may have additional 200-level and/or 300-level prerequisites.

PSYC 498   Senior Honors Seminar   credit: 3 Hours.

Continuation of PSYC 398, this course assists students in the Psychology Honors Program with the researching and writing of an undergraduate honors thesis, under supervision of a faculty member, on a problem of appropriate scope and character. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Prerequisite: PSYC 398.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Advanced Composition

PSYC 499   Senior Honors Seminar II   credit: 3 Hours.

The completion of writing of an undergraduate honors thesis, under supervision of a faculty member, on a problem of appropriate scope and character. Students also create posters describing their work for presentation at the Psychology Honors Poster Fair and the Campus Undergraduate Research Symposium. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. PSYC 398 and PSYC 499 are approved for General Education credit only as a sequence. All courses must be completed to receive Advanced Composition credit. Prerequisite: PSYC 498.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Advanced Composition

PSYC 500   Professional Develop for Psych   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Provides practical guidance to graduate students in psychology about a variety of professional issues, including topics such as publishing, speaking, writing, teaching, research ethics, mentoring, interviewing for jobs, and preparing for different career options. The course is discussion-based and provides a forum to address common questions and problems encountered by graduate students in psychology. 1 to 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Approved for Letter and S/U grading. May be repeated up to 8 credit hours if topics vary.

PSYC 501   Best Psych Research Practices   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

Explores topics concerning the best research practices used in the different areas of psychology. Examination of recent advances in research design, analysis, and reporting will hone methodological and statistical intuitions. Students will investigate the growing literature on problematic practices, consider proposed solutions, and construct and evaluate simulations to enhance their understanding of the best methodologies so they can contribute to a more open and reproducible psychological science. 2 to 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. May be repeated up to 8 graduate hours, if topics vary.

PSYC 503   Categories and Concepts   credit: 4 Hours.

The psychology of human concepts, including concept learning, categorization, the structure of concepts in memory and conceptual development. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or consent of the instructor.

PSYC 504   Theories of Attention   credit: 2 or 4 Hours.

Systematic study of the psychology of attention, including focused and divided attention, dual-task performance, attention and memory, attention and automatization, and skilled performance. The emphasis is primarily theoretical, focusing on current approaches and the historical developments that led to them. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology or consent of instructor.

PSYC 506   Statistical Methods I   credit: 4 Hours.

Techniques in applied statistics used in psychological research, including simple linear regression, partial and multiple correlation, and nonparametric methods; thorough review of statistical estimation and significance tests; emphasizes applied statistics and statistical computing. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Credit is not given for both PSYC 506 and SOC 586. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

PSYC 507   Statistical Methods II   credit: 4 Hours.

Continuation of PSYC 506. Experimental design, including Latin Squares, factorials, and nested designs; expected mean squares; analysis of covariance; emphasizes the general linear model. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Credit is not given for both PSYC 507 and SOC 587. Prerequisite: PSYC 506.

PSYC 508   Intro to Systems Neuroscience   credit: 4 Hours.

In-depth, comprehensive introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system. This focus is on systems neuroscience rather than at the cellular or molecular neuroscience. To prepare students for study in a variety of areas in neuroscience at the graduate level, the lectures will supply key, fundamental knowledge in many areas of neuroscience and then progress to an advanced level. The labs will provide a solid, basic knowledge of neuroanatomy and experience working with different neuroscience techniques. Same as MCB 508 and NEUR 508. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

PSYC 509   Psych Scaling Multidimen Meth   credit: 4 Hours.

Basic scaling theory; metric, non-metric, and individual differences multidimensional scaling models and methodology, emphasizing underlying assumptions and interpretation; and applications of scaling methods to measurement problems in social and personality psychology, perception, cognition, and sociology. Same as SOC 589. Prerequisite: PSYC 407, SOC 587, or equivalent course in quantitative methods.

PSYC 510   Advances in Behavioral Neuroscience   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Deals with the relevance of behavioral neuroscience to the subdisciplines of psychology; topics include behavioral genetics, hormones and sexuality, eating and drinking, human memory models and the brain, biorhythms in normal and abnormal behavior, physiology of sensing and perceiving, selective attention, and others. Same as NEUR 510. 3 or 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Consent of instructor is required for more than 3 hours of credit. Prerequisite: PSYC 210 or consent of instructor.

PSYC 514   Seminar in Cognitive Science   credit: 2 or 4 Hours.

In-depth view of cognitive science: the study of mind and intelligence. Covers major areas of cognitive science including: anthropology, artificial intelligence, cognitive neuroscience, cognitive psychology, emotions, linguistics, and philosophy. Lectures focus on prominent questions and issues in each area highlighted by descriptions of current research. Also explores interconnections among these fields. Same as ANTH 514, CS 549, EPSY 551, LING 570, and PHIL 514. Prerequisite: Minimally second semester graduate standing in a cognitive science discipline including: anthropology, computer science, educational psychology, electrical engineering, linguistics, philosophy, psychology, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 516   Perception   credit: 4 Hours.

Systematic study of methods and research findings in the field of human perception, together with an evaluation of theoretical interpretations. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of psychology.

PSYC 518   Exp Psych Human Learn   credit: 4 Hours.

Data and theories of verbal learning; verbal mediators and their functions in learning and retention; transfer of training; short-term and long-term memory; and conceptualizations of the forgetting process. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of psychology or consent of instructor.

PSYC 521   Knowledge Representation   credit: 4 Hours.

Surveys theories and data about the representation of knowledge by human beings; examines images, concepts, semantic features, propositions, semantic nets, rules, parallel distributed, procedural, schemas, mental models, and theories. Prerequisite: Background in either cognitive psychology, linguistics, or artificial intelligence.

PSYC 523   Prob Solving and Cog Skill Acq   credit: 4 Hours.

Selected topics in how people solve problems and learn cognitive skills. A broad range of empirical findings will be discussed, along with psychological and computational accounts. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PSYC 524   Dev Psycholinguistics   credit: 2 or 4 Hours.

Examination of empirical and theoretical literature on the acquisition of language; emphasis on universal patterns in the acquisition of a first language and on a consideration of explanations, both psychological and linguistic, for these patterns. Same as LING 524 and MDIA 524. Prerequisite: LING 425, PSYC 425 or PSYC 462, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 525   Psycholinguistics   credit: 2 or 4 Hours.

Critical survey of psychological research on language and communication; emphasis on psychological processes that allow humans to produce and understand speech, writing, and gesture. Same as LING 525 and MDIA 525. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PSYC 526   Adv Psycholinguistics   credit: 2 or 4 Hours.

Overview of psychological research investigating the perceptual, cognitive, neuropsychological, and behavioral events that accompany speaking, reading, or listening to language. Examines adult language processing as well as the development of specific language skills and the nature of related language disorders. Same as EPSY 566. May be repeated in the same or separate terms to a maximum of 12 hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 525 or consent of instructor.

PSYC 530   Found of Ind Org Psych   credit: 4 Hours.

Theoretical and empirical foundations of various content areas in industrial-organizational psychology; sample topics include employee selection and placement, training, human factors engineering, work motivation, employee attitudes, leadership, and organizational theory. Same as LER 530. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of psychology or consent of instructor.

PSYC 531   Psych Measurement in Indus   credit: 4 Hours.

Application of psychometric methods and the finding of differential psychology to the selection, classification, and performance evaluation of industrial personnel. Prerequisite: PSYC 407 or equivalent.

PSYC 532   Intro to Clin-Comm Psych III   credit: 4 Hours.

Part 3 of a 4 part sequence designed to provide clinical community graduate students with a broad overview of theories, approaches, and methods in clinical and community psychology. This set of courses includes coverage of all major domains in clinical-community psychology, including psychopathology/problems in living, clinical-community assessment, diagnosis, effective interventions and their evaluation, and prevention. These courses are also meant to engage graduate students in the process of critical inquiry in clinical-community psychology. Required of all entering graduate students in clinical-community psychology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor required for all students not admitted to graduate program in clinical-community psychology.

PSYC 533   Intern in Ind Org Psych   credit: 4 Hours.

Supervised practice in organizational practice and research, implementation of programs, evaluation, feedback of survey results, applied assessments, assistance in EAP programs, and development of personnel guidelines; emphasizes applications of principles and procedures. Offered in special interest of graduate students in I/O psychology program. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology, credit or concurrent registration in PSYC 530, and consent of instructor.

PSYC 534   Models of Decision and Choice   credit: 4 Hours.

Survey of mathematical and other formal models of human judgment and decision processes. Emphasizes differences between normative and descriptive models. Same as ACCY 595. Prerequisite: PSYC 407.

PSYC 536   Dev Cultural Psychology   credit: 4 Hours.

Analysis of current developments, trends, and controversies in developmental cultural psychology, with an emphasis on how child development unfolds in dynamic cultural contexts; detailed examination of contexts that shape children's development within and across cultures, social addresses, and historical eras; foregrounds theories and methods that treat children as meaning makers who actively navigate and transform complex cultural realities.

PSYC 537   Development & Psychopathology   credit: 4 Hours.

Overview of major concepts, issues, and research in the field of developmental psychopathology, which is an interdisciplinary field influenced by psychology, medicine, neuroscience, and other disciplines. Explores youth psychopathology from a developmental perspective, focusing on the intersection between normative and atypical development. Introduces students to assessment and classification, key theories of etiology, and research design issues. Representative disorders will be discussed as examples of how these issues interface with specific types of youth psychopathology. Both pioneering and contemporary research in the field will be covered.

PSYC 538   Intro to Clin-Comm Psych I   credit: 4 Hours.

Part 1 of 4 part sequence designed to provide clinical-community graduate students with a broad overview of theories, approaches, and methods in clinical and community psychology. This set of courses includes coverage of all major domains in clinical-community psychology, including psychopathology/problems in living, clinical-community assessment, diagnosis, effective interventions and their evaluation, and prevention. These courses are also meant to engage graduate students in the process of critical inquiry in clinical-community psychology. Required of all entering graduate students in clinical-community psychology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor required for all students not admitted to graduate program in clinical-community psychology.

PSYC 539   Intro to Clin-Comm Psych II   credit: 4 Hours.

Part 2 of a 4 part sequence designed to provide clinical-community graduate students with a broad overview of theories, approaches, and methods in clinical and community psychology. This set of courses includes coverage of all major domains in clinical-community psychology, including psychopathology/problems in living, clinical-community assessment, diagnosis, effective interventions and their evaluation, and prevention. These courses are also meant to engage graduate students in the process of critical inquiry in clinical-community psychology. Required of all entering graduate students in clinical-community psychology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor required for all students not admitted to graduate program in clinical-community psychology.

PSYC 541   Personality and Behav Dynamics   credit: 2 or 4 Hours.

Theory and research in personality, emphasizing personality as individual differences among persons and personality as attributed to persons by others; explores the measurement, antecedents, and consequences of such differences and attributions. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of psychology.

PSYC 545   Intro to Clin-Comm Psych IV   credit: 4 Hours.

Part 4 of a 4 part sequence designed to provide clinical-community graduate students with a broad overview of theories, approaches, and methods in clinical and community psychology. This set of courses includes coverage of al major domains in clinical-community psychology, including psychopathology/problems in living, clinical-community assessment, diagnosis, effective interventions and their evaluation, and prevention. These courses are also meant to engage graduate students in the process of critical inquiry in clinical-community psychology. Required of all entering graduate students in clinical-community psychology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor required for all students not admitted to graduate program in clinical-community psychology.

PSYC 546   Intervention & Assessment   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

This two-semester course sequence covers research and methods of intervention, prevention, and assessment/diagnosis in clinical and community psychology. Includes scholarly readings and didactic discussions, as well as supervision of applied work in which the students engage. Instruction in ethical standards and professional development is provided. Emphasis is given to empirically-supported assessment, intervention, and supervision in clinical and community psychology. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent registration in PSYC 538, PSYC 539, PSYC 532, or PSYC 545, or consent of instructor.

PSYC 547   Internship   credit: 0 to 16 Hours.

Supervised field experience in clinical psychology. Approved for letter and S/U grading. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PSYC 551   Theory in Social Psychology   credit: 4 Hours.

Overview of the major theoretical perspectives in experimental social psychology, including theories of attitudes, motivation, emotion, interpersonal and intergroup relations, and the self. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PSYC 552   Soc Psych Theory and Meth II   credit: 4 Hours.

Second of a two-course sequence for first-year graduate students in social psychology. Advanced theoretical and research approaches to a broad range of issues in social psychology; participation and seminar presentations by social psychology program faculty. Each student participates in seminar presentations and develops and conducts a research study in conjunction with one or more faculty members. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PSYC 558   Attitudes   credit: 4 Hours.

Intensive analyses of recent developments in attitude theory and research; emphasis on the attitude-behavior relationship; and examination of theories of attitude and attitude change with respect to their utility in predicting and changing social behavior. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PSYC 559   Small Groups   credit: 4 Hours.

Intensive examination of current research and theory on structure, process, and performance of groups; critical examination of recent research and theoretical literature; and development of research designs for related issues in the field. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PSYC 563   ResearchMethods:Clin/CommPsych   credit: 4 Hours.

Examination of research methods and strategies in Clinical and Community Psychology and related fields; issues involved in casual inference from experimental and quasi-experimental designs; qualitative research methods. Prerequisite: PSYC 406.

PSYC 567   Personality Assessment   credit: 4 Hours.

Methods and theory in the quantitative assessment of personality; review of research findings and trends. Same as EPSY 567. Prerequisite: PSYC 407 or equivalent.

PSYC 569   Cognitive Development   credit: 4 Hours.

Intensive examination of current research on infant cognition. Topics include: object segregation, object permanence, physical reasoning, object individuation, number, and psychological reasoning. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PSYC 570   Prin and Meth of Tchg Psych   credit: 0 to 4 Hours.

Designed for graduate students in psychology; areas considered include developing course objectives and content; developing and presenting teaching-learning situations; evaluating the attainment of course objectives; advising and counseling students; ethics in teaching; and research problems on the teaching of psychology. Approved for letter and S/U grading. Prerequisite: Second-year graduate standing in psychology or consent of instructor.

PSYC 573   Clin/Comm: History & Systems   credit: 4 Hours.

One of a series of independent study courses to help Clinical/Community Psychology graduate students develop breadth of knowledge in the broader field of Psychology. Involves an overview of the history and systems of psychological thought and satisfies the breadth requirement in the area. Prerequisite: Before enrolling in this course, students must develop and maintain a portfolio of engagement with the breadth area of History and Systems demonstrating 45 hours effort. Students must first meet with the course instructor to present their portfolio. Instructor approval required. Clinical/Community Psychology graduate students only.

PSYC 574   Microskills & Prof Standards   credit: 2 Hours.

This year-long course covers professional standards and ethics, which emphasizes applied skills for the practice of Clinical and Community Psychology. Students will learn basic skills in rapport-building, including initiating the first contact or session, reflective listening, and paying attention to affect, body language, and interpersonal process in session or interactions. Instruction in professional ethics, supervision, and consultation. Students may practice some of the learned skills by developing relationships with gatekeepers of local organizations and providing consultation and supervision or engaging in collaborations to improve the quality of life of community members. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 4 hours. Prerequisite: Clinical/Community Psychology graduate students only; or consent of instructor.

PSYC 575   Clinical/Community: Diversity   credit: 2 Hours.

Addresses issues of human diversity in the research and applied work of Clinical/Community Psychologists. Diversity is broadly defined and includes attention to, for example: national origin, culture, race, ethnicity, social class, physical ability, cognitive ability, sexual orientation, gender identity, and privilege/oppression. Utilizes both the scholarly literature on diversity, and experiential exercises to develop knowledge and cultural competence. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 4 hours. Prerequisite: Clinical/Community Psychology graduate students only; or consent of instructor.

PSYC 576   Clinical/Community: Biological   credit: 4 Hours.

One of a series of independent study courses to help Clinical/Community Psychology graduate students develop breadth of knowledge in the broader field of Psychology. Involves an overview of the research and theory in the major subdomains within the area of Biological Psychology and satisfies the breadth requirement in the area. Prerequisite: Before enrolling in the course, students must develop and maintain a portfolio of engagement with the breadth area of Biological Psychology demonstrating 45 hours of effort. Students must first meet with the course instructor to present their portfolio. Instructor approval required.

PSYC 577   Clinical/Community:Cog/Affect   credit: 4 Hours.

One of a series of independent study courses to help Clinical/Community Psychology graduate students develop breadth of knowledge in the broader field of Psychology. Involves an overview of the research and theory in the major subdomains within the area of Cognitive/Affective Psychology and satisfies the breadth requirement in the area. Prerequisite: Before enrolling in this course, students must develop and maintain a portfolio of engagement with the breadth area of Cognitive/Affective Psychology demonstrating 45 hours of effort. Students must first meet with the course instructor to present their portfolio. Instructor approval required.

PSYC 578   Clinical/Community:Development   credit: 4 Hours.

One of a series of independent study courses to help Clinical/Community Psychology graduate students develop breadth of knowledge in the broader field of Psychology. Involves an overview of the research and theory in the major subdomains within the area of Developmental Psychology and satisfies the breadth requirement in the area. Prerequisite: Before enrolling in this course, students must develop and maintain a portfolio of engagement with the breadth area of Developmental Psychology demonstrating 45 hours of effort. Students must first meet with the course instructor to present their portfolio. Instructor approval required.

PSYC 579   Clinical/Community: Social   credit: 4 Hours.

One of a series of independent study courses to help Clinical/Community Psychology graduate students develop breadth of knowledge in the broader field of Psychology. Involves an overview of the research and theory in the major subdomains within the area of Social Psychology and satisfies the breadth requirement in the area. Prerequisite: Before enrolling in this course, students must develop and maintain a portfolio of engagement with the breadth area of Social Psychology demonstrating 45 hours of effort. Students must first meet with the course instructor to present their portfolio. Instructor approval required.

PSYC 588   Covar Struct and Factor Models   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduction to covariance structure models, linear structural equations, and factor analysis; identification and parameter estimation problems; assessing goodness-of-fit; use of up-to-date computer software implementing current estimation methods; applications to a wide variety of social and behavioral science modeling problems. Same as EPSY 588, SOC 588, and STAT 588. Prerequisite: PSYC 594, STAT 571, or SOC 587.

PSYC 590   Individual Research   credit: 0 to 16 Hours.

For graduate students who wish to conduct research on special problems not included in graduate theses. Approved for S/U grading only. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PSYC 593   Seminar   credit: 2 or 4 Hours.

Discussion of current topics in their historical setting, with special emphasis on research problems. 2 or 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. May be repeated if topics vary.

PSYC 594   Multivar Anlys in Psych and Ed   credit: 4 Hours.

Examines the principal methods of descriptive and inferential statistics used in the analysis of multiple measurements, emphasizing linear transformations, multiple regression, principal components, multivariate analysis of variance, canonical correlation and variates, discriminant functions and variates, and conventional procedures of factor analysis; involves both theory and applications. Same as EPSY 584 and SOC 584. Prerequisite: PSYC 407 or EPSY 581 or EPSY 582 or consent of instructor.

PSYC 598   Proseminar in Psychology   credit: 0 to 4 Hours.

Weekly presentation and discussions of current research by faculty, graduate students and visiting scholars. Sections of these proseminars are offered by each division in the Psychology Department. Requirements include attendance and participation in discussion. Same as NEUR 598. 0 to 4 graduate hours. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated.

PSYC 599   Thesis Research   credit: 0 to 16 Hours.

Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated.