Educational Psychology (EPSY)

EPSY Class Schedule

Courses

EPSY 199   Undergraduate Open Seminar   credit: 1 to 5 Hours.

Approved for both letter and S/U grading. May be repeated.

EPSY 200   Honors Symposium in Education   credit: 1 Hour.

Course affords students an opportunity to consider important topics impacting current educational practices. Students select six scholarly presentations from an approved list. The presentations are delivered by outstanding visiting and resident scholars in education and related disciplines. Three times during the term, students gather to consider the issues raised by the presentations. Course expectations include: attending six presentations, attending the three course discussion meetings, reading the course text and selected publications, and developing written reflections based on presentations attended. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours.

EPSY 201   Educational Psychology   credit: 3 Hours.

Explores fundamental issues of development, learning, instruction, and assessment. This course articulates how people learn, how they are influenced by cultural and social contexts, how to assess learning and its outcomes, and how best to teach and motivate people to achieve. Educational psychologists improve learning in a broad range of settings: homes, classrooms, work environments, and communities. Prerequisite: PSYC 100.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Behavioral Sciences

EPSY 202   Exploring Cultural Diversity   credit: 3 Hours.

Introduction to cultural diversity and social justice issues through interdisciplinary readings, discussion, and experiential activities. The course involves a 1-hour lecture and 2-hour lab/discussion section each week. The lecture focus is on raising awareness of key issues, concerns and concepts, providing accurate information on diverse groups, and relating theories and models to critical incidents of social oppression in everyday life. The lab/discussion sections follow a group dialogue and experiential activity format, and focus on relating the readings and lecture material to personal experiences and active learning activities.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: US Minority Culture(s)

EPSY 203   Social Issues Group Dialogues   credit: 1 Hour.

Provides students with opportunities to converse on specific diversity and social justice topic areas offered as separate sections under the course heading. Each section uses a structured dialogue format to explore intergroup and intragroup differences and similarities within historical and contemporary contexts. Specific focus will be on participants sharing their experiences and perspectives related to the specific dialogue topic. The dialogue format uses active learning exercises in addition to weekly readings, journal assignments, and topic based dialogues. May be repeated in the same term to a maximum of 2 hours. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

EPSY 204   Learning in a Digital World   credit: 3 Hours.

Addresses the fundamental use of information and information technology in knowledge creation and learning, with a specific focus on the use of computers, new media, and related digital technologies within formal and informal learning environments. The paramount goal is the reconceptualization of learning practices and environments and how these will impact students, teachers, schools, and society at large. Major areas of interest covered include new learning theories, educational informatics, ubiquitous learning, collective intelligence and social networking, creativity, and universal design for knowledge creation. Applicable to any student interested in the principles of learning, knowledge, and education. Students will need access to a laptop computer.

EPSY 220   Career Theory and Practice   credit: 3 Hours.

Various behavioral science theories will be covered (e.g., person-environment interaction, decision-making, group dynamics, stereotype threat, personality traits). Discussions of research findings to applied career practices will also be included. Students will develop a working-knowledge of these theories through interactive lectures, guided class discussions, case-based readings, and group activities that require them to think critically and flexibly about theory in order to generate solutions for real-world problems. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. On request, students will be required to participate in a total of 6 hours of experiments outside of class.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Behavioral Sciences

EPSY 222   Language & Culture of Deaf Communities   credit: 3 Hours.

Same as SHS 222. See SHS 222.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Social Sciences
UIUC: US Minority Culture(s)

EPSY 236   Child Dev in Education   credit: 3 Hours.

Study of child growth and development designed particularly for those preparing to teach in the elementary school; special emphasis on the significance of the developmental process for educational programs and procedures; and systematic experience in studying and evaluating children's behavior and in supporting their learning and development. Includes limited voluntary participation as a subject in experiments. Credit is not given for both EPSY 236 and PSYC 216. Prerequisite: PSYC 100.

EPSY 280   Elements of Statistics   credit: 4 Hours.

Course content includes descriptive statistics, correlation, regression, the normal curve, statistical interference, and the presentation of statistics. The course does not require calculus, and makes use of examples drawn from education, medicine, social science, business, and the popular media. Designed for professional training of students whose major interests are not in math or science. Credit is not given for both EPSY 280 and any of ACE 261, CPSC 440, ECON 202, ECON 203, EPSY 480, PSYC 235, SOC 280, STAT 100. Prerequisite: MATH 112.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
UIUC: Quant Reasoning I

EPSY 395   Independent Study   credit: 1 to 4 Hours.

