Media and Cinema Studies (MACS)

MACS Class Schedule

Courses

MACS 100   Intro to Popular TV & Movies   credit: 3 Hours.

The goal of this course is for students to begin to develop a critical understanding of the role of popular movies and television in their own lives and in U.S. culture. The course looks at issues of the relationship of media to social violence, gender identities, sexual identities, adolescents, minority cultures, and the role of the U.S. media globally. It also considers some of the major media genres that characterize U.S. popular television and movies.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Lit & Arts
Cultural Studies - Western

MACS 101   Intro to the Media   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduces students to core issues in communication, ranging from the role of language in human history to political questions posed by electronic and digital technologies. Exploring key contemporary problems through timely readings, students learn and write about how the media affect everyday life. Prerequisite: Freshman or sophomore standing.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Advanced Composition

MACS 104   Intro to Film   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as ENGL 104. See ENGL 104.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Lit & Arts

MACS 117   Shakespeare on Film   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as ENGL 117. See ENGL 117.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Lit & Arts

MACS 166   Contemporary Media Literacy   credit: 3 Hours.

Develops skills to assess the importance of new media in contemporary culture. The course emphasizes both social and technical aspects of media. As part of the course, students prepare their own media and evaluate current media literacy projects. Prerequisite: Freshman or sophomore standing.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

MACS 199   Undergraduate Open Seminar   credit: 1 to 5 Hours.

May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours in separate semesters if topics vary.

MACS 202   Social Aspects Info Tech   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as INFO 202 and IS 202. See INFO 202.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Social & Beh Sci - Soc Sci

MACS 203   Contemporary Movies   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides a critical context for recent international cinema by exploring several kinds of genres, aesthetics, and technologies. We will discuss transnational trends in cinema relating to the influence of other media such as gaming, social networking, and personal electronics, as well as consider impacts of economic structures of global filmmaking production and exhibition. We will view popular and art movies, and query longstanding categories such as the teen pic, "woman's" film, and documentary.

MACS 205   Introduction to Documentary   credit: 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to one of the fastest growing areas in media today: the documentary. It's designed for students who want to expand their knowledge and appreciation of documentaries in all their forms. Using weekly in-class screenings, discussion, readings, ad writing, students will examine a wide variety of documentaries, looking at their styles, purposes, and storytelling "voices", as well as learning the language and other fundamentals of documentary. We will also cover some of the basic methods involved in planning and creating a documentary. Please note: this is NOT a hands-on production course. Prerequisite: Sophmore standing or above required.

MACS 207   Indian Cinema in Context   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as CWL 207. See CWL 207.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Lit & Arts
Cultural Studies - Non-West

MACS 211   Intro to African-American Film   credit: 3 Hours.

Examination of the history, theory, and aesthetics of African-American filmmaking from the silent era to the present. Films are analyzed within their sociocultural contexts, with particular attention to how constructions of race, identity, and community interact with class, gender, and sexuality; and the link between film and other forms of Black expressive culture. The impact of African-American film on popular culture, links to the African Diaspora, and relations with other communities of color will also be discussed. Same as AFRO 211.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - US Minority

MACS 224   Sportsmedia Technology & Culture   credit: 3 Hours.

This course is designed for students who are curious about (a) how new technologies are changing sportsmedia cultures, and (b) the kinds of knowledges and skills needed to effectively engage with this powerful cultural and economic industry. We'll use four primary focal points (ESPN, Sport Fandom, Action-Sports, Data Production / Smart Stadiums) to help us understand today's sportsmedia cultural industry's challenges and possibilities, and the kinds of challenges and possibilities that the sportsmedia cultural industry creates for society. We'll also use our course focal points and related industry websites to concretize the key concepts (drawn from theoretical readings and applied studies in media studies, sociology, sport studies, and technology studies).

MACS 250   Latina/os on the Bronze Screen   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as LLS 250. See LLS 250.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Lit & Arts
Cultural Studies - US Minority

MACS 261   Survey of World Cinema I   credit: 3 Hours.

Survey of the development of equipment, techniques, and themes of the cinema from its origins through the coming of sound; lectures, discussions, and showings of selected films.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Lit & Arts

MACS 262   Survey of World Cinema II   credit: 3 Hours.

Survey of the development of equipment, techniques, and themes of the cinema from the coming of sound to the present; lectures, discussions, and showings of selected films.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Lit & Arts

MACS 264   Creative and Information Economies   credit: 4 Hours.

An introduction to the political economy of the media in the U.S. The purpose of the class is to acquaint students with a core understanding of how the media system operates, and with what effects, in a capitalist society. The course examines the role of advertising, public relations, corporate concentration, and government regulation upon journalism, entertainment, culture, and participatory democracy. The class also examines issues such as the Internet, globalization, and public broadcasting.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Hist & Phil
Cultural Studies - Western

MACS 275   Am Indian and Indigenous Film   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as AIS 275 and ENGL 275. See AIS 275.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Humanities - Lit & Arts
Cultural Studies - US Minority

MACS 295   Intro Media/Cinema Topics   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to the study of special topics in media and cinema studies, including cultural, social, historical, economic, and/or political issues in media and/or cinema. Topics vary but may include: genres, stars, historical movements, thematic studies, television, convergence culture, new media. May be repeated in the same or separate terms to a maximum of 6 hours if topics vary.

MACS 317   Media History   credit: 3 Hours.

Presents the nature and development of communication systems; history of communication media; history of journalism, advertising, and broadcasting; and communications in the modern world.

MACS 320   Popular Culture   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the critical literature on mass media entertainment; reviews significant contemporary issues and develops perspectives for understanding popular culture.

MACS 321   Film Culture   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduces students to key issues of, major theoretical approaches to, and current debates about the cultural function of films. Course addresses theories of spectatorship, the politics of pleasure, the culture of entertainment, and the cinematic construction of race, class, and gender.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Western

MACS 323   Studies Film/Media Production   credit: 1 to 3 Hours.

Provides analytical framework for pursuing film/media production. Emphasizes critical analysis of various aspects of production: e.g., scriptwriting, storyboarding, cinematography, editing, set and costume design, location and studio shooting, sound. Covers theories of representation, narrative, meaning-making, experimentation, and audience in relation to film/media production practices. Does not, however, teach students how to do film and media production (e.g., how to work a camera, etc.). Therefore, students must come to the course with experience in film and/or media production (can be self-taught). Both individual and group projects are encouraged. Students should expect to work as crew for other students in class. Culminates in a public screening at which students present an analysis of their own project--both the process and the finished product. To apply for course, students (individually or in groups) must propose an idea or concept for a film/media project they would like to produce during the class. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 6 hours. May be repeated by students who wish to pursue a longer project in two consecutive semesters (may include summer). Students may not repeat the course to pursue separate projects. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MACS 326   New Media, Culture & Society   credit: 3 Hours.

Digital media is an immensely pervasive and powerful form of communication that despite its rapid growth has yet to reach most of the world's population. This lecture-based survey course for undergraduates traces the history and formation of personal computing and the Internet, the development of virtual communities and virtual worlds, evolving forms of digital representation and communication, digital visual cultures, features of new media industries, and the rise of participatory media. Evaluation and assessment is based on written exams, quizzes, class discussion in section, and practice-based assignments using new media technologies such as wikis, blogs, games, and digital video. Emphasis is on mastering key concepts of digital media through theory and history, and on critical discussion of distinctive features of digital media objects. Lectures and discussion sections are held in computer-equipped classrooms. Same as INFO 326.

MACS 331   Media and Democracy   credit: 3 Hours.

Studies the philosophical bases of the functions and the responsibilities of mass communications.

MACS 351   Social Aspects of Media   credit: 3 Hours.

Explores media structures in relation to cultural content and social functions; examines problems of life and society as treated in mass-produced communications. Same as SOC 351.

MACS 356   Sex & Gender in Popular Media   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the notion that the mass media influence our development as gendered individuals, looking at those who argue for and against this notion. Considers different forms of feminist theory applied to the study of mass media, the history and scholarly criticisms of the media and their portrayal of women, and feminist attempts to create alternatives to mainstream media images. Throughout, the course considers representation of minorities in the dominant media and examines newly created alternative representations. Same as GWS 356.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Cultural Studies - Western

MACS 361   Film Theory and Criticism   credit: 3 Hours.

Study of major aesthetic and critical theories about film; study of theory and practice of film criticism.

MACS 364   Topics in Media Business   credit: 3 Hours.

Addresses the business, industry, and economic implications of the interaction of Internet, television, radio, film, and print outlets through digitization-driven platform and interactive technologies. Explores historical and emergent business models, ownership and work patterns, and investment arrangement related to media convergence. Investigates novel forms of individual and collective labor structures and globally distributed modes of production and consumption. Includes attention to economic and scholarly models seeking to analyze media business structures. Specific topics vary by semester, but may include Google, Disney, and Hollywood studio system, or activist media organizations. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours if topics vary.

MACS 375   Latina/o Media in the US   credit: 3 Hours.

Examines the portrayal and participation of Latinas and Latinos in the U.S. media using a variety of interdisciplinary approaches. Addresses historical and political movements that have been critical to Latina/Latino print, broadcast, and electronic communication within the broader context of cultural diversity. Same as LLS 375.

MACS 377   Global Communications   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the multiple dimensions of cross-national and comparative communications. Specific topics will vary according to instructor's focus, but may include human dimensions of global communication, intercultural communication, media impact, structure and processes of institutional communication (i.e. propaganda, diplomacy).

MACS 389   International Communications   credit: 3 Hours.

Provides an interdisciplinary approach to international communications; its structure and content; the role of international communications in conflict and conflict resolution; the semantics of international communication; the technical and economic aspects of international mass communications; and government-industry relations in communications. Same as PS 389.

MACS 391   Individual Study   credit: 0 to 3 Hours.

Individual research and exploration of media and cinema studies topics under the guidance of a faculty advisor. May be repeated in the same or in multiple semesters, if topics vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MACS 395   Special Media/Cinema Topics   credit: 3 Hours.

Cultural, social, historical, economic, and/or political issues in media and/or cinema; topics vary but may include: genres, historical movements, thematic studies, television, convergence culture, new media. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours if topics vary.

MACS 408   TV Studies   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examines factors reshaping TV and its relationship to culture, including genres, industry practices (advertising, production, distribution), new media technologies (YouTube, Twitter, and newer developments), and computer gaming. Analyzes places/spaces of television, mobility, surveillance, television as instruction/guide (dating, cooking, fashion), citizenship, consumption, and TV in everyday life. Focuses on contemporary aspects of TV, with some attention to earlier forms and practices of television. Students required to view and analyze some television programs outside of class. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

MACS 410   Media Ethics   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Surveys the major ethical problems in news, advertising, publications and entertainment media; includes case studies and moral reasoning on confidentiality, privacy, conflicts of interest, deception, violence, and pornography. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

MACS 464   Film Festivals   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examines the history and significance of film festivals: What they mean for the film industry (marketing, distribution, production), audiences (both at the festival and beyond), film history, and the evolution of filmmaking. Covers specific local, national, and international festivals including festivals focused on particular issues (e.g., Chicago International Children's Film Festival, San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival, Miami Gay and Lesbian Film Festival, and our own local IUB 48-Hour Film Contest). Coordinated with Roger Ebert's Film Festival (which is held in Champaign every April) including internship/volunteer opportunities, screenings, and meetings with guests. Class culminates with a UIUC student film festival, organized, judged, and sponsored by the class. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

MACS 466   Japanese Cinema   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examines the influence of Japan's traditional aesthetics on its cinema and surveys its major film movements, genres, and directors. Same as EALC 466. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: One course in the College of Media or East Asian Languages and Cultures, or consent of instructor.

MACS 495   Internship Seminar   credit: 0 to 1 Hours.

Seminar based on internship experience. Offered for College of Media students who complete an approved internship. 0 to 1 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated in the same term to a maximum of 2 undergraduate hours. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 3 undergraduate hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MACS 496   Advanced Media/Cinema Topics   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Advanced study of cultural, social, historical, economic, and/or political issues in media and/or cinema; topics vary but may include national and transnational cinemas, directors, genres, historical movements, social and political movements, thematic studies, television, convergence culture, new media. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated in the same or separate terms to a maximum of 6 undergraduate hours or 8 graduate hours as topics vary. Prerequisite: One College of Media course or consent of instructor.

MACS 498   Senior Seminar   credit: 3 Hours.

Seminar and tutorial in selected Media and Cinema Studies topics. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated in the same or subsequent semesters to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing, a declared Media and Cinema Studies major, or consent of instructor.

MACS 499   Senior Thesis   credit: 3 Hours.

Individual research for majors in Media and Cinema Studies leading to the completion of a thesis. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing, a declared Media and Cinema Studies Major, and consent of advisor.

MACS 503   Historiography of Cinema   credit: 4 Hours.

Seminar on historical perspectives on cinema as an institution, a body of signifying practices, a product to be consumed, a phenomenon of modernity, and a cultural artifact, and on cinema in relation to other screen media. Same as CWL 503 and ENGL 503.

MACS 504   Theories of Cinema   credit: 4 Hours.

Seminar on influential theories and accompanying debates about the textual/extra-textual mechanisms and cultural/political impact of cinema and related screen media. Same as CWL 504 and ENGL 504.