Study of problems not considered in other courses; designed for students who excel in self-direction and intellectual curiosity. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Minimum GPA of 3.5; demonstrated writing and research potential as evaluated by advisor, and consent of advisor and consent of staff member who supervises the work.

EPSY 398   Thesis   credit: 2 or 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

EPSY 399   Thesis   credit: 2 Hours.

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

EPSY 400   Psyc of Learning in Education   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

Study of the psychology of human learning as it applies to instruction, educational issues, and educational problems. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours. Taking 4 credit hours requires consent of the instructor and the completion of a substantive scholarly project. Undergraduate and graduate work load will be commensurate with the requirements. 2 hours for Latin and Spanish Certification, Elementary Edm Music and GSLIS. Prerequisite: EPSY 201 or equivalent.

EPSY 401   Child Language and Education   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

Provides an overview of current knowledge about children's acquisition of linguistic and communicative competence together with a consideration of the educational import of this developmental process. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours. Taking 4 hours of credit requires consent of the instructor and completion of a substantive scholarly project. Undergraduate and graduate work load will be commensurate with the requirements. 3 hours of ECE Undergraduate certification and 2 hours for ECE graduate certification, Elementary Ed, Music certification and GSLIS. Prerequisite: EPSY 201 or EPSY 236; or equivalent.

EPSY 402   Sociocultural Infl on Learning   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

Provides a general overview of the relationship of language, culture, and society to the teaching-learning process; gives broad exposure to research and theory concerned with the effects of sociocultural factors on cognition, perception, and motivation; also considers the effects of such factors on classroom interaction. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours. Taking 4 hours of credit requires consent of the instructor and the completion of a substantive scholarly project. 2 hours for Elementary Education and Music certification. Prerequisite: EPSY 201 or EPSY 236; or equivalent.

EPSY 403   Res Methods in Learning Scienc   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

This course is an introduction to conducting research in the learning sciences, including how to use theory as a guide to conducting literature reviews and formulating research questions. The course introduces quantitative and qualitative research design, data collection and analysis, and other aspects of research relevant to learning, teaching, and other topics relevant to education. A secondary goal is to better understand research reported in the primary literature as well as in the news media. Assignments will include evaluating research papers and writing a research proposal. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: EPSY 280 or EPSY 480 or PSYC 235 or PSYC 301.

EPSY 404   Adjustment in School Settings   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Examines theories of adjustment, factors that influence adjustment, and common adjustment problems of children and adolescents in school context. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: EPSY 201 or equivalent.

EPSY 406   Psyc of Classroom Management   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

General overview of theories related to analyzing student behaviors in the classroom; the incidence and etiology of conduct problems and behavior disorders in the classroom, with emphasis upon preventive strategies and guiding principles for maintaining classroom discipline. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours. Taking 4 hours of credit requires consent of the instructor and the completion of a substantive scholarly project. Undergraduate and Graduate work load will be commensurate with the requirements. 2 hours for Elementary Education and Music certification and GSLIS. Prerequisite: EPSY 201 or EPSY 236, or equivalent.

EPSY 407   Adult Learning and Development   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Theory of and research on adult learning and development; includes societal context, performance, physiology and health, personality, and learning; and considers stability and change during young adulthood, middle age, and old age. Meets both foundational requirements for EPSY. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Assignments and work load will commensurate with credit. Prerequisite: EPSY 201, or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

EPSY 408   Learning & Hum Dev w/ EdTech   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Sets out to provide an understanding of theories of learning and development and how these theories relate to educational technology. It has two components. The first is theoretical, in which we attempt to develop an overall frame of reference, locating approaches to the psychology of learning in terms of large paradigm shifts, from 'behaviorism' to 'brain developmentalism' to 'social cognitivism'. The second component is practical, in which we will use these theoretical concepts to 'parse' a technology-mediated learning environment for its underlying presuppositions. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

EPSY 413   Intelligence Assess and Theory   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Study of fundamental concepts relevant to the general problem of the individual testing of learning aptitude; acquisition of psychometric competence in the use of the Binet and the Wechsler tests; acquaintance and limited practice in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of results obtained by performance scales and other devices appropriate for use with individuals having sensory, associative, and/or motor impairments. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and 6 hours of psychology courses, including SPED 424 or PSYC 490.

EPSY 419   Counseling Pre-Practicum   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

Study of basic helping skills and professional ethics in professional psychology. The course links theory with practice, as students engage in the exploration of new helping skills and learn to analyze their developing counseling style and performance; includes an examination of relevant ethical standards and counseling theories, and their application in a multicultural context. Discussion and experiential activities are supplemented by films, videotapes, and case studies. Primarily for counseling psychology graduate students, though other students in programs with a mental health focus may be admitted with the consent of the instructor if space is available. Same as REHB 419. 2 to 4 undergraduate hours. 2 to 4 graduate hours. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

EPSY 420   Theories of Psychotherapy   credit: 4 Hours.

Study of counseling and psychotherapeutic processes and theories. Coverage of major models and theories as well as current trends and a review of counseling skills will be included. Same as PSYC 420. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 238 or equivalent.

EPSY 421   Sex Role Theory in Counseling   credit: 4 Hours.

Reviews research on sex role socialization related to career, family, and personal roles for both sexes; discusses counseling strategies aimed at freeing persons from attitudes and behaviors that limit their freedom to choose; and reviews strategies for change at policy, agency and individual levels. Same as GWS 421. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

EPSY 427   Learning from Text   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

This course will survey the range of topics related to how we learn from text, i.e., from reading. The course will focus on reading in education settings and approaches to improving reading comprehension. Students will read secondary and primary literature and have opportunities to critique, discuss, and present the findings of this research. Topics discussed will include: eye movements during reading, grammatical structures and discourse conventions of texts that support comprehension, and how comprehension and memory for text can be measured. Assignments will include written reviews of texts and topics. Students taking the course for 4 graduate hours will also plan and present a proposed empirical study related to some topic within the course. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours. Credit is not given for EPSY 427 if credit has been received for either PSYC 425 or LING 425.

EPSY 430   Early Adolescent Development   credit: 3 OR 4 Hours.

Examines early adolescent development, covering biological, cognitive, and social transitions. Topics include identity, autonomy, peer and family relationships and the role of schooling and the media. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours.

EPSY 431   Cognitive Dev in Educ Context   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to cover basic issues in cognitive development, review relevant research findings, and to situate these and understand these in educational contexts. Most of our attention will focus on child and adolescent development. We will address questions such as: How do children learn new concepts? How do changes in children's thinking occur? How can we use what we know to produce positive impacts on children's learning and well-being? 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

EPSY 456   Human Performance and Cognition in Context   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Theories and findings from cognitive science and related disciplines concerning human information processing mechanisms and capacities are covered, with an emphasis on how understanding people's perceptual and cognitive strengths and limitations can inform decisions about teaching/training strategies and designing technological environments to suit people's needs and abilities. Same as IE 445 and PSYC 456. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or PSYC 103 or consent of instructor.

EPSY 457   Teachers and Tech Integration   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Designed to help enhance the understanding of computers in the schools. This course looks at computers in the broadest sense and considers a variety of aspects of technologies and digital media that impact pedagogy, curriculum, and student learning. The course considers the context of computing by exploring the history of computing, what is currently occurring in the schools, and how technologies and student expectations are encouraging teachers to redefine the classroom experience. The main goal of this course is to enable students to develop a flexible and working knowledge of computers as educational resources in order to better reach students - students of the 21st century. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: EPSY 480 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

EPSY 470   Intro to Evaluation Theory   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduction to the major conceptual constructs and theories of evaluation; emphasis on the critical defining components of evaluation, particularly its role in program and policy development, and on critical distinctions among evaluation theories; provides grounding for further study of both evaluation theory and methods. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

EPSY 471   Intro to Evaluation Methods   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduces the methodology of educational and social program evaluation, including the design of an evaluation, the data collection and analysis, and reporting; emphasis on negotiating the unique facets of evaluative practice, notably evaluator role, working with clients and other stakeholders, the political dynamics of evaluation contexts, and utilization of evaluative results. Students collectively conduct a field-based evaluation project. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: EPSY 480.

EPSY 474   Evaluating Learning Technology   credit: 4 Hours.

In this course, students will learn to conduct a variety of evaluations related to learning technologies including needs assessments, consumer-driven evaluations, outcome or impact assessments, comparative or quasi-experimental studies and case studies. As one means of measuring need, growth, or impact, students will also create assessment instruments and strategies related to particular learning technologies. These might include electronic portfolios, web-based surveys, computer adapted tests or performance rubrics. Course requirements include a final evaluation project in which students (individuals or pre-approved small groups) plan and conduct actual evaluations of learning technologies. The course includes both face-to-face and asynchronous and synchronous on-line meetings. Same as HRD 474. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

EPSY 480   Educational Statistics   credit: 4 Hours.

Designed for terminal value for professional training of students not intending to pursue advanced graduate work, and for introductory value for students continuing graduate study in education; descriptive statistics, introduction to correlation and regression, the normal curve, statistical inference, and the presentation and interpretation of statistical data in educational literature. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

EPSY 485   Assessing Student Performance   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Designed especially for secondary education students, this course introduces basic concepts and practices of assessment, measurement, and evaluation as they are used in school settings. The course covers current trends and issues in assessment including large scale standardized testing practices and cultural issues in assessment. Students become familiar with using assessment and evaluation data to inform instructional decisions. Same as CI 485. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Students should be concurrently enrolled in CI 403. Admission to the secondary teacher education program.

EPSY 486   Principles of Measurement   credit: 3 or 4 Hours.

Study of the selection, preparation, administration, and interpretation of psychological and educational tests and diagnostic devices; emphasis on theory at a beginning level, with application to hypothetical school situations as a teaching device; and consideration of the sources of standard tests, criteria for their evaluation, methods of scoring, interpretation, and general and special areas. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: EPSY 201 or EPSY 236.

EPSY 490   Developments in Educ Psyc   credit: 2 to 4 Hours.

Foundational theories and practices of educational psychology, including learning and development. 2 or 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours. Approved for letter and S/U grading. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours. Undergraduate and graduate work load will be commensurate with the requirements.

EPSY 491   Educ Psyc Field Instruction   credit: 4 to 16 Hours.

Individual instruction designed to help the advanced student apply basic principles of education or psychology in institutional settings. Each student is assigned to a school, community agency, or other applied settings for a supervised field experience in some aspect of educational psychology. 4 to 16 undergraduate hours. 4 to 16 graduate hours. Approved for letter and S/U grading. May be repeated to a maximum of 16 hours if topics vary; no more than 8 hours may be taken in any given term. Prerequisite: Master's degree in educational psychology or equivalent, and consent of instructor.

EPSY 492   History and Systems of Psych   credit: 4 Hours.

A seminar on the history of psychology within a social and cultural context and its theoretical systems, and their relations to contemporary psychology. An awareness of the roots and context of one's own views as well as understanding and appreciation of others' views will be fostered. There will be some focus on encouraging self-study of the history of one's own theoretical orientation. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: EPSY 420, or equivalent.

EPSY 501   Evaluation in Society   credit: 4 Hours.

Examines evaluation as a social practice, explains various approaches to evaluation both nationally and internationally, and explores how evaluation is linked to policy and decision making. Students will read about and discuss both foundational and contemporary issues in evaluation practice and theory as they relate to the use of evaluation in improving both practice and policy decisions. For graduate students in education, public policy, social work, community health, and other related fields.

EPSY 505   Data, Evidence, & Decisions   credit: 4 Hours.

Examines how practitioners and policy makers come to interpret sources of evidence; how the use of data, information, and evidence are shaped by organizational structures, routines, and cultures; how technical infrastructures have emerged to enable the collection, distribution, consolidation, and use of data, information, and evidence; the political economy of generated and using evidence (e.g., university research, think tanks, advocacy organizations, etc.). This multidisciplinary course is situated against the broad backdrop of the social science literature on social scientific knowledge production and use, and the relationship between science and society.

EPSY 507   Econ Analysis & Ed Policy   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduces key economic principles and applies them to the analysis of current education policy issues. Concepts covered include supply and demand, competitive markets, human capital acquisition, efficiency, equity and the role of government intervention, among others. Focuses on applications within the context of policy making in education. Designed for students without prior coursework in economics, but with a working basic knowledge of statistics (e.g., regression). Prerequisite: EPSY 480.

EPSY 508   Display/Interpretation of Data   credit: 4 Hours.

Provides instruction in representing and communicating data accurately and clearly using visual displays (e.g., graphs, tables and figures). Examines the most appropriate ways to visually display the results of data analyses so that they are clear, accurate and unambiguous. Drawing on both contemporary techniques and publication standards, it will address topics including audience, context, precision, visual metaphor, data display tools and best practices.

EPSY 510   Counseling Psych/Ethics ProSem   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduction to and critical examination of applied issues within the discipline of counseling psychology. A review of (a) the historical development of counseling psychology, (b) psychologists' professional code of ethics, and (c) major psychotherapy theories and interventions. Issues of race, class, gender, and diversity more broadly are integrated throughout the course.

EPSY 511   Voc Psych Theories and Assess   credit: 2 or 4 Hours.

Study of vocational psychology theories, assessment, decision-making, and the job search process; includes an historical overview of the development field. The course links theory with practice, as students engage in the interpretation of vocational assessments, examine relevant ethical standards, and discuss their application. 2 hours credit is for work on either the vocational theories or vocational assessment parts of the course (this must be negotiated). For 4 hours credit, a student must do both aspects. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in counseling psychology or consent of instructor.

EPSY 513   Resrch Meth in Coun Psych II   credit: 4 Hours.

This course is the second course sequence for Counseling Psychology graduate students. This course builds on the previous course (EPSY 512) in that students continue work on refining their thesis proposal in the area of Counseling Psychology. They also explore advanced research designs as applied to Counseling Psychology literature. This course may not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: EPSY 512 or consent of instructor.

EPSY 515   Multicultural Counseling   credit: 4 Hours.

Overview of multicultural counseling theory, empirical research, and practice; includes didactic as well as experiential learning components. The goal of the course is to enhance students' multicultural counseling competencies, with regard to developing: (a) appropriate knowledge of specific cultural groups and sociopolitical issues, (b) cultural self-awareness, and (c) multiculturally relevant intervention skills. May not be repeated for credit.

EPSY 520   Counseling Psych Practicum   credit: 2 to 8 Hours.

Intensive supervised experiences in applied educational psychology; use of a wide variety of diagnostic and observational techniques and treatment. Students may take more than one section. Approved for letter and S/U grading. Prerequisite: Master's degree in educational psychology or equivalent; consent of instructor.

EPSY 521   Group Counseling   credit: 4 Hours.

Study of the principles of group process and their application in institutional and other settings; includes a review of the historical development of group processes and study of pertinent research; discussion and experiential activities are supplemented by films, videotapes, and case studies. Prerequisite: EPSY 510 or consent of instructor.

EPSY 530   Social Development   credit: 4 Hours.

This seminar is an advanced, doctoral-level survey of social development from infancy to adolescence. The range of topics includes attachment, temperament, genes and developmental process, social contexts of cognitive development gender development, moral reasoning and prosocial behavior, aggressive behavior, and the development of ethnic identity and discrimination. Family, peer, community, and cultural ecologies of children and adolescents receive extensive consideration. Developmental theory, methodology, and relations to social policy and intervention are continuing concerns. Same as PSYC 540.

EPSY 531   Cognitive Dev and Socializatn   credit: 4 Hours.

Addresses basic issues in cognitive development, with special attention to how social interactions impact cognitive development. Two major foci: theories, especially in terms of the role that socialization plays in these theories; and effects of domains of socialization (e.g., peers, school) on cognitive development. Primary age span: preschool thru adolescence. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

EPSY 540   Networks for Learning   credit: 4 Hours.

In this course students engage in hands on activities through which they come to understand the intricacies of building substantial and sustainable networks for learning environments, in particular network planning for school districts. Studies read and discuss literature that relates to the building of network systems. Students will explore various tools and techniques that best serve the network environment. Students will complete a major project in which they design (or modify) their own network and discuss the means by which they come to understand critical factors associated with maintaining and growing such an environment. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Educational Technology for Teaching, Learning, and Leadership concentration in the Educational Psychology on-line CTER Program.

EPSY 552   Classroom Learning   credit: 4 Hours.

Provides a broad picture of the nature and conditions of classroom learning. Considers analysis of knowledge; institutional constraints on teachers; characteristics of instruction and instructional materials for reading, social studies, and science; social context of learning; motivation and interest; questioning and discussion; and learning strategies and study skills. Intended for doctoral students with a special interest in research leading to the improvement of classroom teaching and learning. Same as PSYC 554. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor required.

EPSY 554   Virtual Worlds in Education   credit: 4 Hours.

Examines the history, theory, and practice of pedagogy in virtual environments. Students will read research literature, participate in online discussions through the Moodle course management system, and engage in real-time activities in several types of virtual worlds. The project component requires students to develop educational artifacts in virtual worlds and perform peer review of artifacts developed by other students. Projects will support some aspect of learning or teaching in the students' own workplace, and will incorporate multimedia, web, and other network-based resources. Students are expected to have access to computers that meet the hardware and networking requirements. Same as CI 545. Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in the Educational Technology for Teaching, Learning, and Leadership concentration in the Educational Psychology on-line CTER Program.

EPSY 556   Analysis of Educational Tech   credit: 4 Hours.

This course will analyze currently available technologies for learning. Areas addressed include: learning management systems, intelligent tutors, computer adaptive testing, gamification, simulations, learning in and through social media and peer interaction, universal design for learning, differentiated instruction systems, big data and learning analytics, attention monitoring, and affect-aware systems. Participants will explore the processes for selection and implementation of suitable technologies, the design of electronic learning resources, design and application of digital media in teaching and learning, familiarization with web usually and accessibility, and critical analysis of the benefits of technologies in education. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit.

EPSY 559   Advanced Learning Technologies   credit: 4 Hours.

In this course students identify, select, and justify the implementation of advanced learning technologies in the overall learning environment. Students will consider how advanced technologies influence the design process and how the design process may be enhanced through the use of advanced learning technologies. The goal of this course is to have students create a vision in which instructional system design models, existing advanced learning technologies, and the learning environment create a synergy by which individuals are able to solve organizational problems. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Educational Technology for Teaching, Learning, and Leadership concentration in the Educational Psychology on-line CTER Program.

EPSY 560   Tech & Educational Change   credit: 4 Hours.

An in-depth look at research on educational reform and its links to technology in the United States. Major topics include reforming the organization of schools and the instructional program, and the roles students, teachers, and school administrators play when integrating technology and school improvement. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Educational Technology for Teaching, Learning, and Leadership concentration in the Educational Psychology on-line CTER Program.

EPSY 570   Adv Theories of Ed Evaluation   credit: 4 Hours.

This topical seminar is designed for advanced graduate students with a significant interest in the evaluation of educational and social policies and programs. The seminar will engage in some depth an issue of contemporary currency and controversy in evaluation theory and practice. Readings, discussions, guest speakers, and the occasional field trip will frame the seminar. Each student in this seminar will be expected to develop a scholarly paper for conference presentation and/or publication. Prerequisite: EPSY 470, EPSY 471, and coursework in research methods.

EPSY 574   Quasi-Experimental Design   credit: 4 Hours.

Intermediate course for graduate students in education and related fields. Goal is to prepare students to design and conduct quasi-experimental studies and critique the work of others in an informed, systematic way. Students will read and discuss foundational and contemporary issues in design, validity, sampling and loss, regression artifacts, analysis and causal inferences. Prerequisite: EPSY 580 or equivalent.

EPSY 575   Mixed Method Inquiry   credit: 4 Hours.

This advanced course addresses the theory and practice of mixing inquiry methodologies in program evaluation and applied research. Topics include selected roots of mixed inquiry, various stances on mixing philosophical traditions while mixing methods, conceptualizations of mixed method design and analysis, and challenges of mixed method practice. Students should have basic familiarity with experimental or survey (quantitative) with and constructivist or interpretivist (qualitative) social science. Familiarity with other social science frameworks (e.g., critical theory, feminism, action science) is also highly desirable. Approved for letter and S/U grading. Prerequisite: EPSY 574 or EPSY 580; EPSY 577 or EPSY 578; or equivalents; or consent of instructor.

EPSY 577   Foundations of Qual Methods   credit: 4 Hours.

Introduction to epistemological, methodological, ethical, and political issues characterizing the broad field of qualitative inquiry. Topics covered include an overview of logical positivism and logical empiricism; the Continental philosophers' critique of scientism and the emergence of hermeneutics; sociological theories of Verstehen; interpretive anthropology; feminist qualitative inquiry; social constructionism; contemporary crises of ethics, representation, and justification.

EPSY 578   Qualitative Inquiry Methods   credit: 4 Hours.

Introductory course addressing the practice of qualitative inquiry. Topics include developing inquiry questions appropriate for qualitative studies; designing qualitative studies; generating data via interviews, observations, document analyses; analyzing and interpreting qualitative data; judging the quality of inquiry; representing and reporting qualitative inquiry; addressing ethical and political issues in the conduct of qualitative inquiry.

EPSY 580   Statistical Inference in Educ   credit: 4 Hours.

Intermediate statistical methods in education; includes probability theory, distribution theory, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlational analysis, and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: EPSY 480 or equivalent.

EPSY 581   Applied Regression Analysis   credit: 4 Hours.

Emphasis on educational research applications of regression with special emphasis placed on application and interpretation of techniques. Topics covered include rudimentary linear algebra, the general linear model, different coding schemes, regression diagnostics, and extensions to binary data and nested data structures. Same as PSYC 581. Prerequisite: EPSY 580 or equivalent; consent of instructor.

EPSY 582   Advanced Statistical Methods   credit: 4 Hours.

Advanced topics in analyses of variance and covariance, and principles of experimental design; brief introduction to multivariate analysis, including rudiments of matrix algebra. Prerequisite: EPSY 580, PSYC 407, or equivalent.

EPSY 585   Theories of Measurement I   credit: 4 Hours.

Provides a conceptual framework of classical test theory (e.g., true scores, error of measurement, composite measures) and alternatives to the classical model (e.g., generalizability theory, latent trait theory). Students will learn the techniques and theory of classical test theory and apply the methods to educational and psychological assessments. Topics covered include reliability, validity, generalizability, dichotomous Item Response Theory (IRT), test construction and design, item bias and fairness, Differential Item Functioning (DIF), scaling, linking, and equating. Same as PSYC 595. Prerequisite: EPSY 581 and EPSY 582; PSYC 406 and PSYC 407; or equivalents.

EPSY 586   Theories of Measurement II   credit: 4 Hours.

Provides a conceptual framework of Item Response Theory (IRT) and its applications. Students will learn the techniques and theory of IRT and apply the methods to educational and psychological assessments. Topics covered include both dichotomous and polytomous IRT modelling, item structure and latent traits estimation, modeling and detecting Differential Item Functioning, linking and equating, computer adaptive testing, dimensionality testing, and cognitive diagnosis. Same as PSYC 596. Prerequisite: EPSY 585 or PSYC 490.

EPSY 587   Hierarchical Linear Models   credit: 4 Hours.

This course provides an overview of the use of multilevel models. Students will learn the techniques and theory of hierarchical linear models and apply the methods to data from studies in education, psychology and social sciences. Topics covered include multilevel analyses, random intercept and slope models, 2- and 3-level models, hypothesis testing, model assessment, longitudinal (repeated measures) data, and generalized hierarchical models for categorical variables. Same as PSYC 587 and STAT 587. Approved for letter and S/U grading. Prerequisite: EPSY 581 and EPSY 582, or PSYC 406 and PSYC 407.

EPSY 589   Categorical Data in Ed/Psyc   credit: 4 Hours.

Concepts and methods for analyzing categorical data with an emphasis placed on building and applying models in education, sociology and psychology. Generalized linear models covered including logistic and Poisson regression models, loglinear, logit, and probit models, and models for ordinal data. Same as PSYC 589 and SOC 579. Approved for letter and S/U grading. Credit is not given for EPSY 589 and STAT 426. Prerequisite: EPSY 581 or PSYC 507.

EPSY 590   Advanced Seminar in Educ Psyc   credit: 0 to 4 Hours.

Seminar in educational psychology; topics relate to the areas of specialization represented by the various divisions within the department. Approved for both letter and S/U grading. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor required.

EPSY 591   Field Study and Thesis Seminar   credit: 4 to 8 Hours.

Assists doctoral candidates in planning field studies and thesis problems. Students are expected to present their studies at each of four stages: (1) the inception, delimitation, tentative design stage; (2) the proposed design stage; (3) the revised design stage; and (4) the final design stage. Students are expected to analyze critically all presentations. Prerequisite: Limited to students who have been admitted for doctoral study.

EPSY 595   Independent Study   credit: 0 to 4 Hours.

Offers opportunity and challenge of self-directive, independent study; develops the individual's ability as an independent student; and enables the student to pursue needed study in a field in which appropriate courses are not being offered during a given term. Approved for both letter and S/U grading. May be repeated with approval. Prerequisite: Approval of study outline by adviser and the department chairperson prior to enrollment.

EPSY 599   Thesis Research   credit: 0 to 16 Hours.

Individual direction of research and thesis writing. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated.